Posted: January 24th, 2023

CONSTRUCTION COST ANALYSIS AND BIDDING – Assgn 1

if you can do it.. please do not contact me.

construction EngineeringProject management

Don't use plagiarized sources. Get Your Custom Essay on
CONSTRUCTION COST ANALYSIS AND BIDDING – Assgn 1
Just from $13/Page
Order Essay

COURSE: CONSTRUCTION COST ANALYSIS AND BIDDING

LEVEL: GRADUATE

ASSIGNMENT # 1

TOTAL POINTS: 100

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

After successfully completing this assignment, students will be able to:

• Differentiate between various construction processes

• Differentiate between various methods for cost estimation

Q1. Estimate the preliminary cost of constructing a single family one-story, 2,000-ft2 average-

quality home (you can choose any location). The home is constructed with wood siding on a

wood frame and includes a two-car detached garage, 300-ft2 porch, two and one-half baths, one

fireplace (internal chimney with two flues), cedar shakes, air- conditioning utilizing the heating

ductwork, and a full, unfinished basement. You can use Means Cost Data online, library copy or

the cost data sheet attached. Please refer all the cost resources you have used for your work

(Include a list of assumptions (if any) you have made to calculate the cost).

40 points

Cost Data Source

Attached cost data sheet will be sufficient for this assignment. You can make any

assumptions as needed and provide the list of those assumption in the beginning of the

assignment.

Q2. Search online for a copy of sample contract agreement document and answer the

following questions (you have to attach the copy of sample contract with your work):

a. What type of agreement (lump-sum, unit-price, or cost plus-fee) is used for the project? If
it is a cost- plus-fee agreement, how is the fee determined, and is there a guaranteed

maximum price?

b. What provisions are included in the contract documents regarding the time of
completion? What penalties are there for failing to meet the completion date? Is there a

bonus for completing the project ahead of schedule?

c. How are progress payments handled? When are they due? How quickly will they be
paid?

d. Will retention be withheld? What are the requirements for the release of retention?
e. How is final acceptance handled? What inspections are required? What forms,

documents, maintenance and operation manuals, certifications, red-line drawings, and so

on need to be submitted before final acceptance?

f. What bonds and insurances are needed for the job? 60 points

Data Sources

Some of the sample contract documents can be downloaded by clicking the following links:

https://www.montrosecounty.net/DocumentCenter/View/823/Sample-Construction-Contract

https://www.smgov.net/uploadedFiles/Departments/Public_Works/AdminSvcs_-

_Architecure/SAMPLE%20CONSTRUCTION%20CONTRACT%20(4-16)

https://uh.edu/legal-affairs/cmar_ogc-s-2013-01_revised-05.01.2019

https://www.inf.gov.nt.ca/sites/inf/files/resources/construction_contract_0

https://formswift.com/downloads/construction-contract/construction-contract

Quote of the week:

“Our greatest weakness lies in giving up. The most certain way to succeed is always to try just

one more time.” – Thomas A. Edison

https://www.montrosecounty.net/DocumentCenter/View/823/Sample-Construction-Contract

https://www.smgov.net/uploadedFiles/Departments/Public_Works/AdminSvcs_-_Architecure/SAMPLE%20CONSTRUCTION%20CONTRACT%20(4-16)

https://www.smgov.net/uploadedFiles/Departments/Public_Works/AdminSvcs_-_Architecure/SAMPLE%20CONSTRUCTION%20CONTRACT%20(4-16)

https://uh.edu/legal-affairs/cmar_ogc-s-2013-01_revised-05.01.2019

https://www.inf.gov.nt.ca/sites/inf/files/resources/construction_contract_0

https://formswift.com/downloads/construction-contract/construction-contract

Includes inside the back cover:Includes inside the back cover:
Inside the back cover of this book you’ll find a software download

certificate. The download includes an easy-to-use estimating program
with all the cost estimates in this book. The software will run on PCs
using Windows XP, Vista, 7 or 8 operating systems.

Quarterly price updates on the Web are free and automatic all
during 2015. You’ll be prompted when it’s time to collect the next
update. A connection to the Web is required.

Download all of Craftsman’s most popular costbooks for one low price
with the Craftsman Site License. http://CraftsmanSiteLicense.com

2015
NATIONAL
BUILDING COST
MANUAL
39th Edition

$78.00

Craftsman Book

Company

6058 Corte del Cedro, Carlsbad, CA 92011

Edited by

Ben Moselle

Turn your estimate into a bid.Turn your estimate into a bid.

Turn your bid into a contract.Turn your bid into a contract.

ConstructionContractWriter.comConstructionContractWriter.com

On
line

Pr
evi

ew

Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt

Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

Looking for Other Construction Reference Manuals?
Craftsman has the books to fill your needs. Call 1-800-829-8123 or write to:

CCrraaffttssmmaann BBooookk CCoommppaannyy,, 66005588 CCoorrttee ddeell CCeeddrroo,, CCaarrllssbbaadd,, CCAA 9922001111

for a FFrreeee CCaattaalloogg of over 100 books, including how-to manuals,

annual cost books, and estimating software.

Visit our Web site: http://www.craftsman-book.com

Download all of Craftsman’s most popular costbooks for one low price with the

Craftsman Site License. http://www.CraftsmanSiteLicense.com

Cover design by: Jennifer Johnson
Photos: iStock by Getty Images™
Illustrations by Laura Knight, Devona Quindoy
© 2014 Craftsman Book Company
Portions © 2011 Saylor Publications, Inc.
ISBN 978-1-57218-305-6
Published November 2014 for the year 2015

On
line
Pr
evi
ew
Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

http://craftsman-book.com/

http://www.craftsmansitelicense.com

  • Contents of This Manual
  • 3

  • Explanation of the Cost Tables
  • ………………………….. 4

  • Area Modification Factors
  • …………………………………. 7
    Construction Cost

  • Index
  • ……………………………………

    9

  • Residential Structures Section
  • ………………………….10
    Single Family Residences ………………………………………. 10
    Manufactured Housing…………………………………………… 16
    Multi-Family Residences ………………………………………… 19
    Motels………………………………………………………………….. 23
    Additional Costs for Residences……………………………… 27
    Multi-Family and Motel Garages ……………………………… 31
    Cabins and Recreational Dwellings …………………………. 32
    Conventional Recreational Dwellings……………………….. 33
    “A-Frame” Cabins …………………………………………………. 38
    Additional Costs for Recreational Dwellings ……………… 42
    Life in Years and Depreciation for Residences ………….. 43

    Public Buildings Section …………………………………..44
    Elementary Schools ………………………………………………. 44
    Secondary Schools ……………………………………………….. 53
    Government Buildings……………………………………………. 56
    Public Libraries……………………………………………………… 62
    Fire Stations …………………………………………………………. 68

    Commercial Structures Section …………………………74
    Urban Stores, Masonry or Concrete ………………………… 76
    Urban Stores, Wood or Wood and Steel ………………….. 82
    Suburban Stores, Masonry or Concrete …………………… 89
    Suburban Stores, Wood or Wood and Steel……………… 94
    Supermarkets, Masonry or Concrete ……………………… 103
    Supermarkets, Wood or Wood and Steel ……………….. 105
    Small Food Stores, Masonry or Concrete……………….. 107
    Small Food Stores, Wood Frame…………………………… 109
    Discount Houses, Masonry or Concrete…………………. 111
    Discount Houses, Wood or Wood and Steel …………… 113
    Banks and Savings Offices, Masonry or Concrete …… 115
    Banks and Savings Office, Wood Frame ………………… 120
    Department Stores, Reinforced Concrete……………….. 126
    Department Stores, Masonry or Concrete ………………. 129
    Department Stores, Wood Frame ………………………….. 132
    General Office Buildings, Masonry or Concrete ………. 135
    General Office Buildings, Wood Frame ………………….. 143
    Medical-Dental Buildings, Masonry or Concrete ……… 151
    Medical-Dental Buildings, Wood Frame …………………. 159
    Convalescent Hospitals, Masonry or Concrete ……….. 167
    Convalescent Hospitals, Wood Frame …………………… 169
    Funeral Homes……………………………………………………. 171
    Ecclesiastic Buildings ………………………………………….. 173
    Self Service Restaurants ………………………………………. 175
    Coffee Shop Restaurants ……………………………………… 178
    Conventional Restaurants …………………………………….. 181
    “A-Frame” Restaurants ………………………………………… 183

    Theaters, Masonry or Concrete……………………………… 185
    Mobile Home Parks……………………………………………… 192
    Service Stations, Wood, Masonry or Steel ………………. 198
    Service Stations, Porcelain Finished Steel ………………. 200
    Service Stations, Ranch or Rustic ………………………….. 202
    Additional Costs for Service Stations ……………………… 204
    Service Garages, Masonry or Concrete………………….. 208
    Service Garages, Wood Frame……………………………… 213
    Auto Service Centers, Masonry or Concrete……………. 218

    Industrial Structures Section………………………….. 222
    Warehouses ……………………………………………………….. 224
    Light Industrial Buildings ………………………………………. 225
    Factory Buildings ………………………………………………… 226
    Internal Offices ……………………………………………………. 227
    External Offices …………………………………………………… 227
    Steel Buildings…………………………………………………….. 228
    Alternate Costs for Steel Buildings…………………………. 230
    Commercial and Industrial Building Lives……………….. 235
    Additional Commercial and Industrial Costs……………. 236
    Material Handling System …………………………………….. 242
    Display Fronts …………………………………………………….. 243
    Satellite Receiver Systems ……………………………………. 245
    Signs …………………………………………………………………. 246
    Yard Improvements ……………………………………………… 247

    Agricultural Structures Section ………………………. 249
    General Purpose Barns ………………………………………… 250
    Hay Storage Barns ………………………………………………. 251
    Feed Barns …………………………………………………………. 252
    Shop Buildings ……………………………………………………. 253
    Machinery and Equipment Sheds………………………….. 254
    Small Sheds ……………………………………………………….. 255
    Pole Barns ………………………………………………………….. 256
    Low Cost Dairy Barns…………………………………………… 257
    Stanchion Dairy Barns………………………………………….. 258
    Walk-Through Dairy Barns ……………………………………. 259
    Modern Herringbone Barns ………………………………….. 260
    Miscellaneous Dairy Costs……………………………………. 261
    Poultry Houses, Conventional ……………………………….. 262
    Poultry Houses, Modern Type……………………………….. 263
    Poultry Houses, High Rise Type ……………………………. 264
    Poultry Houses, Deep Pit Type ……………………………… 265
    Poultry House Equipment …………………………………….. 266
    Green Houses …………………………………………………….. 267
    Migrant Worker Housing ………………………………………. 268
    Miscellaneous Agricultural Structures …………………….. 269
    Typical Lives for Agricultural Buildings……………………. 269

    Military Construction Section…………………………. 270
    Facility Costs ……………………………………………….. 271
    Index ……………………………………………………………. 273

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Explanation of the Cost Tables

    4

    This manual shows construction or replacement
    costs for a wide variety of residential, commercial,
    industrial, public, agricultural and military buildings.
    For your convenience and to minimize the chance
    of an error, all the cost and reference information
    you need for each building type is brought together
    on two or three pages. After reading pages 4 to 6,
    you should be able to turn directly to any building
    type and create an error-free estimate or appraisal
    of the construction or replacement cost.

    The costs are per square foot of floor area for
    the basic building and additional costs for optional
    or extra components that differ from building to
    building. Building shape, floor area, design
    elements, materials used, and overall quality
    influence the basic structure cost. These and other
    cost variables are isolated for the building types.
    Components included in the basic square foot cost
    are listed with each building type. Instructions for
    using the basic building costs are included above
    the cost tables. These instructions include a list of
    components that may have to be added to the
    basic cost to find the total cost for your structure.

    The figures in this manual are intended to reflect
    the amount that would be paid by the first user of a
    building completed in mid 2015.

    Costs in the tables include all construction costs:
    labor, material, equipment, plans, building permit,
    supervision, overhead and profit. Cost tables do
    not include land value, site development costs,
    government mandated fees (other than the building
    permit) or the cost of modifying unusual soil
    conditions or grades. Construction expense may
    represent as much as 60% or as little as 40% of the
    cost to the first building owner. Site preparation,
    utility lines, government fees and mandates,
    finance cost and marketing are not part of the
    construction cost and may be as much as 20% of
    the cost to the first building owner.

    Building Quality

    Structures vary widely in quality and the quality
    of construction is the most significant variable in the
    finished cost. For estimating purposes the structure
    should be placed in one or more quality classes.
    These classes are numbered from 1 which is the
    highest quality generally encountered. Each section
    of this manual has a page describing typical
    specifications which define the quality class.

    Each number class has been assigned a word
    description (such as best, good, average or low)
    for convenience and to help avoid possible errors.

    The quality specifications do not reflect some
    design features and construction details that can
    make a building both more desirable and more
    costly. When substantially more than basic design
    elements are present, and when these elements
    add significantly to the cost, it is appropriate to
    classify the quality of the building as higher than
    would be warranted by the materials used in
    construction.

    Many structures do not fall into a single class
    and have features of two quality classes. The tables
    have “half classes” which apply to structures which
    have some features of one class and some
    features of a higher or lower class. Classify a
    building into a “half class” when the quality
    elements are fairly evenly divided between two
    classes. Generally, quality elements do not vary
    widely in a single building. For example, it would be
    unusual to find a top quality single family residence
    with minimum quality roof cover. The most weight
    should be given to quality elements that have the
    greatest cost. For example, the type of wall and
    roof framing or the quality of interior finish are more
    significant than the roof cover or bathroom wall
    finish. Careful evaluation may determine that
    certain structures fall into two distinct classes. In
    this case, the cost of each part of the building
    should be evaluated separately.

    Building Shapes

    Shape classification considers any cost
    differences that arise from variations in building
    outline. Shape classification considerations vary
    somewhat with different building types. Where the
    building shape often varies widely between
    buildings and shape has a significant effect on the
    building cost, basic building costs are given for
    several shapes. Use the table that most closely
    matches the shape of the building you are
    evaluating. If the shape falls near the division
    between two basic building cost tables, it is
    appropriate to average the square foot cost from
    those two tables.

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Explanation of the Cost Tables

    5

    Area of Buildings

    The basic building cost tables reflect the fact
    that larger buildings generally cost less per square
    foot than smaller buildings. The cost tables are
    based on square foot areas which include the
    following:

    1. All floor area within and including the exterior
    walls of the main building.

    2. Inset areas such as vestibules, entrances or
    porches outside of the exterior wall but under the
    main roof.

    3. Any enclosed additions, annexes or lean-tos with
    a square foot cost greater than three-fourths of
    the square foot cost of the main building.

    Select the basic building cost listed below the
    area which falls closest to the actual area of your
    building. If the area of your building falls nearly mid-
    way between two listed building areas, it is
    appropriate to average the square foot costs for the
    listed areas.

    Wall Heights

    Building costs are based on the wall heights
    given in the instructions for each building cost
    table. Wall height for the various floors of a building
    are computed as follows: The basement is
    measured from the bottom of floor slab to the
    bottom of the first floor slab or joist. The main or
    first floor extends from the bottom of the first floor
    slab or joist to the top of the roof slab or ceiling
    joist. Upper floors are measured from the top of the
    floor slab or floor joist to the top of the roof slab or
    ceiling joist. These measurements may be
    illustrated as follows:

    Square foot costs of most building design types
    must be adjusted if the actual wall height differs
    from the listed wall height. Wall height adjustment
    tables are included for buildings requiring this
    adjustment. Wall height adjustment tables list
    square foot costs for a foot of difference in
    perimeter wall height of buildings of various areas.
    The amount applicable to the actual building area
    is added or deducted for each foot of difference
    from the basic wall height.

    Buildings such as residences, medical-dental
    buildings, funeral homes and convalescent
    hospitals usually have a standard 8-foot ceiling
    height except in chapels or day room areas. If a
    significant cost difference exists due to a wall
    height variation, this factor should be considered in
    establishing the quality class.

    Other Adjustments

    A common wall exists when two buildings share
    one wall. Common wall adjustments are made by
    deducting the in-place cost of the exterior wall
    finish plus one-half of the in-place cost of the
    structural portion of the common wall area.

    If an owner has no ownership in a wall, the in-
    place cost of the exterior wall finish plus the in-
    place cost of the structural portion of the wall
    should be deducted from the total building costs.
    Suggested common wall and no wall ownership
    costs are included for many of the building types.

    Some square foot costs include the cost of
    expensive veneer finishes on the entire perimeter
    wall. When these buildings butt against other
    buildings, adjustments should be made for the lack
    of this finish. Where applicable, linear foot cost
    deductions are provided.

    The square foot costs in this manual are based
    on composite costs of total buildings including
    usual work room or storage areas. They are
    intended to be applied on a 100% basis to the total
    building area even though certain areas may or
    may not have interior finish. Only in rare instances
    will it be necessary to modify the square foot cost
    of a portion of a building.

    Multiple story buildings usually share a common
    roof structure and cover, a common foundation
    and common floor or ceiling structures. The costs
    of these components are included in the various
    floor levels as follows:

    Basement

    1s t story

    Upper stories

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Explanation of the Cost Tables

    6

    The first or main floor includes the cost of a floor
    structure built at ground level, foundation costs for
    a one-story building, a complete ceiling and roof
    structure, and a roof cover. The basement includes
    the basement floor structure and the difference
    between the cost of the first floor structure built at
    ground level and its cost built over a basement.
    The second floor includes the difference between
    the cost of a foundation for a one-story building
    and the cost of a foundation for a two-story building
    and the cost of the second story floor structure.

    Location Adjustments

    The figures in this manual are intended as
    national averages for metropolitan areas of the
    United States. Use the information on page 7 to
    adapt the basic building costs to any area listed.
    Frequently building costs outside metropolitan
    areas are 2% to 6% lower if skilled, productive,
    lower cost labor is available in the area. The factors
    on page 7 can be applied to nearly all the square
    foot costs and some of the “additional” costs in this
    book.

    Temporary working conditions in any community
    can affect construction and replacement costs.
    Construction which must be done under deadline
    pressure or in adverse weather conditions or after a
    major fire, flood, or hurricane or in a thin labor
    market can temporarily inflate costs 25% to 50%.
    Conditions such as these are usually temporary
    and affect only a limited area. But the higher costs
    are real and must be considered, no matter how
    limited the area and how transient the condition.

    Depreciation

    Depreciation is the loss in value of a structure
    from all causes and is caused primarily by three
    forms of obsolescence: (1) physical (2) functional,
    and (3) economic.

    Physical obsolescence is the deterioration of
    building components such as paint, carpets or
    roofing. Much of this deterioration is totally curable.
    The physical life tables on pages 43, 235 and 269
    assume normal physical obsolescence. Good
    judgment is required to evaluate how deferred
    maintenance or rehabilitation will reduce or extend the
    anticipated physical life of a building.

    Functional obsolescence is due to some
    deficiency or flaw in the building. For example, too
    few bathrooms for the number of bedrooms or an

    exceptionally high ceiling can reduce the life
    expectancy of a residence. Some functional
    obsolescence can be cured. The physical life
    tables do not consider functional obsolescence.

    Economic obsolescence is caused by
    conditions that occur off site and are beyond
    control of the owner. Examples of economic
    obsolescence include a store in an area of
    declining economic activity or obsolescence
    caused by governmental regulation (such as a
    change in zoning). Because this kind of
    obsolescence is particularly difficult to measure, it
    is not considered in the physical life tables.

    “Effective age” considers all forms of
    depreciation. It may be less than chronological
    age, if recently remodeled or improved, or more
    than the actual age, if deterioration is particularly
    bad. Though effective age is not considered in the
    physical life tables, it may yield a better picture of a
    structure’s life than the actual physical age. Once
    the effective age is determined, considering
    physical, functional and economic deterioration,
    use the percent good tables on pages 43, 235 or
    269 to determine the present value of a
    depreciated building. Present value is the result of
    multiplying the replacement cost (found by using
    the cost tables) by the appropriate percent good.

    Limitations

    This manual will be a useful reference for anyone
    who has to develop budget estimates or
    replacement costs for buildings. Anyone familiar
    with construction estimating understands that even
    very competent estimators with complete working
    drawings, full specifications and precise labor and
    material costs can disagree on the cost of a
    building. Frequently exhaustive estimates for even
    relatively simple structures can vary 10% or more.
    The range of competitive bids on some building
    projects is as much as 20%. Estimating costs is not
    an exact science and there’s room for legitimate
    disagreement on what the “right” cost is. This
    manual can not help you do in a few minutes what
    skilled estimators may not be able to do in many
    hours. This manual will help you determine a
    reasonable replacement or construction cost for
    most buildings. It is not intended as a substitute for
    judgment or as a replacement for sound
    professional practice, but should prove a valuable
    aid to developing an informed opinion of value.

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Area Modification Factors

    Construction costs are higher in some cities than in
    other cities. Add or deduct the percentage shown on this
    page or page 8 to adapt the costs in this book to your job
    site. Adjust your estimated total project cost by the per-
    centage shown for the appropriate city in this table to find
    your total estimated cost. Where 0% is shown it means no
    modification is required. Factors for Canada adjust to
    Canadian dollars.

    These percentages were compiled by comparing the
    construction cost of buildings in nearly 600 communities
    throughout North America. Because these percentages
    are based on completed projects, they consider all con-

    struction cost variables, including labor, equipment and
    material cost, labor productivity, climate, job conditions
    and markup.

    Modification factors are listed alphabetically by state
    and city, followed by the first three digits of the postal zip
    code.

    These percentages are composites of many costs and
    will not necessarily be accurate when estimating the cost
    of any particular part of a building. But when used to
    modify costs for an entire structure, they should improve
    the accuracy of your estimates.

    7

    Alabama Average -6%
    Anniston 362 -9%
    Auburn 368 -6%
    Bellamy 369 -3%
    Birmingham 350-352 3%
    Dothan 363 -6%
    Evergreen 364 -12%
    Gadsden 359 -13%
    Huntsville 358 -3%
    Jasper 355 -11%
    Mobile 365-366 -3%
    Montgomery 360-361 -2%
    Scottsboro 357 -6%
    Selma 367 -6%
    Sheffield 356 -1%
    Tuscaloosa 354 -5%

    Alaska Average 21%
    Anchorage 995 27%
    Fairbanks 997 24%
    Juneau 998 22%
    Ketchikan 999 11%
    King Salmon 996 24%

    Arizona Average -4%
    Chambers 865 -4%
    Douglas 855 -3%
    Flagstaff 860 -9%
    Kingman 864 -5%
    Mesa 852 1%
    Phoenix 850 1%
    Prescott 863 -7%
    Show Low 859 -9%
    Tucson 856-857 -6%
    Yuma 853 0%

    Arkansas Average -7%
    Batesville 725 -10%
    Camden 717 -5%
    Fayetteville 727 -5%
    Fort Smith 729 -7%
    Harrison 726 -14%
    Hope 718 -1%
    Hot Springs 719 -13%
    Jonesboro 724 -8%
    Little Rock 720-722 -3%
    Pine Bluff 716 -2%
    Russellville 728 -6%
    West Memphis 723 -6%

    California Average 8%
    Alhambra 917-918 9%
    Bakersfield 932-933 3%
    El Centro 922 -1%
    Eureka 955 -4%
    Fresno 936-938 -1%
    Herlong 961 -1%
    Inglewood 902-905 9%
    Irvine 926-927 13%
    Lompoc 934 6%
    Long Beach 907-908 10%
    Los Angeles 900-901 8%
    Marysville 959 -1%
    Modesto 953 -1%
    Mojave 935 6%
    Novato 949 13%
    Oakland 945-947 19%
    Orange 928 12%
    Oxnard 930 4%
    Pasadena 910-912 9%
    Rancho Cordova 956-957 6%
    Redding 960 -3%
    Richmond 948 19%
    Riverside 925 3%
    Sacramento 958 6%

    Salinas 939 3%
    San Bernardino 923-924 4%
    San Diego 919-921 7%
    San Francisco 941 28%
    San Jose 950-951 18%
    San Mateo 943-944 20%
    Santa Barbara 931 6%
    Santa Rosa 954 6%
    Stockton 952 1%
    Sunnyvale 940 20%
    Van Nuys 913-916 8%
    Whittier 906 8%

    Colorado Average 1%
    Aurora 800-801 6%
    Boulder 803-804 3%
    Colorado Springs 808-809 -1%
    Denver 802 6%
    Durango 813 0%
    Fort Morgan 807 -3%
    Glenwood Springs 816 4%
    Grand Junction 814-815 -1%
    Greeley 806 4%
    Longmont 805 2%
    Pagosa Springs 811 -6%
    Pueblo 810 2%
    Salida 812 -5%

    Connecticuit Average 12%
    Bridgeport 066 12%
    Bristol 060 12%
    Fairfield 064 14%
    Hartford 061 14%
    New Haven 065 12%
    Norwich 063 8%
    Stamford 068-069 16%
    Waterbury 067 12%
    West Hartford 062 9%

    Delaware Average 2%
    Dover 199 -5%
    Newark 197 7%
    Wilmington 198 5%

    District of Columbia
    Average 12%

    Washington 200-205 12%

    Florida Average -7%
    Altamonte Springs 327 -6%
    Bradenton 342 -8%
    Brooksville 346 -9%
    Daytona Beach 321 -12%
    Fort Lauderdale 333 -1%
    Fort Myers 339 -9%
    Fort Pierce 349 -13%
    Gainesville 326 -9%
    Jacksonville 322 -4%
    Lakeland 338 -8%
    Melbourne 329 -10%
    Miami 330-332 -2%
    Naples 341 -5%
    Ocala 344 -13%
    Orlando 328 -2%
    Panama City 324 -12%
    Pensacola 325 -9%
    Saint Augustine 320 -7%
    Saint Cloud 347 -5%
    St Petersburg 337 -7%
    Tallahassee 323 -9%
    Tampa 335-336 -3%
    West Palm Beach 334 -3%

    Georgia Average -4%
    Albany 317 -9%
    Athens 306 -6%

    Atlanta 303 13%
    Augusta 308-309 -4%
    Buford 305 -4%
    Calhoun 307 -11%
    Columbus 318-319 -6%
    Dublin/Fort Valley 310 -9%
    Hinesville 313 -6%
    Kings Bay 315 -4%
    Macon 312 -3%
    Marietta 300-302 4%
    Savannah 314 -5%
    Statesboro 304 -11%
    Valdosta 316 -3%

    Hawaii Average 24%
    Aliamanu 968 25%
    Ewa 967 23%
    Halawa Heights 967 23%
    Hilo 967 23%
    Honolulu 968 25%
    Kailua 968 25%
    Lualualei 967 23%
    Mililani Town 967 23%
    Pearl City 967 23%
    Wahiawa 967 23%
    Waianae 967 23%
    Wailuku (Maui) 967 23%

    Idaho Average -9%
    Boise 837 -2%
    Coeur d’Alene 838 -11%
    Idaho Falls 834 -8%
    Lewiston 835 -12%
    Meridian 836 -9%
    Pocatello 832 -10%
    Sun Valley 833 -10%

    Illinois Average 5%
    Arlington Heights 600 16%
    Aurora 605 15%
    Belleville 622 0%
    Bloomington 617 1%
    Carbondale 629 -5%
    Carol Stream 601 15%
    Centralia 628 -3%
    Champaign 618 0%
    Chicago 606-608 17%
    Decatur 623 -8%
    Galesburg 614 -6%
    Granite City 620 3%
    Green River 612 4%
    Joliet 604 16%
    Kankakee 609 1%
    Lawrenceville 624 -6%
    Oak Park 603 19%
    Peoria 615-606 7%
    Peru 613 3%
    Quincy 602 17%
    Rockford 610-611 4%
    Springfield 625-527 0%
    Urbana 619 -3%

    Indiana Average -2%
    Aurora 470 -4%
    Bloomington 474 -1%
    Columbus 472 -4%
    Elkhart 465 -4%
    Evansville 476-477 4%
    Fort Wayne 467-468 -3%
    Gary 463-464 20%
    Indianapolis 460-462 7%
    Jasper 475 -8%
    Jeffersonville 471 -4%
    Kokomo 469 -8%
    Lafayette 479 -6%

    Muncie 473 -9%
    South Bend 466 -3%
    Terre Haute 478 -3%

    Iowa Average -4%
    Burlington 526 -3%
    Carroll 514 -11%
    Cedar Falls 506 -4%
    Cedar Rapids 522-524 3%
    Cherokee 510 -1%
    Council Bluffs 515 -1%
    Creston 508 -8%
    Davenport 527-528 3%
    Decorah 521 -7%
    Des Moines 500-503 4%
    Dubuque 520 -3%
    Fort Dodge 505 -3%
    Mason City 504 -3%
    Ottumwa 525 -6%
    Sheldon 512 -8%
    Shenandoah 516 -13%
    Sioux City 511 3%
    Spencer 513 -8%
    Waterloo 507 -5%

    Kansas Average -7%
    Colby 677 -7%
    Concordia 669 -13%
    Dodge City 678 -6%
    Emporia 668 -5%
    Fort Scott 667 -8%
    Hays 676 -13%
    Hutchinson 675 -7%
    Independence 673 0%
    Liberal 679 -7%
    Salina 674 -8%
    Wichita 670 -5%

    Kentucky Average -4%
    Ashland 411-412 -6%
    Bowling Green 421 -5%
    Campton 413-414 -10%
    Covington 410 1%
    Elizabethtown 427 -9%
    Frankfort 406 -1%
    Hazard 417-418 -6%
    Hopkinsville 422 -7%
    Lexington 403-405 2%
    London 407-409 -7%
    Louisville 400-402 1%
    Owensboro 423 -3%
    Paducah 420 -2%
    Pikeville 415-416 -4%
    Somerset 425-426 -10%
    White Plains 424 -5%

    Louisiana Average 0%
    Alexandria 713-714 -4%
    Baton Rouge 707-708 10%
    Houma 703 6%
    Lafayette 705 2%
    Lake Charles 706 0%
    Mandeville 704 -1%
    Minden 710 -6%
    Monroe 712 -9%
    New Orleans 700-701 2%
    Shreveport 711 -4%

    Maine Average -7%
    Auburn 042 -5%
    Augusta 043 -8%
    Bangor 044 -8%
    Bath 045 -7%
    Brunswick 046 -2%

    Camden 047 -11%
    Cutler 048 -10%
    Dexter 049 -8%
    Northern Area 050 -10%
    Portland 051 0%

    Maryland Average 2%
    Annapolis 214 8%
    Baltimore 210-212 8%
    Bethesda 208-209 13%
    Church Hill 216 -4%
    Cumberland 215 -10%
    Elkton 219 -2%
    Frederick 217 5%
    Laurel 206-207 9%
    Salisbury 218 -6%

    Massachusetts
    Average 13%

    Ayer 015-016 8%
    Bedford 017 18%
    Boston 021-022 34%
    Brockton 023-024 21%
    Cape Cod 026 4%
    Chicopee 010 8%
    Dedham 019 17%
    Fitchburg 014 13%
    Hingham 020 20%
    Lawrence 018 16%
    Nantucket 025 11%
    New Bedford 027 10%
    Northfield 013 1%
    Pittsfield 012 1%
    Springfield 011 9%

    Michigan Average 1%
    Battle Creek 490-491 -1%
    Detroit 481-482 8%
    Flint 484-485 -5%
    Grand Rapids 493-495 1%
    Grayling 497 -8%
    Jackson 492 -2%
    Lansing 488-489 2%
    Marquette 498-499 1%
    Pontiac 483 10%
    Royal Oak 480 8%
    Saginaw 486-487 -6%
    Traverse City 496 -1%

    Minnesota Average 0%
    Bemidji 566 -5%
    Brainerd 564 -1%
    Duluth 556-558 1%
    Fergus Falls 565 -8%
    Magnolia 561 -9%
    Mankato 560 -3%
    Minneapolis 553-555 12%
    Rochester 559 -2%
    St Cloud 563 5%
    St Paul 550-551 11%
    Thief River Falls 567 -1%
    Willmar 562 -3%

    Mississippi Average -8%
    Clarksdale 386 -9%
    Columbus 397 -1%
    Greenville 387 -15%
    Greenwood 389 -11%
    Gulfport 395 -2%
    Jackson 390-392 -5%
    Laurel 394 -8%
    McComb 396 -11%
    Meridian 393 -4%
    Tupelo 388 -9%

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Area Modification Factors

    8

    Missouri Average -4%
    Cape Girardeau 637 -4%
    Caruthersville 638 -9%
    Chillicothe 646 -8%
    Columbia 652 -5%
    East Lynne 647 -6%
    Farmington 636 -9%
    Hannibal 634 -2%
    Independence 640 5%
    Jefferson City 650-651 -5%
    Joplin 648 -8%
    Kansas City 641 7%
    Kirksville 635 -13%
    Knob Noster 653 -7%
    Lebanon 654-655 -13%
    Poplar Bluff 639 -7%
    Saint Charles 633 2%
    Saint Joseph 644-645 2%
    Springfield 656-658 -9%
    St Louis 630-631 7%

    Montana Average -4%
    Billings 590-591 0%
    Butte 597 -5%
    Fairview 592 3%
    Great Falls 594 -4%
    Havre 595 -10%
    Helena 596 -3%
    Kalispell 599 -7%
    Miles City 593 -7%
    Missoula 598 -7%

    Nebraska Average -9%
    Alliance 693 -10%
    Columbus 686 -6%
    Grand Island 688 -7%
    Hastings 689 -9%
    Lincoln 683-685 -5%
    McCook 690 -11%
    Norfolk 687 -9%
    North Platte 691 -10%
    Omaha 680-681 -1%
    Valentine 692 -15%

    Nevada Average 4%
    Carson City 897 -6%
    Elko 898 21%
    Ely 893 1%
    Fallon 894 2%
    Las Vegas 889-891 3%
    Reno 895 1%

    New Hampshire
    Average 0%

    Charlestown 036 -4%
    Concord 034 -1%
    Dover 038 3%
    Lebanon 037 -2%
    Littleton 035 -3%
    Manchester 032-033 3%
    New Boston 030-031 5%

    New Jersey Average 14%
    Atlantic City 080 10%
    Brick 087 6%
    Dover 078 15%
    Edison 088 17%
    Hackensack 076 15%
    Monmouth 077 16%
    Newark 071-073 16%
    Passaic 070 16%
    Paterson 074-075 13%
    Princeton 085 15%
    Summit 079 21%
    Trenton 086 13%

    New Mexico Average -10%
    Alamogordo 883 -13%
    Albuquerque 870-871 -4%
    Clovis 881 -12%
    Farmington 874 -1%
    Fort Sumner 882 -3%
    Gallup 873 -8%
    Holman 877 -11%
    Las Cruces 880 -13%
    Santa Fe 875 -9%
    Socorro 878 -17%
    Truth or

    Consequences 879 -13%
    Tucumcari 884 -11%

    New York Average 9%
    Albany 120-123 9%
    Amityville 117 15%
    Batavia 140 1%

    Binghamton 137 0%
    Bronx 104 16%
    Brooklyn 112 14%
    Buffalo 142 2%
    Elmira 149 -1%
    Flushing 113 23%
    Garden City 115 21%
    Hicksville 118 20%
    Ithaca 148 -3%
    Jamaica 114 22%
    Jamestown 147 -5%
    Kingston 124 -3%
    Long Island 111 36%
    Montauk 119 13%
    New York

    (Manhattan) 100 37%
    New York City 100-102 37%
    Newcomb 128 1%
    Niagara Falls 143 -6%
    Plattsburgh 129 -1%
    Poughkeepsie 125-126 2%
    Queens 110 25%
    Rochester 144-146 2%
    Rockaway 116 18%
    Rome 133-134 -4%
    Staten Island 103 15%
    Stewart 127 -3%
    Syracuse 130-132 2%
    Tonawanda 141 -1%
    Utica 135 -6%
    Watertown 136 2%
    West Point 109 9%
    White Plains 105-108 19%

    North Carolina Average -5%
    Asheville 287 -8%
    Charlotte 280-282 6%
    Durham 277 1%
    Elizabeth City 279 -8%
    Fayetteville 283 -7%
    Goldsboro 275 -1%
    Greensboro 274 -4%
    Hickory 286 -10%
    Kinston 285 -10%
    Raleigh 276 2%
    Rocky Mount 278 -7%
    Wilmington 284 -8%
    Winston-Salem 270-273 -6%

    North Dakota Average 5%
    Bismarck 585 4%
    Dickinson 586 10%
    Fargo 580-581 3%
    Grand Forks 582 1%
    Jamestown 584 -3%
    Minot 587 11%
    Nekoma 583 -8%
    Williston 588 21%

    Ohio Average 0%
    Akron 442-443 1%
    Canton 446-447 -1%
    Chillicothe 456 -4%
    Cincinnati 450-452 4%
    Cleveland 440-441 3%
    Columbus 432 6%
    Dayton 453-455 -1%
    Lima 458 -6%
    Marietta 457 -4%
    Marion 433 -3%
    Newark 430-431 4%
    Sandusky 448-449 -1%
    Steubenville 439 1%
    Toledo 434-436 6%
    Warren 444 -3%
    Youngstown 445 0%
    Zanesville 437-438 -1%

    Oklahoma Average -6%
    Adams 739 -9%
    Ardmore 734 -6%
    Clinton 736 -3%
    Durant 747 -13%
    Enid 737 -4%
    Lawton 735 -12%
    McAlester 745 -9%
    Muskogee 744 -8%
    Norman 730 -4%
    Oklahoma City 731 -3%
    Ponca City 746 -1%
    Poteau 749 -9%
    Pryor 743 -8%
    Shawnee 748 -10%
    Tulsa 740-741 -1%
    Woodward 738 2%

    Oregon Average -5%
    Adrian 979 -14%
    Bend 977 -8%
    Eugene 974 -3%
    Grants Pass 975 -6%
    Klamath Falls 976 -10%
    Pendleton 978 -4%
    Portland 970-972 10%
    Salem 973 -3%

    Pennsylvania Average -1%
    Allentown 181 4%
    Altoona 166 -8%
    Beaver Springs 178 -5%
    Bethlehem 180 6%
    Bradford 167 -8%
    Butler 160 -2%
    Chambersburg 172 -8%
    Clearfield 168 -2%
    DuBois 158 -10%
    East Stroudsburg 183 -4%
    Erie 164-165 -7%
    Genesee 169 -7%
    Greensburg 156 -2%
    Harrisburg 170-171 3%
    Hazleton 182 -5%
    Johnstown 159 -9%
    Kittanning 162 -6%
    Lancaster 175 1%
    Meadville 163 -11%
    Montrose 188 2%
    New Castle 161 -3%
    Philadelphia 190-191 13%
    Pittsburgh 152 5%
    Pottsville 179 -8%
    Punxsutawney 157 -2%
    Reading 195196 2%
    Scranton 184-185 -1%
    Somerset 155 -9%
    Southeastern 193 10%
    Uniontown 154 -5%
    Valley Forge 194 13%
    Warminster 189 11%
    Warrendale 150-151 6%
    Washington 153 8%
    Wilkes Barre 186-187 -3%
    Williamsport 177 -2%
    York 173-174 2%

    Rhode Island Average 6%
    Bristol 028 7%
    Coventry 028 7%
    Cranston 029 6%
    Davisville 028 7%
    Narragansett 028 7%
    Newport 028 7%
    Providence 029 6%
    Warwick 028 7%

    South Carolina Average -4%
    Aiken 298 2%
    Beaufort 299 -6%
    Charleston 294 -1%
    Columbia 290-292 -5%
    Greenville 296 -4%
    Myrtle Beach 295 -9%
    Rock Hill 297 -8%
    Spartanburg 293 -4%

    South Dakota Average -8%
    Aberdeen 574 -7%
    Mitchell 573 -8%
    Mobridge 576 -11%
    Pierre 575 -13%
    Rapid City 577 -8%
    Sioux Falls 570-571 -2%
    Watertown 572 -8%

    Tennessee Average -3%
    Chattanooga 374 0%
    Clarksville 370 1%
    Cleveland 373 -2%
    Columbia 384 -7%
    Cookeville 385 -10%
    Jackson 383 -4%
    Kingsport 376 -5%
    Knoxville 377-379 -1%
    McKenzie 382 -8%
    Memphis 380-381 2%
    Nashville 371-372 5%

    Texas Average -1%
    Abilene 795-796 -3%
    Amarillo 790-791 -2%
    Arlington 760 1%
    Austin 786-787 4%
    Bay City 774 23%
    Beaumont 776-777 8%
    Brownwood 768 -9%
    Bryan 778 -5%
    Childress 792 -14%

    Corpus Christi 783-784 5%
    Dallas 751-753 5%
    Del Rio 788 -8%
    El Paso 798-799 -12%
    Fort Worth 761-762 1%
    Galveston 775 10%
    Giddings 789 -1%
    Greenville 754 4%
    Houston 770-772 12%
    Huntsville 773 11%
    Longview 756 -1%
    Lubbock 793-794 -7%
    Lufkin 759 -6%
    McAllen 785 -13%
    Midland 797 9%
    Palestine 758 -6%
    Plano 750 6%
    San Angelo 769 -8%
    San Antonio 780-782 -1%
    Texarkana 755 -9%
    Tyler 757 -7%
    Victoria 779 0%
    Waco 765-767 -6%
    Wichita Falls 763 -10%
    Woodson 764 -6%

    Utah Average -4%
    Clearfield 840 -1%
    Green River 845 -2%
    Ogden 843-844 -10%
    Provo 846-847 -9%
    Salt Lake City 841 1%

    Vermont Average -5%
    Albany 058 -7%
    Battleboro 053 -4%
    Beecher Falls 059 -8%
    Bennington 052 -8%
    Burlington 054 3%
    Montpelier 056 -4%
    Rutland 057 -8%
    Springfield 051 -7%
    White River

    Junction 050 -6%

    Virginia Average -5%
    Abingdon 242 -9%
    Alexandria 220-223 11%
    Charlottesville 229 -6%
    Chesapeake 233 -3%
    Culpeper 227 -5%
    Farmville 239 -13%
    Fredericksburg 224-225 -5%
    Galax 243 -12%
    Harrisonburg 228 -8%
    Lynchburg 245 -9%
    Norfolk 235-237 -2%
    Petersburg 238 -4%
    Radford 241 -10%
    Reston 201 8%
    Richmond 232 2%
    Roanoke 240 -10%
    Staunton 244 -9%
    Tazewell 246 -6%
    Virginia Beach 234 -5%
    Williamsburg 230-231 -4%
    Winchester 226 -5%

    Washington Average 0%
    Clarkston 994 -6%
    Everett 982 3%
    Olympia 985 -1%
    Pasco 993 2%
    Seattle 980-981 12%
    Spokane 990-992 -3%
    Tacoma 983-984 3%
    Vancouver 986 2%
    Wenatchee 988 -5%
    Yakima 989 -4%

    West Virginia Average -5%
    Beckley 258-259 -6%
    Bluefield 247-248 0%
    Charleston 250-253 6%
    Clarksburg 263-264 -4%
    Fairmont 266 -11%
    Huntington 255-257 -1%

    Wisconsin Average 1%
    Amery 540 0%
    Beloit 535 6%
    Clam Lake 545 -6%
    Eau Claire 547 -3%
    Green Bay 541-543 2%
    La Crosse 546 -1%
    Ladysmith 548 1%
    Madison 537 8%
    Milwaukee 530-534 7%
    Oshkosh 549 3%
    Portage 539 4%
    Prairie du Chien 538 -6%
    Wausau 544 -2%

    Lewisburg 249 -15%
    Martinsburg 254 -6%
    Morgantown 265 -5%
    New Martinsville 262 -10%
    Parkersburg 261 2%
    Romney 267 -8%
    Sugar Grove 268 -8%
    Wheeling 260 -1%

    Wyoming Average -2%
    Casper 826 2%
    Cheyenne/Laramie 820 -3%
    Gillette 827 2%
    Powell 824 -8%
    Rawlins 823 2%
    Riverton 825 -7%
    Rock Springs 829-831 2%
    Sheridan 828 -5%
    Wheatland 822 -7%

    UNITED STATES
    TERRITORIES

    Guam 18%
    Puerto Rico -21%

    VIRGIN ISLANDS (U.S.)

    St. Croix 2%
    St. John 20%
    St. Thomas 5%

    CANADIAN AREA
    MODIFIERS

    These figures assume an
    exchange rate of $1.00
    Canadian to $0.93 U.S.

    Alberta Average 13%
    Calgary 14%
    Edmonton 14%
    Fort McMurray 11%

    British Columbia
    Average 7%

    Fraser Valley 6%
    Okanagan 6%
    Vancouver 9%

    Manitoba Average 0%
    North Manitoba 0%
    South Manitoba 0%
    Selkirk 0%
    Winnipeg 0%

    New Brunswick
    Average -13%

    Moncton -13%

    Nova Scotia Average -8%
    Amherst -8%
    Nova Scotia -7%
    Sydney -8%

    Newfoundland/Labrador
    Average -3%

    Ontario Average 7%
    London 7%
    Thunder Bay 6%
    Toronto 7%

    Quebec Average -1%
    Montreal -1%
    Quebec City -1%

    Saskatchewan
    Average 3%

    La Ronge 3%
    Prince Albert 2%
    Saskatoon 5%

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

  • Building Cost Historical Index
  • 9

    Use this table to find the approximate current dollar building cost when the actual cost is known for any year since
    1948. Multiply the figure listed below for the building type and year of construction by the known cost. The result is the
    estimated 2015 construction cost.
    Masonry Concrete Steel Wood-Frame Agricultural Year of
    Year Buildings Buildings Buildings Buildings Buildings Construction

    1948 14.58 15.62 18.33 13.60 12.22 1948
    1949 14.66 15.44 18.25 13.77 12.60 1949
    1950 13.95 14.74 17.90 13.16 11.71 1950
    1951 13.05 13.92 16.25 12.31 10.87 1951
    1952 12.58 13.58 15.90 12.10 10.77 1952
    1953 12.41 13.13 15.18 11.80 10.54 1953
    1954 12.18 12.66 15.18 11.80 10.54 1954
    1955 11.68 12.08 14.38 11.17 10.08 1955
    1956 11.08 11.55 13.24 10.70 9.66 1956
    1957 10.76 11.11 12.71 10.63 9.43 1957
    1958 10.46 10.69 12.10 10.60 11.24 1958
    1959 10.13 10.35 11.81 10.15 9.01 1959
    1960 9.89 10.16 11.62 10.00 8.83 1960
    1961 9.69 10.12 11.43 9.81 8.80 1961
    1962 9.48 9.82 11.15 9.70 8.67 1962
    1963 9.33 9.57 11.02 9.51 7.86 1963
    1964 9.06 9.46 10.86 9.19 8.26 1964
    1965 8.77 9.21 10.49 8.99 8.04 1965
    1966 8.38 8.95 10.09 8.60 7.81 1966
    1967 8.18 8.52 9.44 8.18 7.50 1967
    1968 7.84 8.05 9.01 7.73 7.17 1968
    1969 7.41 7.69 8.70 7.45 6.76 1969
    1970 7.11 7.35 8.26 7.08 6.43 1970
    1971 6.67 6.73 7.67 6.09 5.99 1971
    1972 6.20 6.23 7.17 6.11 5.57 1972
    1973 5.66 5.91 6.37 5.64 5.23 1973
    1974 5.04 5.42 5.98 5.27 4.86 1974
    1975 4.58 4.78 5.38 4.96 4.33 1975
    1976 4.29 4.56 5.10 4.77 4.10 1976
    1977 4.00 4.27 4.85 4.43 3.86 1977
    1978 3.72 4.00 4.46 4.08 3.49 1978
    1979 3.42 3.56 4.00 3.74 3.31 1979
    1980 3.10 3.23 3.56 3.35 2.99 1980
    1981 2.92 3.05 3.26 3.20 2.80 1981
    1982 2.83 2.92 3.16 3.09 2.69 1982
    1983 2.69 2.83 3.10 2.95 2.54 1983
    1984 2.52 2.65 2.96 2.72 2.47 1984
    1985 2.45 2.52 2.88 2.64 2.43 1985
    1986 2.39 2.50 2.83 2.60 2.38 1986
    1987 2.38 2.45 2.80 2.55 2.36 1987
    1988 2.33 2.36 2.74 2.53 2.32 1988
    1989 2.27 2.32 2.61 2.48 2.24 1989
    1990 2.14 2.22 2.48 2.30 2.14 1990
    1991 2.32 2.19 2.36 2.18 2.03 1991
    1992 2.07 2.16 2.33 2.17 2.01 1992
    1993 2.02 2.14 2.24 2.14 1.98 1993
    1994 1.97 2.00 2.16 2.06 1.84 1994
    1995 1.87 1.83 2.00 1.94 1.73 1995
    1996 1.81 1.80 1.95 1.89 1.70 1996
    1997 1.74 1.74 1.87 1.85 1.66 1997
    1998 1.66 1.66 1.80 1.77 1.64 1998
    1999 1.60 1.60 1.75 1.75 1.61 1999
    2000 1.56 1.56 1.68 1.69 1.56 2000
    2001 1.51 1.51 1.65 1.63 1.52 2001
    2002 1.47 1.47 1.61 1.61 1.49 2002
    2003 1.45 1.45 1.57 1.60 1.46 2003
    2004 1.39 1.39 1.53 1.56 1.42 2004
    2005 1.29 1.29 1.37 1.39 1.39 2005
    2006 1.21 1.21 1.26 1.25 1.24 2006
    2007 1.17 1.17 1.20 1.16 1.15 2007
    2008 1.10 1.10 1.14 1.11 1.09 2008
    2009 1.09 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.09 2009
    2010 1.07 1.07 1.04 1.10 1.08 2010
    2011 1.08 1.08 1.07 1.12 1.11 2011
    2012 1.07 1.07 0.96 1.08 1.09 2012
    2013 1.02 1.02 1.02 1.02 1.02 2013
    2014 1.01 1.01 1.01 1.01 1.01 2014
    2015 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 2015

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Residential Structures Section

    10 Residential Structures Section

    The figures in this section include all costs
    associated with normal construction:

    Foundations as required for normal soil conditions.
    Excavation for foundations, piers, and other foundation
    components given a fairly level construction site. Floor,
    wall, and roof structures. Interior floor, wall, and ceiling
    finishes. Exterior wall finish and roof cover. Interior
    partitions as described in the quality class. Finish
    carpentry, doors, windows, trim, etc. Electric wiring and
    fixtures. Rough and finish plumbing as described in
    applicable building specifications. Built-in appliances as
    described in applicable building specifications. All labor

    and materials including supervision. All design and
    engineering fees, if necessary. Permits and fees. Utility
    hook-ups. Contractors’ contingency, overhead and profit.

    The square foot costs do not include heating and
    cooling equipment or the items listed in the section
    “Additional Costs for Residential Structures” which
    appear on pages 27 to 31. The costs of the following
    should be figured separately and added to the basic
    structure cost: porches, basements, balconies, exterior
    stairways, built-in equipment beyond that listed in the
    quality classifications, garages and carports.

    Single Family Residences

    Single family residences vary widely in quality and the
    quality of construction is the most significant factor
    influencing cost. Residences are listed in six quality
    classes. Class 1 is the most expensive commonly
    encountered and Class 6 is the minimum required under
    most building codes. Nearly all homes built from stock
    plans or offered to the public by residential tract
    developers will fall into Class 3, 4, 5, or 6. For
    convenience, these classes are labeled Best Standard,
    Good Standard, Average Standard or Minimum Standard.
    Class 1 residences are labeled Luxury. Class 2
    residences are labeled Semi-Luxury. Class 1 and 2
    residences are designed by professional architects,
    usually to meet preferences of the first owner.
    The shape of the outside perimeter also has a significant
    influence on cost. The more complex the shape, the
    more expensive the structure per square foot of floor.
    The shape classification of multiple story or split-level
    homes should be based on the outline formed by the
    outer-most exterior walls, including the garage area,
    regardless of the story level. Most residences that fall
    into Classes 3, 4, 5 or 6 have 4, 6, 8 or 10 corners, as
    illustrated below. Small insets that do not require a
    change in the roof line can be ignored when evaluating
    the outside perimeter.
    Class 1 and 2 (Luxury and Semi-Luxury) residences
    have more than ten corners and are best evaluated by
    counting the “building masses.” A building mass is
    a group of contiguous rooms on one or more levels
    with access at varying angles from a common point or

    hallway. The illustration at the right below represents a
    residence with two building masses. Most Class 1 and
    Class 2 residences have from one to four building
    masses, ignoring any attached garage. For convenience,
    cost tables for Class 1 and 2 single family residences
    with one, two, three or four building masses have been
    appended to cost tables for Class 3, 4, 5 and 6
    residences with 4, 6, 8 and 10 building corners.

    Residences on larger lots often include a separate
    housekeeping unit, either remote from the main structure
    (as illustrated below at the right) or joined to the main
    structure by a hallway (no common wall). Evaluate any
    separate housekeeping unit as a separate residence.
    The quality class of separate housekeeping units will
    usually be the same as the main residence if designed
    and built at the same time as the main residence.

    Residences which have features of two or more quality
    classes can be placed between two of the six labeled
    classes. The tables have five half-classes (1 & 2, 2 & 3,
    etc.) which can be applied to residences with some
    characteristics of two or more quality classes. If a portion
    of a residence differs significantly in quality from other
    portions, evaluate the square footage of each portion
    separately.

    These figures can be applied to nearly all single-family
    residences built using conventional methods and readily
    available materials, including the relatively small number
    of highly decorative, starkly original or exceptionally well-
    appointed residences.

    4 corners 6 corners 8 corners 10 corners 2 building masses and one separate unit

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Single Family Residences

    Residential Structures Section 11

    Quality Classification

    Class 1 Class 2 Class 3 Class 4 Class 5 Class 6
    Luxury Semi-Luxury Best Std. Good Std. Average Std. Minimum Std.

    Foundation Reinforced Reinforced Reinforced Reinforced concrete Reinforced concrete Reinforced concrete.
    (9% of total cost) concrete. concrete. concrete. or concrete block. or concrete block.
    Floor Engineered Engineered Engineered Wood frame or Standard wood Slab on grade.
    Structure wood or steel wood or steel wood or steel slab on grade, frame or slab No changes
    (12% of total cost) exceeding code or reinforced or reinforced changes in shape on grade with in elevation.
    minimums. concrete slab. concrete slab. and elevation. elevation changes.
    Wall Framing Wood or steel, Wood or steel, Wood or steel, Wood or steel, Wood or steel, Wood or steel,
    and Exterior very irregular walls, irregular shape, several wall offsets, stucco or wood stucco or wood stucco or hardboard
    Finish stone veneer, masonry veneer, wood or masonry siding, some trim siding, few offsets, siding, minimum
    (14% of total cost) many architectural better grade doors accents, good grade or veneer, average commodity grade grade doors and
    doors and windows. and windows. doors and windows. doors and windows. doors and windows. windows.
    Roof Complex plan, tile, Multi-level, slate, Multi-pitch, shake, Wood trusses, tile Wood frame, shingle Wood frame,
    (10% of total cost) slate or metal, tile or flat surface, tile or flat surface, or good shingles, or built-up cover, composition shingle
    highly detailed. decorative details. large closed soffit. closed soffit. open 24″ soffit. cover, open soffit.
    Floor Finish Terrazzo, marble, Marble or granite Simulated marble Better sheet vinyl Good sheet vinyl Composition tile
    (5% of total cost) granite, or inlaid entry, hardwood, tile entry, good and average carpet, and standard carpet, or minimum grade
    hardwood or best good carpet or sheet carpet, hardwood some areas with small area with sheet vinyl.
    carpet throughout. vinyl elsewhere. or vinyl elsewhere. masonry or tile. tile or hardwood.
    Interior Wall Plaster or gypsum Plaster on gypsum Gypsum wallboard 1/2″ gypsum 1/2″ gypsum 1/2″ gypsum
    and Ceiling wallboard with or metal lath or 2 with putty or texture wallboard with wallboard with wallboard, smooth
    Finish artistic finish, layers of 5/8″ coat finish, some textured finish, textured finish, or orange peel
    (8% of total cost) many offsets and gypsum wallboard, irregular walls, several irregular most walls are finish. Nearly all
    wall openings, decorative details, decorative details walls and wall rectangular, doors walls are regular,
    decorative details many irregular in living room, entry openings, some. and windows are no decorative
    in nearly all rooms. wall openings. and kitchen. decorative details. the only openings. details.
    Interior Exposed beams or Great room has Cathedral ceiling 8′ or 9′ ceiling 8′ or 9′ ceiling Drop ceiling in
    Detail decorative ceiling, 12′ to 16′ ceiling, at entry, one or throughout, walk- throughout, sliding kitchen, other
    (5% of total cost) 12′ to 16′ ceiling most rooms have more floor level in closet in master mirrored closet rooms have 7’6″
    in great room, windows on two changes, several bedroom, separate doors, standard to 8′ ceiling,
    many sky widows, sides, formal dining wall openings or dining area, some grade molding and minimum grade
    built-in shelving area, several framed pass-throughs, decorative wood trim, breakfast bar molding and trim.
    and alcoves for art. openings. formal dining area. trim. or nook.
    Bath Custom large tile Large tile showers, Tile or fiberglass Good plastic tub and Average plastic tub Minimum plastic
    Detail showers, separate at least one bathtub, shower, at least one shower in at least one and shower in at tub and shower in
    (4% of total cost) elevated spa in glass block or large built-in bathtub, bathroom, one small least one bathroom. one bathroom.
    master bathroom. window by each bath. window in bathroom. window in each bath.
    Kitchen Over 30 LF of Over 25 LF of Over 20 LF of good Over 15 LF of stock Over 10 LF of stock Less than 10
    Detail deluxe wall and good custom base stock wall and base standard grade wall standard grade wall LF of low-cost
    (8% of total cost) base cabinets, and wall cabinets, cabinets, tile or and base cabinets, and base cabinets, wall and base
    stone counter top, synthetic stone acrylic counter top, low-cost tile or low-cost acrylic or cabinets, laminated
    island work area, counter top, desk desk and breakfast acrylic counter top, laminated plastic plastic counter top,
    breakfast bar. and breakfast bar. bar or nook. breakfast nook. counter top. space for table.
    Plumbing 4 deluxe fixtures 4 good fixtures 3 good fixtures 3 standard fixtures 3 standard fixtures 3 minimum
    (12% of total cost) per bathroom, per bathroom, per bathroom, per bathroom, per bathroom, fixtures per
    more bathrooms more bathrooms as many bathrooms less bathrooms less bathrooms bathroom,
    than bedrooms. than bedrooms. as bedrooms. than bedrooms. than bedrooms. 2 bathrooms.
    Special 10 luxury built-in 8 good built-in 6 good built-in 5 standard built-in 4 standard grade 4 minimum
    Features appliances, wet appliances, wet appliances, walk-in appliances, sliding kitchen appliances. grade kitchen.
    (3% of total cost) bar, home theater, bar, walk-in pantry, pantry, wet bar, glass or French doors, appliances.
    pantry, wine cellar. central vacuum. central vacuum. laundry room.
    Electrical Over 100 recessed 80 to 100 recessed Ample recessed Limited recessed 12 lighting fixtures, 10 or less lighting
    System or track lights, lighting fixtures. lighting on dimmers, lighting on dimmers, switch-operated fixtures, switch-
    (10% of total cost) security system, security system, computer network, multiple TV outlets. duplex plug outlets operated plug outlets
    computer network. computer network. multiple TV outlets. in bedrooms. in most rooms.
    If Exterior Reinforced split Reinforced block Textured or coated Colored or coated Colored concrete Painted concrete
    Walls are face concrete or brick with concrete block concrete block block or painted block or common-
    Masonry block or brick with masonry veneer or good quality or good quality common brick. brick.
    face brick veneer. or stucco coat. detailed brick. brick.

    Note: Use the percent of total cost to help identify the correct quality classification.

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Single Family Residences

    12 Residential Structures Section

    4 Corners (Classes 3, 4, 5 and 6) or
    One Building Mass (Classes 1 and 2 Only)

    Estimating Procedure
    1. Establish the structure quality class by applying the information on page 11.
    2. Multiply the structure floor area (excluding the garage) by the appropriate square foot cost below.
    3. Multiply the total from step 2 by the correct location factor listed on page 7 or 8.
    4. Add, when appropriate, the cost of a porch, garage, heating and cooling equipment, basement, fireplace, carport,

    appliances and plumbing fixtures beyond that listed in the quality classification. See the cost of these items on pages 27
    to 31.

    Square Foot Area

    Quality Class 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 1,300 1,400 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 2,000

    1, Luxury 504.17 483.07 465.64 450.58 438.86 428.39 419.12 410.79 404.55 398.43 392.86 388.12 379.29
    1, & 2 438.42 420.06 404.90 391.82 381.63 372.46 364.48 357.19 351.79 346.49 341.55 337.44 329.80
    2, Semi-Luxury 306.41 293.59 282.99 273.83 266.71 260.36 254.74 249.68 245.87 242.04 238.74 235.91 230.46
    2 & 3 224.91 215.54 207.73 201.05 195.82 191.12 186.98 183.27 180.44 177.71 175.19 173.17 169.19
    3, Best Std. 196.25 188.10 181.26 175.46 170.80 166.76 163.17 159.95 157.48 155.11 152.94 151.07 147.63
    3 & 4 167.84 160.73 154.96 150.03 146.03 142.56 139.52 136.69 134.65 132.49 130.75 129.15 126.27
    4, Good Std. 144.62 138.45 133.53 129.23 125.88 122.88 120.17 117.77 115.94 114.21 112.63 111.16 108.77
    4 & 5 130.26 124.78 120.34 116.42 113.36 110.60 108.20 106.14 104.47 102.87 101.47 100.26 97.91
    5 Avg. Std. 117.23 112.38 108.31 104.85 102.14 99.67 97.51 95.50 94.05 92.62 91.34 90.25 88.18
    5 & 6 101.79 97.53 94.02 91.01 88.60 86.48 84.60 82.87 81.65 80.37 79.40 78.33 76.55
    6, Min. Std. 92.54 88.65 85.45 82.70 80.55 78.60 76.92 75.38 74.21 73.06 72.12 71.18 69.54

    Square Foot Area

    Quality Class 2,200 2,400 2,600 2,800 3,000 3,200 3,400 3,600 4,000 4,200 4,400 4,600 5,000

    1, Luxury 372.68 366.43 361.39 356.89 353.71 350.74 347.53 345.19 340.34 337.26 334.56 332.23 328.90
    1, & 2 324.15 318.64 314.24 310.34 307.55 305.00 302.21 300.15 295.96 293.26 290.92 288.89 286.01
    2, Semi-Luxury 226.63 222.69 219.65 216.91 214.93 213.11 211.17 209.79 206.84 204.96 203.31 201.91 199.89
    2 & 3 166.28 163.49 161.24 159.24 157.76 156.39 155.05 153.98 151.84 150.47 149.25 148.21 146.73
    3, Best Std. 145.11 142.63 140.64 138.97 137.71 136.54 135.29 134.35 132.47 132.49 131.42 130.51 129.21
    3 & 4 124.07 121.98 120.33 118.85 117.71 116.67 115.72 114.93 113.31 112.30 111.38 110.61 109.50
    4, Good Std. 106.90 105.06 103.68 102.34 101.47 100.56 99.69 98.93 97.59 96.71 95.91 95.26 94.31
    4 & 5 96.26 94.69 93.25 92.19 91.32 90.61 89.69 89.16 87.95 87.14 86.47 85.85 85.00
    5 Avg. Std. 86.69 85.28 84.09 82.95 82.29 81.56 80.82 80.27 79.17 78.02 77.84 77.31 76.55
    5 & 6 75.26 74.01 72.96 72.04 71.45 70.74 70.10 69.60 68.72 68.02 67.58 67.05 66.44
    6, Min. Std. 68.32 67.23 66.34 65.55 64.93 64.34 63.79 63.31 62.46 61.82 61.42 60.95 60.38

    Note: Tract work and highly repetitive jobs may reduce the cost 8 to 12%. Add 4% to the square foot cost of floors above the
    second floor level. Work outside metropolitan areas may cost 2 to 6% less. When the exterior walls are masonry, add 9 to
    10% for class 2 and 1 structures and 5 to 8% for class 3, 4, 5 and 6 structures. The building area includes all full story (7’6″ to
    9′ high) areas within and including the exterior walls of all floor areas of the building, including small inset areas such as
    entrances outside the exterior wall but under the main roof. For areas with a ceiling height of less than 80″, see the section on
    half-story areas on page 30.

    Single Family Residence, Class 4 Single Family Residence, Class 6

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Single Family Residences

    Residential Structures Section 13

    6 Corners (Classes 3, 4, 5, and 6) or
    Two Building Masses (Classes 1 and 2 Only)

    Estimating Procedure
    1. Establish the structure quality class by applying the information on page 11.
    2. Multiply the structure floor area (excluding the garage) by the appropriate square foot cost below.
    3. Multiply the total from step 2 by the correct location factor listed on page 7 or 8.
    4. Add, when appropriate, the cost of a porch, garage, heating and cooling equipment, basement, fireplace, carport,
    appliances and plumbing fixtures beyond that listed in the quality classification. See the cost of these items on pages 27
    to 31.

    Square Foot Area
    Quality Class 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 1,300 1,400 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 2,000

    1, Luxury 513.86 492.34 474.59 459.24 447.32 436.94 428.39 419.94 413.28 407.20 401.63 396.66 388.21
    1, & 2 446.83 428.14 412.69 399.34 388.94 379.87 372.46 365.19 359.38 354.08 349.30 344.94 337.56
    2, Semi-Luxury 312.36 299.29 288.22 279.53 271.82 265.52 260.36 255.21 251.13 247.43 244.13 241.03 235.97
    2 & 3 229.26 219.69 211.56 205.20 199.51 194.86 191.12 187.34 184.33 181.63 179.18 176.88 173.19
    3, Best Std. 200.06 191.68 184.63 179.00 174.13 170.07 166.76 163.49 160.92 158.49 156.36 154.45 151.13
    3 & 4 171.04 163.95 157.78 153.09 148.93 145.35 142.64 139.76 137.63 135.47 133.71 131.98 129.17
    4, Good Std. 147.39 141.24 135.96 131.87 128.28 125.27 122.88 120.43 118.44 116.75 115.27 113.76 111.25
    4 & 5 132.83 127.25 122.40 118.78 115.51 112.80 110.60 108.43 106.81 105.14 103.79 102.44 100.31
    5 Avg. Std. 119.57 114.61 110.27 107.00 104.07 101.57 99.67 97.79 96.22 94.74 93.45 92.27 90.26
    5 & 6 103.78 99.39 95.76 92.88 90.25 88.11 86.48 84.79 83.43 82.20 81.10 80.00 78.38
    6, Min. Std. 94.38 90.44 87.04 84.40 82.08 80.17 78.60 77.08 75.80 74.67 73.68 72.76 71.22

    Square Foot Area
    Quality Class 2,200 2,400 2,600 2,800 3,000 3,200 3,400 3,600 4,000 4,200 4,400 4,600 5,000

    1, Luxury 381.95 376.08 370.85 366.43 362.86 359.36 356.41 353.71 350.00 346.85 344.07 343.00 339.57
    1, & 2 332.13 327.09 322.54 318.64 315.57 312.44 309.94 307.55 304.41 301.65 300.62 298.51 295.52
    2, Semi-Luxury 232.22 228.52 225.36 222.69 220.48 218.36 216.59 214.93 212.72 210.80 209.10 207.65 205.56
    2 & 3 170.40 167.75 165.46 163.49 161.86 160.28 158.99 157.76 156.11 154.94 153.02 151.85 150.79
    3, Best Std. 148.66 146.39 144.31 142.63 141.30 139.87 138.74 137.71 136.25 135.03 133.94 133.01 131.67
    3 & 4 127.11 125.16 123.39 121.98 120.74 119.55 118.57 117.71 116.42 115.36 114.45 113.66 112.52
    4, Good Std. 109.51 107.78 106.30 105.06 104.04 102.99 102.23 101.47 100.38 99.49 98.71 97.99 97.02
    4 & 5 98.67 97.07 95.76 94.69 93.65 92.80 92.05 91.32 90.41 89.60 88.88 88.25 87.37
    5 Avg. Std. 88.81 87.45 86.32 85.28 84.37 83.57 82.88 82.29 81.42 80.69 80.02 79.49 78.67
    5 & 6 77.08 75.80 74.79 74.01 73.21 72.57 71.97 71.45 70.61 69.97 69.41 68.95 68.24
    6, Min. Std. 70.07 69.01 68.05 67.23 66.59 65.94 65.40 64.93 64.22 63.63 63.14 62.69 62.06

    Note: Tract work and highly repetitive jobs may reduce the cost 8 to 12%. Add 4% to the square foot cost of floors above the
    second floor level. Work outside metropolitan areas may cost 2 to 6% less. When the exterior walls are masonry, add 9 to
    10% for class 2 and 1 structures and 5 to 8% for class 3, 4, 5 and 6 structures. The building area includes all full story (7’6″ to
    9′ high) areas within and including the exterior walls of all floor areas of the building, including small inset areas such as
    entrances outside the exterior wall but under the main roof. For areas with a ceiling height of less than 80″, see the section on
    half-story areas on page 30.

    Single Family Residence, Class 5 Single Family Residence, Class 5

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Single Family Residences

    14 Residential Structures Section

    8 Corners (Classes 3, 4, 5, and 6) or
    Three Building Masses (Classes 1 and 2 only)

    Estimating Procedure
    1. Establish the structure quality class by applying the information on page 11.
    2. Multiply the structure floor area (excluding the garage) by the appropriate square foot cost below.
    3. Multiply the total from step 2 by the correct location factor listed on page 7 or 8.
    4. Add, when appropriate, the cost of a porch, garage, heating and cooling equipment, basement, fireplace, carport,
    appliances and plumbing fixtures beyond that listed in the quality classification. See the cost of these items on pages 27
    to 31.

    Square Foot Area
    Quality Class 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 1,300 1,400 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 2,000

    1, Luxury 524.31 502.69 484.07 468.83 456.39 446.11 436.94 428.68 421.33 415.70 410.29 405.57 397.13
    1, & 2 455.89 437.19 420.91 407.72 396.83 387.92 379.87 372.82 366.40 361.48 356.77 352.66 345.38
    2, Semi-Luxury 317.46 304.53 293.73 284.72 277.34 271.09 265.49 260.52 256.06 252.63 249.38 246.43 241.36
    2 & 3 233.05 223.53 215.57 208.97 203.59 199.00 194.86 191.23 187.97 185.46 183.00 180.93 177.18
    3, Best Std. 203.36 195.07 188.17 182.40 177.64 173.67 170.07 166.85 164.02 161.85 159.71 157.94 154.63
    3 & 4 173.84 166.74 160.79 155.86 151.85 148.52 145.35 142.71 140.18 138.38 136.54 135.00 132.18
    4, Good Std. 149.79 143.64 138.56 134.39 130.75 127.93 125.27 122.98 120.80 119.28 117.62 116.30 113.87
    4 & 5 134.96 129.45 124.79 121.05 117.77 115.18 112.80 110.81 108.82 107.38 105.95 104.73 102.53
    5 Avg. Std. 121.53 116.56 112.42 109.01 106.09 103.79 101.57 99.77 97.92 96.72 95.40 94.41 92.36
    5 & 6 105.46 101.15 97.54 94.57 92.09 90.10 88.11 86.58 85.05 83.93 82.81 81.85 80.17
    6, Min. Std. 95.86 91.97 88.67 85.98 83.67 81.85 80.17 78.73 77.30 76.29 75.31 72.62 71.27

    Square Foot Area
    Quality Class 2,200 2,400 2,600 2,800 3,000 3,200 3,400 3,600 4,000 4,200 4,400 4,600 5,000

    1, Luxury 390.45 389.61 379.29 375.36 371.85 368.73 365.03 362.96 358.43 355.21 352.35 349.90 346.40
    1, & 2 339.52 332.13 329.80 326.39 323.35 320.66 317.40 315.67 311.78 308.95 306.47 304.32 301.29
    2, Semi-Luxury 237.24 232.22 230.46 228.10 226.08 224.10 221.79 220.52 217.87 215.94 214.19 212.72 210.55
    2 & 3 174.15 170.40 169.19 167.45 165.89 164.51 162.83 161.92 159.95 158.51 157.25 156.15 154.60
    3, Best Std. 151.95 148.66 147.63 146.11 144.74 143.54 142.11 141.31 140.76 139.52 138.43 137.47 136.08
    3 & 4 129.80 127.11 126.27 124.89 123.77 122.76 121.54 120.80 119.35 118.27 117.34 116.51 115.33
    4, Good Std. 111.95 109.51 108.77 107.65 106.65 105.84 104.73 104.05 102.83 101.88 101.08 100.35 99.37
    4 & 5 100.87 98.67 97.91 96.94 96.13 95.27 94.21 93.76 92.62 91.26 90.51 89.88 88.98
    5 Avg. Std. 90.81 88.81 88.18 87.33 86.47 85.78 84.93 84.47 83.40 82.67 81.99 81.42 80.62
    5 & 6 78.86 77.08 76.55 75.75 75.11 74.44 73.67 73.24 72.42 71.78 71.19 70.69 69.99
    6, Min. Std. 70.08 68.62 68.14 67.50 66.89 66.33 65.71 65.29 64.57 63.99 63.49 64.11 62.41

    Note: Tract work and highly repetitive jobs may reduce the cost 8 to 12%. Add 4% to the square foot cost of floors above the
    second floor level. Work outside metropolitan areas may cost 2 to 6% less. When the exterior walls are masonry, add 9 to
    10% for class 2 and 1 structures and 5 to 8% for class 3, 4, 5 and 6 structures. The building area includes all full story (7’6″ to
    9′ high) areas within and including the exterior walls of all floor areas of the building, including small inset areas such as
    entrances outside the exterior wall but under the main roof. For areas with a ceiling height of less than 80″, see the section on
    half-story areas on page 30.

    Single Family Residence, Class 1 Single Family Residence, Class 2 & 3

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Single Family Residences

    Residential Structures Section 15

    10 Corners (Classes 3, 4, 5 and 6) or
    Four Building Masses (Classes 1 and 2 only)

    Estimating Procedure
    1. Establish the structure quality class by applying the information on page 11.
    2. Multiply the structure floor area (excluding the garage) by the appropriate square foot cost below.
    3. Multiply the total from step 2 by the correct location factor listed on page 7 or 8.
    4. Add, when appropriate, the cost of a porch, garage, heating and cooling equipment, basement, fireplace, carport,
    appliances and plumbing fixtures beyond that listed in the quality classification. See the cost of these items on pages 27
    to 31.

    Square Foot Area
    Quality Class 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 1,300 1,400 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 2,000

    1, Luxury 535.27 512.88 494.35 479.75 465.95 455.15 446.24 438.69 431.34 425.28 419.94 415.05 406.35
    1, & 2 465.47 446.10 429.91 417.20 405.17 395.83 388.02 381.50 375.07 370.26 365.21 360.94 353.36
    2, Semi-Luxury 322.50 309.72 299.30 290.14 283.18 276.62 271.20 266.61 262.15 258.45 255.21 252.19 246.92
    2 & 3 236.76 227.38 219.71 213.04 207.85 203.04 199.03 195.65 192.43 189.63 187.34 185.11 181.27
    3, Best Std. 206.59 198.38 191.72 185.86 181.36 177.22 173.71 170.76 167.95 165.54 163.49 161.59 158.16
    3 & 4 176.64 169.49 163.95 158.92 155.11 151.45 148.54 145.97 143.52 141.52 139.76 138.16 135.29
    4, Good Std. 152.22 146.14 141.33 136.93 133.54 130.53 127.93 125.85 123.67 121.98 120.43 118.98 116.54
    4 & 5 137.09 131.62 127.27 123.36 120.37 117.59 115.27 113.33 111.44 109.91 108.43 107.16 105.00
    5 Avg. Std. 123.49 118.45 114.65 111.10 108.39 105.94 103.83 102.05 100.38 98.89 97.79 96.56 94.57
    5 & 6 107.10 102.85 99.41 96.41 94.05 91.89 90.14 88.56 87.05 85.83 84.79 83.69 82.08
    6, Min. Std. 97.43 93.49 90.45 87.66 85.49 83.53 81.88 80.53 79.12 77.98 77.08 76.12 74.58

    Square Foot Area
    Quality Class 2,200 2,400 2,600 2,800 3,000 3,200 3,400 3,600 4,000 4,200 4,400 4,600 5,000

    1, Luxury 399.80 398.04 388.67 384.00 380.64 377.52 374.44 371.99 367.22 363.91 360.99 358.47 354.83
    1, & 2 347.67 342.42 338.02 333.88 331.10 328.28 325.64 323.46 319.42 315.63 313.13 310.97 307.89
    2, Semi-Luxury 242.94 239.32 236.19 233.41 231.36 229.41 227.57 226.13 223.19 221.20 219.39 217.87 215.68
    2 & 3 178.32 175.62 173.37 171.32 169.79 168.43 167.02 165.93 163.86 157.43 156.19 155.08 153.54
    3, Best Std. 155.63 153.33 151.34 149.47 148.16 146.91 145.74 144.81 143.00 141.71 140.57 139.59 138.19
    3 & 4 133.01 131.07 129.37 127.83 126.70 125.60 124.66 123.80 122.15 121.07 120.10 119.27 118.06
    4, Good Std. 114.65 112.95 111.57 110.07 109.12 108.21 107.38 106.81 105.32 104.38 103.18 102.11 101.09
    4 & 5 103.33 101.70 100.40 99.18 98.31 97.51 96.72 96.14 94.82 93.97 93.21 92.58 91.63
    5 Avg. Std. 92.92 91.60 90.44 89.33 88.49 87.85 87.10 86.62 85.38 84.60 83.93 83.34 82.52
    5 & 6 80.69 79.50 78.43 77.48 76.76 76.21 75.60 75.12 74.14 73.48 72.88 72.37 71.66
    6, Min. Std. 73.39 72.23 71.34 70.45 69.83 69.30 68.72 68.29 67.40 66.79 66.26 65.78 65.15

    Note: Tract work and highly repetitive jobs may reduce the cost 8 to 12%. Add 4% to the square foot cost of floors above the
    second floor level. Work outside metropolitan areas may cost 2 to 6% less. When the exterior walls are masonry, add 9 to
    10% for class 2 and 1 structures and 5 to 8% for class 3, 4, 5 and 6 structures. The building area includes all full story (7’6″ to
    9′ high) areas within and including the exterior walls of all floor areas of the building, including small inset areas such as
    entrances outside the exterior wall but under the main roof. For areas with a ceiling height of less than 80″, see the section on
    half-story areas on page 30.

    Single Family Residence, Class 2 & 3 Single Family Residence, Class 1

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Manufactured Housing

    16 Residential Structures Section 16

    Quality Classification

    Class 1
    Best Quality

    Class 2
    Good Quality

    Class 3
    Average Quality

    Class 4
    Low Quality

    Class 5
    Lowest Quality

    Roof
    (11% of total
    cost)

    Gable accented roof; asphalt
    shingles; min roof pitch of
    3″ in 12″; front and rear
    overhangs

    One piece white baked
    enamel; asphalt shingles,
    gable accents; front and rear
    overhangs

    One piece white baked
    enamel metal; asphalt
    shingles on gable accented
    roof

    One piece fabricated
    steel; minimum pitch;
    small overhang in front; or
    asphalt shingles

    Painted lightweight
    galvanized steel with
    minimum pitch; or
    asphalt shingles

    Exterior
    Walls
    (16% of total
    cost)

    Pre-finished shiplap aluminum
    siding or 1/2″ masonite siding;
    stone accent; matching
    skirting; coordinated exterior
    colors; 6″ exterior wall
    construction

    Pre-finished shiplap alum.
    siding or flush-type masonite
    with concealed fasteners;
    coordinated exterior colors;
    exterior walls 4″ thick;
    aluminum skirting

    Pre-finished aluminum
    siding and/or flush-type
    masonite panels with
    concealed fasteners;
    4″ exterior wall thickness;
    aluminum skirting

    Covering is pre-finished
    aluminum siding or flush-
    type masonite panels with
    some concealed
    fasteners; exterior wall
    thickness is 3″ to 4″;
    skirting is lightweight

    Pre-finished aluminum
    panels with exposed
    hex-heads; panels of
    modified corrugated
    pattern; exterior wall
    thickness 3″ to 4″;
    lightweight skirting

    Trim and
    Sash
    (8% of total
    cost)

    Painted aluminum and/or
    imitation stone trim; many
    sash; picture/bay windows;
    sliding glass doors; recessed
    entry; dual glazed vinyl
    windows

    Painted aluminum and/or
    imitation stone (fiberglass)
    trim; large amount of good
    house-type sash; picture
    windows; sliding glass door;
    recessed entry

    Little or no trim; two-tone
    exterior coverings; large,
    good, house-type sash;
    some picture windows;
    optional 6′ sliding glass
    door

    No trim; exterior
    decoration two types of
    color; coordinated exterior
    covering; tract house
    windows; optional 6′
    sliding glass door

    No ornamental trim;
    minimum window area
    and sash

    Interior
    (5% of total
    cost)

    Expensive hardwood
    paneling/gypsum board;
    careful workmanship
    throughout; coffered/
    vaulted/beamed ceiling;
    plank-type acoustical tile;
    8′ min ceiling; mirrored walls;
    built-in buffet cabinet; custom
    drapes; raised panel doors;
    skylights; window sills

    Pre-finished and grooved
    hardwood paneling or
    gypsum board; careful
    workmanship throughout;
    vaulted/beamed, ceilings;
    8′ min ceiling height; floor to
    ceiling drapes over sheer
    underlays in living room and
    dining room; raised panel
    doors; window sills

    Pre-finished and grooved
    hardwood, plywood
    paneling, or gypsum board;
    8′ acoustical plank-type
    ceilings; decorator
    coordinated drapes in all
    rooms except kitchen and
    baths; optional vaulted
    ceilings with decorative
    beams

    Pre-finished fire rated
    plywood paneling or
    partial gypsum board;
    acoustical tile ceiling,
    8′ height; drapes in living
    room, dining room, and
    bedrooms

    Walls are pre-finished
    3/16″ fire rated
    paneling; hardboard or
    firtex ceiling cover with
    exposed fasteners
    and/or stapled holding
    strips; 7′ 6″ ceiling
    heights

    Floors
    (7% of total
    cost)

    Hardwood or ceramic tile
    entry, deluxe carpet; vinyl tile
    in utility and guest bath. Good
    tile or hardwood flooring in
    kitchen.

    Carpet with 1/2″ thick pads
    in all rooms except guest
    bath and utility room; vinyl
    tile in kitchen, utility, and
    guest bath

    Carpet with 1/2″ thick pad
    in all rooms except baths
    and kitchen; vinyl in kitchen
    and baths

    Carpet with 1/2″ thick pad
    in living, dining, and
    bedrooms; vinyl in other
    areas

    Vinyl; lightweight carpet
    in living room and
    master bedroom only

    Heating
    (6% of total
    cost)

    110,000 BTU upflow air-
    condition-ready forced air
    furnace with exterior access
    door; ducting to all rooms;
    optional air conditioning and
    fireplace; dual-zone heating in
    larger units

    80,000 to 110,000 BTU
    upflow or downflow air-
    condition-ready furnace with
    exterior access door; ducting
    to all rooms; optional air
    conditioning and fireplace

    80,000 BTU upflow or
    downflow forced air
    furnace; ducting to all
    rooms; optional air
    conditioning and fireplace

    Forced air furnace;
    ducting in all rooms;
    perimeter floor return
    system; optional air
    conditioning

    Forced air furnace;
    minimum ducting and
    outlets

    Kitchen
    (21% of total
    cost)

    18± linear foot plastic
    laminate or ceramic tile
    counter top; quality wood
    cabinets and hardware;
    dropped luminous ceiling;
    island work space; walk-in
    pantry; good quality vinyl tile

    Circular or elaborate kitchen;
    walk-in pantry; 16± linear
    feet of plastic laminate
    counter; quality wood
    cabinets; dropped luminous
    ceiling; island work space;
    microwave oven

    14± linear foot plastic
    laminate counter; good
    quality cabinets; built-in
    range and oven with a hood
    and fan; optional
    dishwasher and pantry

    12± linear foot plastic
    laminate counter; average
    quality plywood cabinets
    with raised panel doors;
    built-in range and oven,
    hood and fan; optional
    dishwasher

    10± linear foot plastic
    laminate counter;
    minimum quality
    plywood cabinets; built-
    in or drop-in range and
    oven

    Baths and
    Plumbing
    (13% of total
    cost)

    2 to 2¾ baths; 8 fixtures;
    master bath with two basins,
    sunken tub, fiberglass shower
    with glass door; quality
    medicine cabinets; 4± feet of
    mirror over 8± feet of cultured
    marble or ceramic tile lavatory
    top; decorative faucets; 40-
    gal. water heater; separate
    commode closet

    2 baths; vent fans; master
    bath will have two basins,
    sunken tub, and stall shower;
    quality medicine cabinets
    and fixtures; cultured marble
    vanities; good cabinets;
    fiberglass shower in guest
    bath; 30- to 40-gallon water
    heater; separate commode
    closet

    2 baths; vent fans;
    fiberglass shower with
    glass or plastic door;
    fiberglass or enameled
    steel tub; 6 to 8 linear foot
    cultured marble vanity, twin
    basin master bath; good
    cabinets; 30- to 40-gallon
    water heater

    1¾ baths; fiberglass
    shower with glass or
    plastic door; fiberglass
    or enameled steel tub;
    4 to 5 linear foot cultured
    marble vanity single
    basin; average quality
    cabinets; 30-gallon hot
    water heater

    One bath; fiberglass tub
    or shower with curtain;
    small 4′ plastic marble
    vanity; minimum quality
    cabinets

    Bedrooms
    (4% of total
    cost)

    9 to 14 linear foot floor-to-
    ceiling sliding mirrored
    wardrobe doors, or large walk-
    in closets

    9 to 14 linear foot floor-to-
    ceiling mirrored sliding
    wardrobe doors in master
    bedroom, or walk-in closets

    10± linear foot wardrobe;
    floor-to-ceiling mirrored
    sliding doors in master
    bedroom

    8± linear foot wardrobe;
    pre-finished and grooved
    plywood doors; mirrored
    wardrobe door in master
    bedroom

    Five to six linear foot
    wardrobe; plain plywood
    sliding doors

    Exterior
    features
    (9% of total
    cost)

    Set on concrete and/or metal
    piers; axle and wheel
    assembly for each towable
    section

    Set on concrete and/or metal
    piers; axle and wheel
    assembly for each towable
    section

    Set on concrete and/or
    metal piers; axle and wheel
    assembly for each towable
    section

    Set on concrete and/or
    metal piers; axle and
    wheel assembly for each
    towable section

    Set on concrete and/or
    metal piers; axle and
    wheel assembly for each
    towable section
    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Manufactured Housing

    Residential Structures Section 17

    A manufactured home is a structure in one or more
    sections that is transportable, with or without a permanent
    foundation. No recreational vehicle or method of
    transporting is included in these costs. They can be from
    8 to 36 feet wide and up to 80 feet long. Manufactured
    homes assembled from two or three attached sections
    are referred to as double wide or triple wide.

    Tip-out, expando, or tag-a-long units have one or
    more telescoping or attached rooms to the side. All
    sections are to be included in the total square footage
    computations.

    Area modification factors should not be used when
    computing the cost of manufactured housing.

    Estimating Procedure
    1. Establish the structure quality class by applying the information on page 16.
    2. Multiply the structure floor area (excluding the garage) by the appropriate square foot cost below.
    3. Add, when appropriate, the cost of foundation, air conditioning, built-ins, porch, skirting, tie-downs, carport, screen walls
    and roof snow load capability. See the following page.

    Square Foot Area

    Quality Class 500 700 900 1100 1300 1500 1700 1900 2100 2300 2500

    1, Best 108.51 107.16 105.84 104.47 103.14 101.79 100.48 99.10 97.79 96.46 95.10
    1, & 2 102.15 100.80 99.49 98.20 96.78 95.43 94.05 92.78 91.41 90.11 88.74
    2, Good 95.74 94.42 93.10 89.20 87.95 86.68 85.30 84.04 82.68 81.43 80.14
    2 & 3 89.45 88.05 86.76 81.50 80.20 78.94 77.66 76.40 75.11 73.80 72.59
    3, Average 83.39 82.10 80.64 75.75 72.36 71.07 69.89 68.65 67.39 66.18 64.91
    3 & 4 78.03 76.66 75.38 70.69 67.39 66.18 64.91 63.66 62.41 61.18 59.91
    4, Low Average 72.65 71.35 69.99 65.55 62.41 61.18 59.91 58.67 57.46 56.20 54.96
    4 & 5 68.30 66.91 65.62 61.34 58.37 57.14 55.92 54.66 53.43 52.21 50.89
    5 Lowest 64.26 62.97 61.62 55.92 54.66 53.43 52.21 50.89 49.66 48.45 47.22

    Manufactured Housing, Class 4 Manufactured Housing, Class 5

    Manufactured Housing, Class 1 Manufactured Housing, Class 3

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Manufactured Housing

    18 Residential Structures Section 18

    Additional Costs

    Permanent Foundation
    Single Story
    Less than 1,000 square feet of floor area $8,260 to $14,430
    Over 1,000 square feet to 1,800 square feet of floor area $14,430 to $26,320
    Over 1,800 square feet to 2,500 square feet of floor area $26,320 to $43,200
    For two-story units, use the footprint of the first floor and select a figure higher in the range of costs. For difficult site
    conditions, such as a high water table, heavy clay soil, over 3′ foundation depth or a sloping site, use a figure in the higher
    range of costs.

    Air Conditioning
    Central air for use by existing furnace and ducts
    2 ton, up to 1,100 S.F. $3,565
    2-1/2 to 3 ton, over 1,100 to 1,600 S.F. $4,090
    4 to 5 ton, over 1,600 to 2,500 S.F. $4,490 to $5,290.
    Cost per unit
    Thru-wall small unit 1/2 H.P., 6,000 Btu $1,240
    Thru-wall large unit 1 H.P., 12,000 Btu $1,645
    Evaporative cooler, roof mounted $1,170 to $1,850
    Wiring for air conditioning $225 to $474

    Built-Ins
    Dishwasher (included in classes 1, 2 & 3) $940 – $1,250
    Garbage disposal (included in all base cost, deduct if
    missing) $190 – $1,160
    Built-in microwave oven $525 – $730
    Trash compactor $855 – $1,080
    Wet bar (walk-up – if not included in class) $750 – $900
    Wet bar (walk behind – if not included in class)
    $2,465 – $2,690
    Separate shower in master bath $855 – $1,080
    One-half bath: toilet, sink, and pullman $1,695 – $1,800
    Bathroom sink or laundry sink $360
    Fireplace (permanent – includes flue) $3,300 – $4,485
    Fireplace (free standing – includes flue) $1,505 – $2,695
    Built-in buffet-hutch (included in classes 1 and 2)
    $1,140 – $1,435
    Whirlpool tub in master bath $1,380 – $1,685

    Porches and Decks (no roofs included)
    Wood deck at home floor level with handrail, skirting,
    steps and outdoor carpet, per square foot of porch
    or deck $18.38 to $25.76

    Skirting, cost per linear foot of skirt
    Lightweight aluminum panels $8.38
    Lap aluminum siding $14.95
    Painted hardboard panels $19.19
    Flagstone-type aluminum panels $14.95
    Concrete composite panels $25.05 – $31.31
    Vinyl panels $16.67
    Brick or stone $26.26

    Storage Buildings, per S.F. of floor

    Aluminum exterior $20.01
    Enameled steel exterior $16.06
    Hardboard panel exterior $35.05

    Tie Downs

    Cork screw anchor and straps, per each $105 – $155

    Steps And Rails, per flight to 36″ high

    Fiberglass steps $265 – $415
    Handrail $60 – $90

    Upgraded Components

    Upgraded Carpets $1,575 – $3,920
    Upgraded Drapes $1,620 – $3,365

    Carport, Porch, or Deck Roof, per S.F.
    covered

    Aluminum supports and roof cover, free standing
    $15.05 – $20.00
    Aluminum supports and roof cover, attached to house
    $9.70 – $14.05
    Wood supports and enameled steel cover, free standing
    $17.65 – $22.00

    Screen Wall Enclosure, per linear foot of 8′
    wall

    Wood frame with screen walls and door $69.00
    Wood or aluminum frame with screen and glass walls,
    with door $120.00

    Roof Snowload Capability
    Cost per square foot of roof
    30 pound design load $.76 – $1.21
    40 pound design load $1.20 – $2.18
    50 pound design load $2.18 – $2.89
    60 pound design load $2.88 – $3.85
    80 pound design load $3.65 – $5.80
    100 pound design load $4.81 – $6.65
    175 pound design load $6.10 – $7.35

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Multi-Family Residences – Apartments

    Residential Structures Section 19

    Quality Classification
    Class 3 Class 4
    Class 1 Class 2 High Average Low Average Class 5
    Best Quality Good Quality Quality Quality Minimum Quality

    Foundation Conventional crawl space Conventional crawl space Conventional crawl space, Concrete slab or crawl Concrete slab.
    (9% of total cost) built on a sloping site. built on a sloping site. footing over 40″ deep. space with 30″ footing.

    Floor Engineered wood, steel Engineered wood or steel Standard wood frame with Standard wood frame Simple slab on grade
    Structure or concrete exceeding built to meet code irregular shape and changes or concrete slab, with no changes in
    (12% of total cost) code requirements, complex requirements, changes in in elevation. simple floor plan. elevation.
    plan, changes in elevation. shape and elevation.

    Walls and Complex wood or light Wood or light steel Wood or light steel frame, Wood frame, some Wood frame, little
    Exterior steel frame, stone or frame, masonry veneer decorative trim at entrance, ornamental details or no ornamentation,
    Finish masonry veneer, at entrance, good wood plywood or stucco siding, at entrance, plywood inexpensive stucco or
    (12% of total cost) 10′ average wall height. or stucco siding. simple framing plan. or hardboard siding. hardboard siding.

    Roof & Cover Complex roof plan, Good insulation, 4-ply built-up roof, 4-ply built-up roof, 4-ply built-up roof
    (10% of total cost) good insulation, tile good shake, tile or some portions heavy some portions shake or minimum grade
    or good shake cover. 5-ply built-up roof. shake or tile. or composition shingles. composition single.

    Windows and Many large, good quality Large, good-quality Good quality vinyl or Standard residential- Minimum grade
    Doors vinyl or metal windows, vinyl or metal windows, metal windows, grade doors and doors and windows.
    (5% of total cost) architectural grade doors. commercial grade doors. residential grade doors. windows.

    Interior Gypsum board with heavy Textured gypsum board, Textured 1/2″ gypsum Textured 1/2″ gypsum 1/2″ gypsum board
    Finish texture or plaster, some some paneled walls, board, several irregular walls board, some wall-cover with smooth finish,
    (8% of total cost) paneled walls, cathedral decorative or stain grade or wall openings, few or hardboard paneling, no ornamental details,
    ceiling at entry, built-in trim at entrance or living ornamental details, most walls are rectangular, doors and windows
    cases, several wall offsets room, several irregular standard grade trim and standard grade trim and are the only wall
    and level changes. walls and wall openings. wall molding. wall molding. openings.

    Floor Finish Masonry or stone tile entry, Masonry or tile at entry, Hardwood or tile at entry, Average quality carpet Minimum carpet
    (5% of total cost) good hardwood or deluxe hardwood or good carpet standard carpet in most or hardwood in most or resilient tile
    carpet in most rooms, good in most rooms, sheet rooms, sheet vinyl in rooms, sheet vinyl or throughout.
    sheet vinyl in other rooms. vinyl in other rooms. kitchen and bath. resilient tile in kitchen.

    Interior Breakfast bar or nook, Formal dining room Separate dining Dining area is in the Dining area is part
    Features formal dining room, one ample closet space area, good closet kitchen, small closet of kitchen, minimum
    (5% of total cost) walk-in closet, linen closet linen closet and utility space, linen closet in each bedroom, closet space,
    utility room or pantry. closet, extra shelving. and small utility closet. linen closet. minimum shelving.

    Bath Detail Good tile shower, 8′ Tile shower, 6′ vanity Better vanity cabinet Good vanity cabinet, Vanity and one small
    (4% of total cost) simulated marble top. cabinet and top. and good wall cabinet. good medicine cabinet. medicine cabinet.

    Kitchen 16 LF of better hardwood 12 LF of good hardwood 8 LF of standard hardwood 6 LF of low-cost 5 LF of low-cost.
    (8% of total cost) wall and base cabinets, wall and base cabinets, wall and base cabinets, wall and base cabinets, wall & base cabinets,
    synthetic stone top, 6 very tile or acrylic top, 5 acrylic top, 4 standard laminate counter top, 4 laminate counter top,
    good built-in appliances. good built-in appliances. grade built-in appliances. standard grade appliances. low cost appliances.

    Electrical Ample recessed lighting, Recessed lighting in most Recessed lighting in kitchen Low-cost recessed lighting Fluorescent ceiling
    (10% of total cost) task lighting in kitchen and rooms, good task lighting in and living room, switched in kitchen and living room, fixture in kitchen,
    bath, security & computer, kitchen & bath, security & receptacles in bedrooms, switched receptacles in switched receptacles
    networks, good chandelier. computer networks. wired for cable TV. other rooms, cable TV. in other rooms.

    Plumbing Four excellent fixtures per Three good fixtures per Three standard fixtures per Three low cost fixtures Three minimum-grade
    (12% of total cost) bathroom, copper bathroom, copper supply bathroom, copper supply per bathroom, plastic fixtures per bathroom,
    supply and drain lines. and drain lines. and plastic drain lines. supply and drain lines. plastic supply & drains.

    Plumbing costs assume 1 bathroom per unit. See page 30 for the costs of additional bathrooms.

    For Masonry Good textured block, tile Colored or detailed block Colored concrete block, Colored concrete Concrete block or
    Walls or decorative brick. tile or decorative brick. tile or decorative brick. block or brick. common brick.

    When masonry walls are used in lieu of wood or light steel frame walls, add 9% to the appropriate S.F. cost.

    Note: Use the percent of total cost to help identify the correct quality classification. Exceptional class multi-family residences have architectural details and features
    uncommon in conventional apartment buildings. Many exceptional class multi-family structures are designed for sale or conversion to condominium ownership.

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Multi-Family Residences – Apartments

    20 Residential Structures Section

    2 or 3 Units

    Estimating Procedure
    1. Establish the structure quality class by applying the information on page 19.
    2. Multiply the average unit area by the appropriate square foot cost below. The average unit area is found by dividing the

    building area on all floors by the number of units in the building. The building area should include office and
    utility rooms, interior hallways and interior stairways.

    3. Multiply the total from step 2 by the correct location factor listed on page 7 or 8.
    4. Add, when appropriate, the cost of balconies, porches, garages, heating and cooling equipment, basements,

    fireplaces, carports, appliances and plumbing fixtures beyond that listed in the quality classification. See the cost
    of these items on pages 27 to 31.

    5. Costs assume one bathroom per unit. Add the cost of additional bathrooms from page 30.

    Average Unit Area in Square Feet

    Quality Class 400 450 500 550 600 650 700 750 800 900 1,000

    Exceptional 221.89 212.17 206.88 202.16 198.57 195.29 192.84 190.02 188.38 185.13 182.10
    1, Best 194.94 186.35 181.71 177.59 174.35 171.59 169.43 166.94 165.51 162.55 160.01
    1, & 2 170.96 163.43 159.33 155.68 152.96 150.49 148.54 146.49 145.12 142.49 140.25
    2, Good 149.59 143.07 139.44 136.33 133.86 131.63 130.01 128.16 126.99 124.72 122.77
    2 & 3 136.81 130.76 127.59 124.60 122.39 120.49 118.90 117.28 116.16 114.16 112.30
    3, Hi Average 125.20 119.61 116.66 114.10 112.03 110.22 108.70 107.34 106.27 104.36 102.73
    3 & 4 115.59 110.48 107.78 105.28 103.38 101.82 100.48 99.03 98.16 96.38 94.87
    4, Lo Average 106.78 102.03 99.47 97.20 95.50 93.96 92.67 91.43 90.65 89.05 87.56
    4 & 5 98.61 94.21 91.87 89.79 88.12 86.73 85.66 84.43 83.70 82.15 80.82
    5 Minimum 91.00 87.05 84.85 82.92 81.49 80.13 79.02 78.05 77.30 75.80 74.66

    Average Unit Area in Square Feet

    Quality Class 1,100 1,200 1,300 1,400 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,200

    Exceptional 180.02 178.09 176.50 175.18 174.06 173.03 172.15 171.37 170.63 170.07 169.53
    1, Best 158.01 156.54 154.98 153.88 152.84 151.96 151.17 150.63 149.90 149.36 148.95
    1, & 2 138.60 137.19 135.94 134.90 134.12 133.28 132.56 132.04 131.45 131.09 130.65
    2, Good 121.26 120.07 119.00 118.09 117.37 116.62 116.05 115.51 115.04 114.60 114.32
    2 & 3 111.02 109.72 108.93 108.01 107.35 106.68 106.14 105.77 105.23 104.91 104.57
    3, Hi Average 101.52 100.48 99.59 98.76 98.17 97.58 97.07 96.78 96.22 95.94 95.65
    3 & 4 93.76 92.70 91.91 91.19 90.68 90.08 89.73 89.22 88.86 88.64 88.33
    4, Lo Average 86.58 85.66 84.86 84.22 83.72 83.21 82.77 82.40 82.05 81.81 81.55
    4 & 5 79.93 79.12 78.46 77.74 77.32 76.83 76.43 76.15 75.76 75.55 75.31
    5 Minimum 73.73 73.06 72.38 71.85 71.35 70.90 70.59 70.22 70.01 69.69 69.54

    Note: Work outside metropolitan areas may cost 2 to 6% less. Add 2% to the costs for second floor areas and 4% for third
    floor areas. Add 9% when the exterior walls are masonry.

    Multi-Family, Class 2 Multi-Family, Class 4

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Multi-Family Residences – Apartments

    Residential Structures Section 21 Residential Structures Section 2

    4 to 9 Units

    Estimating Procedure
    1. Establish the structure quality class by applying the information on page 19.
    2. Multiply the average unit area by the appropriate square foot cost below. The average unit area is found by dividing the
    building area on all floors by the number of units in the building. The building area should include office and
    utility rooms, interior hallways and interior stairways.
    3. Multiply the total from step 2 by the correct location factor listed on page 7 or 8.
    4. Add, when appropriate, the cost of balconies, porches, garages, heating and cooling equipment, basements,
    fireplaces, carports, appliances and plumbing fixtures beyond that listed in the quality classification. See the cost
    of these items on pages 27 to 31.
    5. Costs assume one bathroom per unit. Add the cost of additional bathrooms from page 30.

    6995

    Average Unit Area in Square Feet
    Quality Class 400 450 500 550 600 650 700 750 800 900 1,000

    Exceptional 208.96 199.72 194.63 190.52 186.89 183.96 181.75 179.22 177.56 174.14 171.37
    1, Best 183.65 175.48 170.98 167.36 164.28 161.62 159.63 157.44 156.00 153.08 150.63
    1, & 2 160.95 153.87 149.89 146.80 143.97 141.71 140.03 138.02 136.81 134.24 132.04
    2, Good 140.87 134.68 131.23 128.41 126.04 124.03 122.50 120.71 119.61 117.41 115.51
    2 & 3 128.89 123.16 120.07 117.47 115.28 113.42 112.07 110.46 109.51 107.37 105.77
    3, Hi Average 117.92 112.74 109.77 107.42 105.33 103.74 102.54 100.97 100.20 98.18 96.78
    3 & 4 108.93 104.04 101.32 99.16 97.38 95.86 94.61 93.21 92.53 90.75 89.22
    4, Lo Average 100.52 96.02 93.70 91.61 89.90 88.45 87.31 86.17 85.42 83.77 82.40
    4 & 5 92.80 88.71 86.52 84.59 82.98 81.67 80.74 79.57 78.85 77.36 76.15
    5 Minimum 85.71 81.89 79.78 78.13 76.65 75.43 74.58 73.49 72.74 71.39 70.22

    Average Unit Area in Square Feet
    Quality Class 1,100 1,200 1,300 1,400 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,200

    Exceptional 169.67 167.83 166.33 164.98 163.96 162.84 162.04 161.39 160.58 160.02 159.63
    1, Best 148.98 147.48 146.10 144.92 144.07 143.08 142.38 141.75 141.04 140.60 140.25
    1, & 2 130.67 129.26 128.16 127.09 126.24 125.43 124.86 124.29 123.70 123.32 122.95
    2, Good 114.36 113.16 112.15 111.18 110.48 109.81 109.29 108.76 108.26 107.88 107.59
    2 & 3 104.64 103.49 102.54 101.68 101.15 100.52 99.96 99.53 98.98 98.65 98.42
    3, Hi Average 95.73 94.61 93.78 93.13 92.53 91.87 91.42 91.00 90.57 90.34 90.01
    3 & 4 88.40 87.31 86.60 85.87 85.37 84.85 84.43 84.07 83.70 83.30 83.16
    4, Lo Average 81.57 80.74 79.98 79.37 78.85 78.34 78.05 77.65 77.30 76.96 76.76
    4 & 5 75.33 74.58 73.88 73.23 72.74 72.35 71.96 71.68 71.30 71.05 70.85
    5 Minimum 69.58 68.87 68.22 67.61 67.22 66.83 66.48 66.23 65.89 65.56 65.47

    Note: Work outside metropolitan areas may cost 2 to 6% less. Add 2% to the costs for second floor areas and 4% for third
    floor areas. Add 9% when the exterior walls are masonry.

    Multi-Family, Class 3 Multi-Family, Class 3 & 4

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Multi-Family Residences – Apartments

    22 Residential Structures Section 22

    10 or More Units

    Estimating Procedure
    1. Establish the structure quality class by applying the information on page 19.
    2. Multiply the average unit area by the appropriate square foot cost below. The average unit area is found by dividing the
    building area on all floors by the number of units in the building. The building area should include office and
    utility rooms, interior hallways and interior stairways.
    3. Multiply the total from step 2 by the correct location factor listed on page 7 or 8.
    4. Add, when appropriate, the cost of balconies, porches, garages, heating and cooling equipment, basements,
    fireplaces, carports, appliances and plumbing fixtures beyond that listed in the quality classification. See the cost
    of these items on pages 27 to 31.
    5. Costs assume one bathroom per unit. Add the cost of additional bathrooms from page 30.

    Average Unit in Square Feet

    Quality Class 400 450 500 550 600 650 700 750 800 900 1,000

    Exceptional 197.56 187.83 183.96 180.12 176.50 173.75 171.37 169.25 167.54 164.60 162.20
    1, Best 173.46 165.03 161.62 158.18 154.98 152.67 150.63 148.69 147.12 144.67 142.47
    1, & 2 152.09 144.72 141.71 138.74 135.94 133.92 132.04 130.32 129.08 126.73 124.97
    2, Good 133.10 126.61 124.03 121.35 119.00 117.20 115.51 114.11 112.97 110.97 109.30
    2 & 3 121.76 115.85 113.42 111.12 108.93 107.22 105.77 104.39 103.37 101.52 99.99
    3, Hi Average 111.38 105.90 103.74 101.60 99.59 98.01 96.78 95.50 94.50 92.80 91.48
    3 & 4 102.88 97.93 95.86 93.78 91.91 90.46 89.22 88.12 87.26 85.75 84.50
    4, Lo Average 94.95 90.38 88.45 86.60 84.86 83.67 82.40 81.49 80.69 79.13 78.08
    4 & 5 87.75 83.50 81.67 79.98 78.46 77.19 76.15 75.13 74.40 73.07 72.02
    5 Minimum 80.98 77.06 75.43 73.88 72.38 71.28 70.22 69.43 68.67 67.48 66.50

    Average Unit in Square Feet

    Quality Class 1,100 1,200 1,300 1,400 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,200

    Exceptional 160.17 158.57 157.03 155.85 154.62 153.79 153.16 152.41 151.75 151.07 150.75
    1, Best 140.69 139.28 138.01 136.81 135.80 135.06 134.56 133.87 133.39 132.70 132.38
    1, & 2 123.36 122.11 120.99 120.07 119.10 118.52 117.99 117.43 116.89 116.44 116.03
    2, Good 107.98 106.91 105.90 105.00 104.13 103.69 103.19 102.74 102.21 101.82 101.60
    2 & 3 98.86 97.82 96.89 96.11 95.20 94.82 94.47 93.96 93.58 93.16 92.93
    3, Hi Average 90.38 89.50 88.64 87.88 87.17 86.73 86.43 85.97 85.62 85.26 84.92
    3 & 4 83.50 82.59 81.88 81.16 80.44 80.13 79.69 79.43 79.02 78.68 78.53
    4, Lo Average 77.06 76.29 75.55 74.93 74.38 73.99 73.61 73.25 73.05 72.66 72.52
    4 & 5 71.17 70.54 69.81 69.24 68.65 68.25 67.99 67.72 67.39 67.14 66.92
    5 Minimum 65.70 65.02 64.46 63.95 63.38 63.02 62.83 62.50 62.26 61.96 61.83

    Note: Work outside metropolitan areas may cost 2 to 6% less. Add 2% to the costs for second floor areas and 4% for third
    floor areas. Add 9% when the exterior walls are masonry.

    Multi-Family, Class 3 & 4 Multi-Family, Class 4

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Motels

    Residential Structures Section 23

    Quality Classification

    Class 1 Class 2 Class 3 Class 4
    Best Quality Good Quality Average Quality Low Quality

    Foundation (4%) Concrete slab Concrete slab Concrete slab Concrete slab
    Foundation costs will vary greatly with substrate, type, and location.

    Framing* Wood frame. Wood frame. Wood frame. Wood frame.
    (20% of total Cost)

    Windows Large, good quality. Average number and Average number and Small, few, low
    (2% of total Cost) quality. quality. cost.

    Roofing Heavy, shake, Medium shake or good Wood or good Inexpensive
    (8% of total Cost) tile or slate. built-up with large composition shingles
    rock, inexpensive tile. shingle, light shake, or built-up with
    or good built-up rock.
    with rock.

    Overhang 36″ open or 30″ open 16″ open. 12″ to 16″ open.
    (2% of total Cost) 24″ closed. or small closed.

    Exterior Walls Good wood or Good wood siding or Hardboard, wood Low cost stucco,
    (10% of total Cost) stucco, masonry stucco with some shingle, plywood hardboard or
    veneer on front. veneer. or stucco. plywood.

    Flooring Good carpet, good Good carpet, sheet vinyl Average carpet, average Minimum tile or
    (5% of total Cost) sheet vinyl. or inlaid resilient. resilient tile in bath. low cost carpet.

    Interior Finish Gypsum board with Gypsum board, taped, Gypsum board taped Minimum gyp-
    (23% of total cost including heavy texture or textured and painted and textured or sum board.
    finish carpentry, wiring, plaster with putty coat. or plaster. Some wall- colored interior
    lighting, etc.) Some good sheet wall paper. stucco.
    cover or paneling.

    Baths Vinyl or foil wall cover, Ceramic tile over tub Plastic coated hard- Plastic coated
    (15% of total Cost) ceramic tile over tub with glass shower board with low cost hardboard with
    with glass shower door, door. glass shower door. one small mirror.
    ample mirrors.

    Plumbing** Copper tube, good Galvanized pipe, Average cost fixtures. Plastic pipe,
    (9% of total Cost) quality fixtures. good fixtures. low cost fixtures.

    Special 8′ sliding glass door, 8′ sliding glass door, Small tile or plastic None.
    Features 8′ to 10′ tile pullman good tile or plastic pullman in bath.
    (2% of total Cost) in bath. top pullman in bath.

    *For Masonry Walls 8″ textured face 8″ colored or detailed 8″ colored block 8″ painted
    reinforced masonry. reinforced masonry. or common brick, concrete block.
    reinforced.
    Note: When masonry walls are used in lieu of wood frame walls add 8% to the appropriate cost

    **Add the Following Amounts per Kitchen Unit
    Kitchens Good sink, 8′ to 10′ Average sink and 6′ Low cost sink, and 5′ Minimum sink,
    of good cabinets and to 8′ average cabinet of cabinets and cabinets and
    drainboard – $3,700 and drainboard – $3,430 drainboard – $2,460 drainboard – $2,090
    Add the cost of built-in kitchen fixtures from the table of costs for built-in appliances on page 29.

    Note: Use the percent of total cost to help identify the correct quality classification.
    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Motels

    Residential Structures Section 24

    9 Units or Less

    Estimating Procedure
    1. Establish the structure quality class by applying the information on page 23.
    2. Multiply the average unit area by the appropriate cost below. The average unit area is found by dividing the total building

    area on all floors (including office and manager’s area, utility rooms, interior hallways and stairway area) by the number of
    units in the building.

    3. Multiply the total from step 2 by the correct location factor listed on page 7 or 8.
    4. Add, when appropriate, the cost of heating and cooling equipment, porches, balconies, exterior stairs, garages, kitchens,

    built-in kitchen appliances and fireplaces. See pages 23 and 27 to 31.

    VACANCY

    M
    O
    T
    E
    L

    Average Unit Area in Square Feet

    Quality Class 200 225 250 275 300 330 375 425 500 600 720

    1, Best 165.64 159.71 155.05 151.11 147.87 144.67 140.79 137.38 133.58 129.93 126.94
    1 & 2 152.16 146.69 142.41 138.82 135.88 132.87 129.25 126.17 122.67 119.38 116.57
    2, Good 141.20 136.17 132.17 128.86 126.08 123.35 120.01 117.16 113.85 110.76 108.20
    2 & 3 129.74 125.15 121.42 118.39 115.86 113.32 110.23 107.63 104.63 101.82 99.47
    3, Average 120.40 116.10 112.72 109.86 107.49 105.12 102.32 99.82 97.07 94.44 92.28
    3 & 4 110.50 106.57 103.44 100.83 98.69 96.50 93.88 91.68 89.07 86.71 84.66
    4, Low 101.02 97.36 94.50 92.17 90.16 88.22 85.82 83.78 81.40 79.20 77.37

    Note: Add 2% for work above the first floor. Work outside metropolitan areas may cost 2 to 6% less. Add 8% when the
    exterior walls are masonry. Deduct 2% for area built on a concrete slab.

    Motel, Class 3 & 4

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Motels

    Residential Structures Section 25

    10 to 24 Units

    Estimating Procedure
    1. Establish the structure quality class by applying the information on page 23.
    2. Multiply the average unit area by the appropriate cost below. The average unit area is found by dividing the total building
    area on all floors (including office and manager’s area, utility rooms, interior hallways and stairway area) by the number of
    units in the building.
    3. Multiply the total from step 2 by the correct location factor listed on page 7 or 8.
    4. Add, when appropriate, the cost of heating and cooling equipment, porches, balconies, exterior stairs, garages, kitchens,
    built-in kitchen appliances and fireplaces. See pages 23 and 27 to 31.

    Average Unit Area in Square Feet
    Quality Class 200 225 250 275 300 330 375 425 500 600 720

    1, Best 160.49 154.79 150.18 146.47 143.33 140.17 136.39 133.14 129.44 125.89 123.00
    1 & 2 147.42 142.19 137.97 134.53 131.62 128.75 125.28 122.28 118.90 115.69 112.95
    2, Good 136.93 132.08 128.10 124.91 122.25 119.56 116.33 113.52 110.36 107.40 104.94
    2 & 3 125.75 121.26 117.60 114.70 112.25 109.72 106.84 104.25 101.34 98.60 96.32
    3, Average 116.64 112.48 109.19 106.40 104.12 101.87 99.09 96.73 94.04 91.54 89.35
    3 & 4 107.06 103.24 100.21 97.69 95.61 93.49 90.94 88.82 86.27 84.00 82.05
    4, Low 97.87 94.33 91.59 89.30 87.38 85.50 83.13 81.16 78.92 76.79 75.01

    Note: Add 2% for work above the first floor. Work outside metropolitan areas may cost 2 to 6% less. Add 8% when the
    exterior walls are masonry. Deduct 2% for area built on a concrete slab.

    Motel, Class 3

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Motels

    Residential Structures Section 26

    Over 24 Units

    Estimating Procedure
    1. Establish the structure quality class by applying the information on page 23.
    2. Multiply the average unit area by the appropriate cost below. The average unit area is found by dividing the total building
    area on all floors (including office and manager’s area, utility rooms, interior hallways and stairway area) by the number of
    units in the building.
    3. Multiply the total from step 2 by the correct location factor listed on page 7 or 8.
    4. Add, when appropriate, the cost of heating and cooling equipment, porches, balconies, exterior stairs, garages, kitchens,
    built-in kitchen appliances and fireplaces. See pages 23 and 27 to 31.

    Average Unit Area in Square Feet
    Quality Class 200 225 250 275 300 330 375 425 500 600 720

    1, Best 155.21 149.66 145.22 141.63 138.53 135.52 131.87 128.74 125.18 121.78 119.00
    1 & 2 142.64 137.54 133.42 130.13 127.30 124.50 121.13 118.27 114.98 111.88 109.30
    2, Good 132.39 127.73 123.91 120.83 118.25 115.63 112.57 109.80 106.81 103.89 101.52
    2 & 3 121.62 117.24 113.80 110.97 108.52 106.17 103.32 100.79 98.04 95.42 93.22
    3, Average 112.80 108.76 105.56 102.92 100.68 98.54 95.87 93.59 90.97 88.50 86.49
    3 & 4 103.53 99.80 96.83 94.37 92.39 90.42 87.91 85.83 83.47 81.22 79.34
    4, Low 94.65 91.24 88.52 86.29 84.45 82.64 80.37 78.46 76.30 74.28 72.51

    Note: Add 2% for work above the first floor. Work outside metropolitan areas may cost 2 to 6% less. Add 8% when the
    exterior walls are masonry. Deduct 2% for area built on a concrete slab.

    Motel, Class 2 & 3

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Additional Costs for Residential Structures

    Residential Structures Section 27

    Covered Porches
    Estimate covered porches by applying a fraction of the main building square foot cost.

    Suggested
    Porch Description Fraction
    Ground level floor (usually concrete) without banister, with no ceiling and shed-type roof. 1/4 to 1/3
    High (house floor level) floor (concrete or wood) with light banister, no ceiling and shed-type roof. 1/3 to 1/2
    Same as above with a finished ceiling and roof like the residence (most typical). 1/2
    Same as above but partially enclosed with screen or glass. 1/2 to 2/3
    Enclosed lean-to (sleeping porch, etc.) with lighter foundation, wall structure,
    interior finish or roof than that of house to which it is attached. 1/2 to 3/4
    Roofed, enclosed, recessed porch, under the same roof as the main building and with
    the same type and quality foundation (includes shape costs). 3/4
    Roofed, enclosed, recessed porch with the same type roof and foundation as the
    main building (includes shape costs). 4/4
    Good arbor or pergola with floor. 1/4 to 1/3

    Uncovered Concrete Decks, cost per square foot, 4″ thick concrete
    On Grade 1′ High 2′ High 3′ High 4′ High
    Less than 100 square feet $7.99 $11.17 $17.96 $25.21 $36.75
    100 to 200 square feet 7.27 10.08 14.56 20.48 27.30
    200 to 400 square feet 6.18 7.99 12.47 18.16 23.52
    Over 400 square feet 5.99 7.27 10.97 14.56 18.96

    Uncovered Wood Decks, cost per square foot, 2″ thick deck with typical steps and railing

    1′ to 4′ above ground. $23.07 to $26.89
    Over 4′ to 6′ above ground 26.80 to 34.54
    Over 6′ to 9′ above ground 27.96 to 36.55
    Over 9′ to 12′ above ground 28.98 to 38.24
    Over 12′ above ground 30.50 to 39.82

    Porch Roofs, cost per square foot based on wood shingle cover
    Type Cost per Square Foot Alternate Roof Covers Cost Difference per S.F.

    Unceiled shed roof $9.13 to $10.87 Corrugated aluminum Deduct $.78 to $.98
    Ceiled shed roof 15.43 to 17.41 Roll asphalt Deduct .79 to .88
    Unceiled gable roof 10.29 to 13.35 Fiberglass shingles Deduct .98 to 1.09
    Ceiled gable roof 17.40 to 19.29 Wood shakes Add 1.13 to 1.75
    (See the figures at the right for other roof cover) Clay or concrete tile Add 6.40 to 7.80
    Slate Add 6.92 to 9.54

    Residential Basements, cost per square foot, including stairs
    Size Unfinished Basements Finished Basements

    Less than 400 square feet $25 to $42 $38 to $57
    400 – 1,000 square feet 19 to 28 32 to 38
    Over 1,000 square feet 16 to 19 29 to 34

    These basement costs assume normal soil conditions, 7′ headroom, no plumbing, partitions or windows. Unfinished
    basements have reinforced concrete floors and concrete or concrete block walls, a floor drain, stairway with a landing and
    handrail, open ceilings and one switched fluorescent fixture. Finished residential basements have a tile ceiling, resilient
    flooring, wood panel walls and lighting similar to Class 5 residences. Residential basements are common in climates where
    footing depths must be 4′ or more to prevent frost heaving. These figures assume the residence is in an area where minimum
    footing depth is 4 feet. Where climate doesn’t influence footing depth, unfinished basement costs will be 20% to 50% higher.

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Additional Costs for Residential Structures

    Residential Structures Section 28

    Balconies, Standard Wood Frame, cost per square foot, including foundations

    Supported by 4″ x 4″ posts, 2″ wood floor, open on underside, open 2″ x 4″ railing. $20.50 to $22.30
    Supported by 4″ x 4″ posts, 2″ wood floor, sealed on underside, solid stucco or wood siding on railing. 24.14 to 26.01
    Supported by steel columns, lightweight concrete floor, sealed on underside, solid stucco or
    open grillwork railing 36.60 to 40.60

    Heating and Cooling Equipment

    Prices include wiring and minimum duct work.
    Use the higher figures for smaller residences and in more extreme climates where greater heating and cooling density is
    required. Cost per square foot of heated or cooled area.

    Type Perimeter Outlets Overhead Outlets

    Central Ducted Air Systems, Single Family
    Forced air heating $5.36 to $5.93 $4.19 to $4.79
    Forced air heating and cooling 6.03 to 7.18 5.76 to 6.08
    Gravity heat 3.86 to 5.20 —
    Central Ducted Air Systems, Multi-Family
    Forced air heating 4.61 to 5.08 4.41 to 5.07
    Forced air heating and cooling 6.38 to 7.03 5.62 to 6.01
    Motel Units
    Forced air heating 5.52 to 5.84 5.31 to 5.76
    Forced air heating and cooling 6.51 to 7.03 6.32 to 6.51
    Circulating hot and cold water system 12.80 to 15.06 12.80 to 15.06

    Floor and Wall Furnaces, cost each
    Single floor unit $1,240 to $1,415
    Dual floor unit 2,205 to 2,370
    Single wall unit 795 to 1,020
    Dual wall unit 1,475 to 1,705
    Thermostat control, add 115 to 138

    Electric Baseboard Units, cost each
    500 watts, 3′ $296 to $332
    1,000 watts, 4′ 411 to 456
    1,500 watts, 6′ 442 to 489
    2,000 watts, 8′ 536 to 614
    2,500 watts, 10′ 624 to 681
    3,000 watts, 12′ 750 to 815

    Outside Stairways, cost per square foot of horizontal step area

    Standard wood frame, wood steps with open risers, open on underside, open 2″ x 4″ railing, unpainted. $18.28 to $20.11
    Standard wood frame, solid wood risers, sealed on underside, solid stucco or wood siding on railing. 22.01 to 26.00
    Precast concrete steps with open risers, steel frame, pipe rail with ornamental grillwork. 47.98 to 53.50

    Window Type or Thru-the-Wall
    Refrigerated Room Coolers, cost each

    1/3 ton $453 to $532
    1/2 535 to 665
    3/4 540 to 849
    1 670 to 825
    1-1/2 866 to 920
    2 927 to 1130
    Ton = 12,000 Btu

    Electric Wall Heaters, cost each

    1,000 watts $410 to $480
    2,000 477 to 515
    3,000 500 to 647
    3,500 580 to 714
    4,000 682 to 750
    4,500 750 to 955
    Add for circulating fan 79 to 115
    Add for thermostat 52 to 115

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Additional Costs for Residential Structures

    Residential Structures Section 29

    Appliances. Add these costs only when the appliance is not included in the quality class. Includes
    installation.

    Built-in single wall oven with broiler $561 to $677 Range hood and fan $168 to $397
    Built-in double wall oven with microwave 1,015 to 1,910 Franklin or Buck stove
    Drop-in range with single oven, economy 449 to 677 Steel, cast iron front 1,345 to 2,030
    Drop-in range with single oven, excellent 1,122 to 2,100 Steel, cast iron front, glass door 2,030 to 2,810
    Range top, four elements All cast iron, glass panel door 3,490 to 5,060
    Residential grade, without grill 505 to 950 Under counter 5 CF refrigerator 622 to 902
    Residential grade, with grill 835 to 1,410 Central vacuum, 3 to 5 outlets 1,915 to 3,830
    Commercial grade 3,830 to 6,410 Dishwasher 306 to 1,130
    Hot water circulator 622 to 673 Garbage disposal 204 to 476
    Instant hot water dispenser 510 to 720 Trash compactor 385 to 645

    Fireplaces, cost each, including reinforced foundation, flue, cap, gas line and valve.

    Freestanding wood burning heat circulating prefab metal fireplace 1 Story 2 Story
    with interior flue, base and cap $2,005 $2,450
    36″ wide zero-clearance enclosed metal firebox, brick face, wood mantel 2,340 2,660
    48″ wide zero-clearance enclosed metal firebox, raised hearth, brick face and mantel 3,230 3,668
    Masonry, 5′ base, common brick or block on interior face, wood or brick mantle 5,125 5,780
    Masonry, 6′ base, used brick or natural stone on interior face, raised hearth 10,240 12,110
    Masonry, 8′ base, used brick or natural stone on interior face, raised hearth 12,240 17,770

    Residential Garages and Carports

    Attached and detached garages for single family dwellings usually fall in the same quality class as the main structure. Costs
    are per SF of floor based on wood or light steel construction. Add 8% if exterior walls are masonry. Attached garages assume
    a 20 foot wall in common with the main structure. Multiply the square foot cost below by the correct location factor on page 7
    or 8 to find the square foot cost for any garage. Costs include interior finish and one light fixture per 300 SF of floor. Deduct
    10% to 18% if interior walls are unfinished. Where dwelling and exterior garage walls are in vertical alignment with second
    floor walls, the garage cost per SF will be about 2/3 of the main dwelling cost per SF if finished and 1/2 of the main dwelling
    cost if unfinished. Carports with wood or steel posts, an asphalt floor, and built-up or metal roof will cost $15.80 to $18.30 per SF.

    Square Foot Area for Attached Garages for Single Family Dwellings

    Quality Class 220 260 280 320 360 400 440 480 540 600 720

    1, Luxury 157.23 149.81 146.65 142.04 136.69 133.31 129.33 126.13 123.01 119.94 116.96
    1, & 2 136.39 130.08 127.47 123.27 119.04 116.06 112.62 109.83 107.08 104.44 101.83
    2, Semi-Luxury 102.53 97.91 96.05 92.92 89.73 87.51 84.90 82.80 80.75 78.72 76.76
    2 & 3 82.94 77.69 76.49 75.48 72.88 71.08 68.95 67.27 65.58 63.95 62.37
    3, Best Std. 68.94 65.93 64.73 62.67 60.72 59.21 57.46 56.00 54.63 53.26 51.94
    3 & 4 58.38 56.01 55.06 53.39 51.46 50.17 48.68 47.47 46.29 45.14 44.03
    4, Good Std. 51.68 49.31 48.43 47.11 45.55 44.41 43.08 42.01 40.97 39.96 38.97
    4 & 5 48.77 46.14 45.09 43.61 42.05 41.01 39.77 38.79 37.82 36.90 35.97
    5 Avg. Std. 45.67 42.87 41.86 40.27 38.54 37.58 36.46 35.55 34.68 33.80 32.97
    5 & 6 40.53 38.27 37.41 35.96 34.63 33.75 32.74 31.94 31.15 30.38 29.61
    6, Min. Std. 35.51 33.66 33.13 32.04 30.82 30.04 29.16 28.42 27.70 27.04 26.35

    Square Foot Area for Detached Garages for Single Family Dwellings

    Quality Class 220 260 280 320 360 400 440 480 540 600 720

    1, Luxury 178.84 165.28 160.36 151.80 148.80 144.08 137.81 134.39 131.05 127.80 124.62
    1, & 2 154.08 142.87 138.30 131.22 128.85 124.75 119.33 116.37 113.47 110.64 107.90
    2, Semi-Luxury 114.85 106.79 103.63 98.35 96.65 93.59 89.49 87.29 85.12 83.00 80.93
    2 & 3 92.85 86.24 83.62 79.42 78.13 75.63 72.35 70.56 68.79 67.09 65.43
    3, Best Std. 76.87 71.38 69.29 65.89 64.82 62.77 60.02 58.54 57.07 55.67 54.29
    3 & 4 68.09 63.38 61.47 58.52 57.65 55.79 53.38 52.06 50.76 49.49 48.27
    4, Good Std. 60.05 55.93 54.25 51.58 50.82 49.19 47.06 45.88 44.75 43.64 42.55
    4 & 5 55.48 51.64 50.14 47.23 47.04 45.55 43.55 42.47 41.42 40.38 39.38
    5 Avg. Std. 52.43 48.00 46.29 43.64 42.69 41.35 39.54 38.55 37.59 36.65 35.75
    5 & 6 44.11 40.74 39.34 37.31 36.68 35.52 33.96 33.12 32.30 31.50 30.70
    6, Min. Std. 38.43 35.50 34.49 32.72 32.28 31.25 29.89 29.16 28.41 27.69 27.04

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Additional Costs for Residential Structures

    30 Residential Structures Section

    Costs for Multi-Family Residential Bathrooms beyond 1 per unit

    Class 1 Class 2 Class 3 Class 4 Class 5
    Best Quality Good Quality High Average Low Average Minimum Quality
    2 or 3 units
    2 fixture bath $8,277 $6,661 $5,634 $4,694 $3,973
    3 fixture bath 12,015 10,243 8,497 7,314 5,855
    4 fixture bath 15,287 13,214 11,797 9,665 8,275
    4 to 9 units
    2 fixture bath 7,639 6,333 5,293 4,423 3,647
    3 fixture bath 10,810 9,389 8,082 6,718 5,406
    4 fixture bath 14,959 12,666 10,471 8,725 7,208
    10 or more units
    2 fixture bath 6,879 5,855 4,970 3,865 3,188
    3 fixture bath 10,593 8,846 7,427 5,853 4,806
    4 fixture bath 13,977 12,015 9,609 7,863 6,006

    Half Story Areas

    Lesser
    Same Finish Quality
    Type As Main Area Finish
    Use a fraction of the basic square foot cost for A 1/3 1/4
    figuring the reduced headroom floor area. B 1/2 1/3
    Type “C” includes typical dormers. C 2/3 1/2

    Elevators, per shaft cost for car and machinery

    Hydraulic based on two stops
    Capacity 100 F.P.M. 200 F.P.M.

    2,000 lbs. $44,370 $73,460
    2,500 lbs. 47,678 76,625
    3,000 lbs. 49,520 82,110
    3,500 lbs. — 86,700
    4,000 lbs. — 89,800
    Add for deluxe car, $9,125. Add for each additional
    stop over 2: $3,500, baked enamel doors $9,410,
    stainless steel doors $9,910.

    Electric based on six stops
    Capacity 200 F.P.M. 250 F.P.M. 300 F.P.M.

    2,000 lbs. $111,412 $117,900 $122,460
    2,500 lbs. 117,980 124,550 132,135
    3,000 lbs. 126,670 138,435 142,940
    3,500 lbs. 138,535 147,225 154,862
    4,000 lbs. 147,345 159,245 166,805
    Add $8,630 for a deluxe car. Add $9,370 for each
    additional stop over 6.

    Type A Type B Type C

    7′-6″

    20′

    7′-6″
    8′-0″

    20′
    20′

    12
    20′

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Multi-Family and Motel Garages Cost Per Square Foot

    Residential Structures Section 31

    Garages built at ground level under a multi-family or
    motel unit. The costs below include the following
    components:
    1. A reinforced concrete floor in all areas.
    2. Exterior walls, on one long side and two short sides,

    made up of a wood frame and good quality stucco,
    wood siding or masonry veneer.

    3. A finished ceiling in all areas.
    4. The difference between the cost of a standard wood

    frame floor structure at second floor level and one at
    ground level.

    5. An inexpensive light fixture for each 600 square feet.

    Where no exterior walls enclose the two short sides, use
    2/3 of the square foot cost.

    Garages built as separate structures for multi-family or
    motel units. The costs below include the following
    components:
    1. Foundations.
    2. A reinforced concrete floor in all areas.
    3. Exterior walls on one long side and two short sides,

    made up of a wood frame and good quality stucco,
    wood siding or masonry veneer.

    4. Steel support columns supporting the roof.

    5. A wood frame roof structure with composition tar and
    gravel, wood shingle or light shake cover. No interior
    ceiling finish.

    6. An inexpensive light fixture for each 600 square feet.

    Use the location modifiers on page 7 or 8 to adjust garage
    costs to any area.

    Basement Garages

    Costs listed below are per square foot of floor, including the
    horizontal area of stairs and the approach ramp. These
    costs assume a single-level garage is built on one level,
    approximately 5 feet below grade, directly below 2 to 4 story
    multi-family structure with perimeter walls in vertical
    alignment. These costs include:

    1. Excavation to 5′ below ground line.

    2. Full wall enclosure.

    3. Typical storage facilities.

    4. Minimum lighting.

    5. Concrete floors.

    Use the location modifiers on page 7 or 8 to adjust garage
    costs to the site.

    Ground Level Garages

    Area 400 800 1,200 2,000 3,000 5,000 10,000 20,000
    Cost 35.75 31.99 28.58 25.10 23.50 22.54 21.91 20.88

    Separate Structure Garages

    Area 400 800 1,200 2,000 3,000 5,000 10,000 20,000
    Cost 41.00 36.50 33.50 31.79 30.43 29.20 27.96 27.35

    Basement Garages

    Type 5,000 7,500 10,000 15,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 60,000

    Reinforced concrete exterior walls and columns.
    Flat concrete roof slab. 54.59 49.93 47.78 47.10 45.71 45.17 44.53 44.04

    Concrete block exterior walls, reinforced
    concrete columns. Flat concrete roof slab. 54.26 50.85 47.53 46.23 45.25 44.64 44.00 42.54

    Concrete block exterior walls, steel posts
    and beams, light concrete/metal roof
    fireproofed with spray plaster. 50.90 46.55 44.32 38.40 36.72 41.19 39.90 39.28

    Concrete block exterior walls, wood posts
    and beams, light concrete/metal roof
    fireproofed with spray plaster. 45.42 43.15 40.47 37.69 36.50 36.00 35.43 34.78

    Add for each security gate 3.41 2.48 2.09 1.55 1.31 1.06 .92 .81

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Cabins and Recreational Dwellings

    32 Residential Structures Section

    Cabins and recreational dwellings are designed for single
    family occupancy, usually on an intermittent basis. These
    structures are characterized by a more rustic interior and
    exterior finish and often have construction details which
    would not meet building requirements in metropolitan areas.
    Classify these structures into either “conventional type” or
    “A-frame” construction. Conventional dwellings have an
    exterior wall which is approximately 8 feet high on all sides.
    A-frame cabins have a sloping roof which reduces the
    horizontal area 8 feet above the first floor to between 50%
    and 75% of the first floor area.

    Conventional recreational dwellings vary widely in quality
    and the quality of construction is the most significant factor
    influencing cost. Conventional recreational dwellings are
    listed in six quality classes. Class 1 is the most expensive
    commonly encountered and Class 6 is the minimum
    commonly encountered. Nearly all conventional recreational
    dwellings built from stock plans will fall into Class 3, 4, 5, or
    6. For convenience, these classes are labeled Best
    Standard, Good Standard, Average Standard or Minimum
    Standard. Class 1 residences are labeled Luxury. Class 2
    residences are labeled Semi-Luxury. Class 1 and 2
    residences are designed by professional architects, usually
    to meet preferences of the first owner.

    The shape of the outside perimeter also has a significant
    influence on cost: The more complex the shape, the more
    expensive the structure per square foot of floor. The shape
    classification of multiple story or split-level conventional
    recreational dwellings should be based on the outline
    formed by the outermost exterior walls, including the garage
    area, regardless of the story level. Most conventional
    recreational dwellings fall into Classes 3, 4, 5 or 6 and have
    4, 6, 8 or 10 corners, as illustrated above. Small insets that
    do not require a change in the roof line can be ignored
    when evaluating the outside perimeter.

    Class 1 and 2 (Luxury and Semi-Luxury) conventional
    recreational dwellings have more than ten corners and are
    best evaluated by counting the “building masses.” A
    building mass is a group of contiguous rooms on one or
    more levels with access at varying angles from a common
    point or hallway. The illustration at the right above
    represents a conventional recreational dwelling with two
    building masses. Most Class 1 and Class 2 conventional
    recreational dwellings have from one to four building
    masses, ignoring any attached garage. For convenience,
    cost tables for Class 1 and 2 conventional recreational
    dwellings with one, two, three or four building masses have
    been appended to cost tables for Class 3, 4, 5 and 6
    conventional recreational dwellings with 4, 6, 8 and 10
    building corners.

    Conventional recreational dwellings which have features
    of two or more quality classes can be placed between two
    of the six labeled classes. The tables have five half-classes
    (1 & 2, 2 & 3, etc.) which can be applied to conventional
    recreational dwellings with some characteristics of two or
    more quality classes. If a portion of a conventional
    recreational dwelling differs significantly in quality from other
    portions, evaluate the square footage of each portion
    separately.

    Cabins and recreational dwellings are often built under
    difficult working conditions and in remote sites. Individual
    judgments may be necessary in evaluating the cost impact
    of the dwelling location. The costs assume construction by
    skilled professional craftsmen. Where non-professional
    labor or second quality materials are used, use the next
    lower quality classification that might otherwise apply. If the
    structure is assembled from prefabricated components, use
    costs for the next lower half class.

    Example of Dwelling Shapes

    4 corners 6 corners 8 corners 10 corners 2 building masses

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Conventional Recreational Dwellings

    Residential Structures Section 33

    Quality Classification
    Class 1 Class 2 Class 3 Class 4 Class 5 Class 6
    Luxury Semi-Luxury Best Std. Good Std. Average Std Minimum Std.

    Foundation Reinforced concrete Reinforced Reinforced Reinforced concrete Reinforced concrete Wood piers, light
    (8% of total cost) on a sloping site. concrete. concrete. or concrete block. or concrete block. concrete or block

    Floor Engineered Engineered Engineered wood Good wood Standard wood 2″ floor joists 16″
    Structure wood or steel, wood or steel or steel trusses, frame with OSB frame with OSB on center with
    (11% of total cost) complex plan, trusses, good T&G sub-floor, sub-floor, some sub-floor, some OSB sub-floor.
    elevation changes. floor insulation. good floor insulation. floor insulation. floor insulation.

    Wall Framing Wood or steel, Wood or steel, Wood or steel, Wood or steel, Wood or steel, Wood or steel,
    and Exterior irregular walls, irregular walls, several wall offsets, shingle or plywood wood panel siding panel hardboard
    Finish wood siding, stone, wood siding, stone plywood or lap siding, siding, some trim few or no offsets, siding, minimum
    (14% of total cost) veneer, top-grade veneer, better doors good grade doors or veneer, average commodity grade grade doors and
    doors and windows. and windows. and windows. doors and windows. doors and windows. windows.

    Roof Complex, heavy Multi-pitch, shake, Dual-pitch, wood Wood trusses, wood Simple wood frame, Wood frame,
    (13% of total cost) tile or metal cover, metal or good tile single or tile surface, or good fiberglass fiberglass shingle fiberglass shingle
    highly detailed. surface. gable over entrances. shingle surface. surface. or roll roofing cover.

    Floor Finish Stone or masonry Masonry entry, good Hardwood or tile entry, Good sheet vinyl Sheet vinyl or tile Composition tile
    (5% of total cost) tile entry, inlaid hardwood or carpet carpet in most rooms or average carpet on most areas, or minimum grade
    hardwood or best in most rooms, good sheet vinyl in kitchen in most areas, some carpet in living sheet vinyl.
    carpet throughout. sheet vinyl elsewhere. and bathrooms. hardwood or tile. room.

    Interior Wall Top-grade paneling Good wood paneling Good hardwood 1/2″ gypsum 1/2″ gypsum Taped 1/2″ gypsum
    and Ceiling or wallboard with or textured wallboard veneer paneling or wallboard with wallboard with wallboard, smooth
    Finish artistic finish, with decorative gypsum wallboard, smooth finish, smooth finish, or orange peel
    (8% of total cost) many offsets and details in most some irregular walls, plywood paneling. most walls are finish. Nearly all
    wall openings, rooms, many wall decorative details at entry and living rectangular, doors walls are regular,
    decorative details openings, several in living room, entry room, some and windows are few decorative
    in most rooms. racks and shelves. and kitchen. decorative details. the only openings. details.

    Interior Exposed beams or Great room has Cathedral ceiling Cathedral ceiling Rustic exposed Minimum grade
    Features decorative details, exposed beams, at entry or in master in master bedroom, ceiling beams, molding and trim.
    (5% of total cost) 10′ to 14′ ceiling most rooms have bedroom, floor level sliding glass door, sliding closet doors,
    in great room, windows on two changes, several decorative wood standard grade
    many sky widows, sides, several framed wall openings or molding and trim. wood molding and
    built-in shelving. openings. pass-throughs. trim.

    Bath At least 1 large tile Tile in 1 bathroom, Tile or fiberglass Good plastic tub and Average plastic tub Minimum plastic
    Detail shower, good glass block or good shower, at least one shower in at least one and shower in at tub and shower in
    (4% of total cost) tile counter in window in each bath, built-in bathtub, good bathroom, one small least one bathroom, one bathroom,
    master bath. good vanity cabinet. window in each bath. window in each bath. small vanity cabinet. minimum vanity.

    Kitchen Over 20 LF of 15 to 18 LF of good 12 to 15 LF of good 10 to 12 LF of stock 8 to 10 LF of stock Less than 8
    Detail good custom wall custom base stock wall and base standard grade wall standard grade wall LF of low-cost
    (8% of total cost) & base cabinets, and wall cabinets, cabinets, tile or and base cabinets, and base cabinets, wall and base
    synthetic stone acrylic or tile counter acrylic counter top, low-cost tile or laminated plastic cabinets, resin-
    counter top, top, desk with book desk and shelf or laminated plastic or resin coated coated hardboard
    island work area. shelf above. breakfast nook. counter top. hardboard top. counter top.

    Plumbing 12 good fixtures, 10 good fixtures 9 average grade 8 standard grade, 7 low-cost fixtures, 6 or less minimum
    (11% of total cost) 2 water heaters, large water heater, fixtures, copper fixtures, plastic supply plastic supply and grade fixtures,
    laundry room, laundry area, supply and plastic and plastic drain plastic drain lines. plastic supply
    copper piping. copper piping. drain piping. lines. and drain lines.

    Special 10 deluxe built-in 7 good built-in 6 good built-in 5 average built-in 4 standard grade 3 minimum grade
    Features appliances, good appliances, good appliances, good appliances, adequate kitchen appliances, built-in kitchen
    (4% of total cost) weather-protection wall and ceiling wall and ceiling, wall and ceiling adequate ceiling appliances,
    throughout. insulation. insulation. insulation. insulation. limited insulation.

    Electrical Ample area and Good area and Good light fixtures Good light fixture Simple light fixture 5 or less lighting
    System track lighting in track lighting, in kitchen and baths, in most rooms, in most rooms, fixtures, switch-
    (9% of total cost) most rooms, task simple light fixture limited fixtures in switch-operated switch-operated operated plug outlet
    light in bathrooms. in each bathroom. other rooms. outlet in bedrooms. plugs in bedrooms. in most rooms.

    Note: Use the percent of total cost to help identify the correct quality classification.
    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Conventional Recreational Dwellings

    34 Residential Structures Section

    4 Corners (Classes 3, 4, 5, and 6) or
    One Building Mass (Classes 1 and 2 Only)

    Estimating Procedure
    1. Establish the structure quality class by applying the information on page 33.
    2. Multiply the structure floor area by the appropriate cost listed below.
    3. Multiply the total from step 2 by the correct location factor listed on page 7 or 8.
    4. Add, when appropriate, the cost of a deck or porch, paving, fireplace, garage or carport, heating, extra plumbing fixtures,

    supporting walls, half story areas, construction on hillside lots, and construction in remote areas.
    See page 42.

    Square Foot Area

    Quality Class 400 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 1,300 1,400

    1, Luxury — — — — 395.54 378.36 364.02 352.59 342.82 334.36 326.70
    1, & 2 — — — 366.51 347.63 332.59 319.95 310.07 301.24 294.05 287.27
    2, Semi-Luxury — — 343.94 321.69 305.05 291.89 280.79 272.26 264.41 258.07 252.02
    2 & 3 — 322.99 298.49 279.14 264.58 253.28 243.53 236.40 229.29 223.80 218.72
    3, Best Std. 269.80 241.98 223.67 209.17 198.34 189.75 182.50 177.08 171.89 167.72 163.90
    3 & 4 246.56 221.18 204.32 191.09 181.24 173.45 166.91 161.82 157.15 153.32 149.80
    4, Good Std. 225.32 202.08 186.84 174.59 165.70 158.48 152.40 147.89 143.55 140.20 136.92
    4 & 5 207.93 186.43 172.34 161.20 152.84 146.29 140.61 136.45 132.35 129.26 126.37
    5 Avg. Std. 191.75 171.97 159.05 148.63 141.00 134.89 129.71 125.80 122.22 119.31 116.48
    5 & 6 176.89 158.73 146.63 137.11 130.02 124.44 119.69 116.03 112.80 109.93 107.49
    6, Min. Std. 163.13 146.37 135.36 126.45 119.94 114.88 110.41 107.14 103.90 101.52 99.19

    Square Foot Area

    Quality Class 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 2,000 2,200 2,400 2,600 2,800 3,000 3,200

    1, Luxury 321.87 315.36 310.74 306.23 298.30 291.15 286.30 280.94 277.69 273.11 270.48
    1, & 2 281.57 277.32 273.13 269.21 262.30 255.81 251.73 246.92 244.22 240.21 237.71
    2, Semi-Luxury 248.12 243.48 239.72 236.32 230.28 224.40 221.01 216.75 214.29 210.84 208.62
    2 & 3 215.11 211.26 207.98 204.99 199.70 194.72 191.66 188.07 185.96 182.88 180.99
    3, Best Std. 161.31 158.23 155.83 153.64 149.70 145.95 143.75 140.85 139.34 137.08 135.56
    3 & 4 147.30 144.64 142.44 140.41 136.69 133.34 131.26 128.84 127.32 125.21 123.99
    4, Good Std. 134.63 132.23 130.10 128.34 124.98 121.77 119.98 117.74 116.45 114.45 113.27
    4 & 5 124.19 121.89 120.21 118.31 115.20 112.38 110.73 108.55 107.43 105.57 —
    5 Avg. Std. 114.59 112.52 110.77 109.21 106.31 103.77 102.19 100.17 99.07 — —
    5 & 6 105.73 103.81 102.21 100.82 98.16 95.69 94.23 92.35 — — —
    6, Min. Std. 97.57 95.74 94.29 92.92 90.49 88.27 86.83 — — — —

    Note: Add 4% to the square foot cost for floors above the second floor level.

    Conventional Recreational Dwelling, Class 5 Conventional Recreational Dwelling, Class 3

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Conventional Recreational Dwellings

    Residential Structures Section 35

    6 Corners (Classes 3, 4, 5, and 6) or
    Two Building Masses (Classes 1 and 2 Only)

    Estimating Procedure
    1. Establish the structure quality class by applying the information on page 33.
    2. Multiply the structure floor area by the appropriate cost listed below.
    3. Multiply the total from step 2 by the correct location factor listed on page 7 or 8.
    4. Add, when appropriate, the cost of a deck or porch, paving, fireplace, garage or carport, heating, extra plumbing fixtures,
    supporting walls, half story areas, construction on hillside lots, and construction in remote areas.
    See page 42.

    Square Foot Area
    Quality Class 400 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 1,300 1,400

    1, Luxury — — — — 404.23 386.82 372.16 361.40 351.36 343.07 335.61
    1, & 2 — — — 374.09 355.47 340.16 327.20 317.80 308.81 301.49 294.86
    2, Semi-Luxury — — 350.54 328.37 312.01 298.57 287.19 278.92 271.02 264.51 258.78
    2 & 3 — 329.51 304.20 284.98 270.67 259.04 249.23 241.98 235.07 229.45 224.40
    3, Best Std. 274.58 246.98 227.97 213.64 202.82 194.10 186.70 181.28 176.27 171.94 168.24
    3 & 4 250.91 225.66 208.42 195.20 185.38 177.50 170.72 165.60 160.97 157.16 153.81
    4, Good Std. 229.25 206.27 190.52 178.45 169.39 162.13 155.94 151.30 147.19 143.72 140.54
    4 & 5 211.52 190.25 175.63 164.64 156.39 149.56 143.87 139.74 135.77 132.55 129.63
    5 Avg. Std. 195.07 175.51 162.02 151.78 144.14 137.96 132.69 128.89 125.21 122.30 119.58
    5 & 6 179.98 161.93 149.47 140.05 133.05 127.26 122.44 118.96 115.55 112.81 110.38
    6, Min. Std. 166.11 149.34 137.90 129.20 122.76 117.48 113.00 109.68 106.58 104.03 101.77

    Square Foot Area
    Quality Class 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 2,000 2,200 2,400 2,600 2,800 3,000 3,200

    1, Luxury 329.99 323.76 319.38 314.82 306.86 299.19 295.01 289.30 286.17 281.77 278.87
    1, & 2 290.08 284.71 280.71 276.70 269.63 263.03 259.28 254.43 251.70 247.63 244.93
    2, Semi-Luxury 254.53 250.02 246.37 242.92 236.72 230.90 227.47 223.36 221.01 217.42 214.92
    2 & 3 220.72 217.06 213.80 210.70 205.25 200.30 197.30 193.77 191.66 188.57 186.35
    3, Best Std. 165.49 162.63 160.28 158.00 153.82 150.08 147.85 145.13 143.75 141.33 139.63
    3 & 4 151.21 148.55 146.44 144.33 140.61 137.11 135.17 132.70 131.26 129.20 127.62
    4, Good Std. 138.20 135.83 133.91 131.97 128.52 125.32 123.51 121.29 119.98 118.14 116.64
    4 & 5 127.55 125.21 123.51 121.73 118.57 115.59 113.92 111.95 110.73 108.97 —
    5 Avg. Std. 117.58 115.55 113.92 112.34 109.28 106.72 105.11 103.22 102.19 — —
    5 & 6 108.54 106.58 105.11 103.62 100.89 98.37 96.95 95.26 — — —
    6, Min. Std. 100.12 98.29 96.95 95.59 93.02 90.80 89.48 — — — —

    Note: Add 4% to the square foot cost for floors above the second floor level.

    Conventional Recreational Dwelling, Class 4 & 5 Conventional Recreational Dwelling, Class 3

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Conventional Recreational Dwellings

    36 Residential Structures Section

    8 Corners (Classes 3, 4, 5, and 6) or
    Three Building Masses (Classes 1 and 2 only)
    Estimating Procedure
    1. Establish the structure quality class by applying the information on page 33.
    2. Multiply the structure floor area by the appropriate cost listed below.
    3. Multiply the total from step 2 by the correct location factor listed on page 7 or 8.
    4. Add, when appropriate, the cost of a deck or porch, paving, fireplace, garage or carport, heating, extra plumbing fixtures,
    supporting walls, half story areas, construction on hillside lots, and construction in remote areas.
    See page 42.

    Square Foot Area
    Quality Class 400 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 1,300 1,400

    1, Luxury — — — — 414.89 395.25 380.85 370.05 359.56 351.76 343.60
    1, & 2 — — — 381.93 364.62 347.63 334.76 325.36 316.09 309.27 302.09
    2, Semi-Luxury — — 357.77 335.13 319.95 305.15 293.87 285.49 277.56 271.31 265.14
    2 & 3 — 335.62 310.35 290.77 277.58 264.77 254.97 247.56 240.85 235.39 230.01
    3, Best Std. 278.95 251.47 232.60 217.82 208.02 198.42 191.09 185.52 180.51 176.46 172.38
    3 & 4 255.06 229.96 212.54 199.20 190.18 181.33 174.71 169.61 164.93 161.20 157.56
    4, Good Std. 233.04 210.11 194.33 181.96 173.81 165.74 159.60 154.96 150.72 147.24 144.00
    4 & 5 215.03 193.79 179.25 167.83 160.31 152.90 147.20 143.02 139.16 135.91 132.96
    5 Avg. Std. 198.37 178.77 165.32 154.90 147.87 141.02 135.83 131.97 128.34 125.32 122.50
    5 & 6 182.95 164.93 152.46 142.85 136.45 130.10 125.23 121.73 118.31 115.60 113.11
    6, Min. Std. 168.74 152.14 140.66 131.79 125.80 119.98 115.59 112.34 109.21 106.72 104.38

    Square Foot Area
    Quality Class 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 2,000 2,200 2,400 2,600 2,800 3,000 3,200

    1, Luxury 338.42 331.93 327.01 323.71 314.82 308.07 302.82 298.02 294.54 289.69 286.98
    1, & 2 297.43 291.89 287.57 284.57 276.74 270.59 266.27 261.97 260.83 254.64 252.32
    2, Semi-Luxury 261.13 256.28 252.52 249.64 243.00 237.39 233.69 229.78 227.11 223.51 221.48
    2 & 3 226.43 222.25 219.03 216.56 210.80 205.83 202.79 199.37 196.99 193.90 192.16
    3, Best Std. 169.68 166.50 164.13 162.29 158.04 154.26 151.98 149.43 147.68 145.39 143.97
    3 & 4 155.16 152.23 149.90 148.33 144.53 141.02 138.86 136.62 134.93 132.95 131.65
    4, Good Std. 141.78 139.16 137.10 135.56 132.05 128.89 126.92 124.85 123.36 121.30 120.32
    4 & 5 130.70 128.34 126.42 125.23 121.76 118.96 117.12 115.14 113.80 111.99 —
    5 Avg. Std. 120.60 118.33 116.64 115.36 112.35 109.68 108.12 106.21 104.97 — —
    5 & 6 111.21 109.23 107.72 106.31 103.65 101.11 99.67 97.96 — — —
    6, Min. Std. 102.58 100.82 99.24 98.16 95.68 93.39 91.96 — — — —

    Note: Add 4% to the square foot cost for floors above the second floor level.

    Conventional Recreational Dwelling, Class 3 Conventional Recreational Dwelling, Class 1 & 2

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Conventional Recreational Dwellings

    Residential Structures Section 37

    10 Corners (Classes 3, 4, 5, and 6) or
    Four Building Masses (Classes 1 and 2 only)

    Estimating Procedure
    1. Establish the structure quality class by applying the information on page 33.
    2. Multiply the structure floor area by the appropriate cost listed below.
    3. Multiply the total from step 2 by the correct location factor listed on page 7 or 8.
    4. Add, when appropriate, the cost of a deck or porch, paving, fireplace, garage or carport, heating, extra plumbing fixtures,
    supporting walls, half story areas, construction on hillside lots, and construction in remote areas.
    See page 42.

    Square Foot Area
    Quality Class 400 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 1,300 1,400

    1, Luxury — — — — 422.04 404.23 389.96 378.73 368.94 360.59 352.59
    1, & 2 — — — 389.76 370.90 355.47 342.79 332.95 324.24 317.51 309.95
    2, Semi-Luxury — — 364.62 342.11 325.43 312.01 300.82 292.21 284.49 277.99 272.03
    2 & 3 — 341.57 316.43 296.83 282.30 270.67 260.88 253.45 246.68 241.05 236.00
    3, Best Std. 283.90 256.04 237.10 222.44 211.60 202.82 195.48 190.00 184.91 180.62 176.77
    3 & 4 259.46 234.09 216.74 203.32 193.32 185.38 178.77 173.54 169.00 165.28 161.55
    4, Good Std. 237.02 213.85 198.06 185.85 176.69 169.39 163.43 158.73 154.47 150.94 147.72
    4 & 5 218.76 197.34 182.73 171.40 163.01 156.39 150.63 146.37 142.46 139.26 136.26
    5 Avg. Std. 201.87 181.96 168.56 158.10 150.44 144.14 138.97 135.11 131.43 128.40 125.69
    5 & 6 186.18 167.83 155.46 145.84 138.75 133.05 128.30 124.53 121.27 118.55 115.91
    6, Min. Std. 171.79 154.90 143.47 134.56 127.98 122.76 118.25 115.01 111.95 109.28 107.02

    Square Foot Area
    Quality Class 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 2,000 2,200 2,400 2,600 2,800 3,000 3,200

    1, Luxury 347.70 341.35 335.95 331.41 324.00 316.06 311.88 306.08 302.88 296.39 294.77
    1, & 2 305.74 300.06 295.38 291.43 284.84 277.74 274.20 269.24 266.43 260.64 259.37
    2, Semi-Luxury 268.13 263.36 259.28 255.89 249.91 243.73 240.55 236.35 233.77 228.78 227.78
    2 & 3 232.55 228.36 224.91 222.10 216.71 211.48 208.69 205.23 202.89 198.47 197.68
    3, Best Std. 174.37 171.21 168.56 166.44 162.40 158.58 156.39 153.72 152.14 148.65 148.05
    3 & 4 159.31 156.51 153.94 152.19 148.52 144.96 142.89 140.41 138.97 135.97 135.37
    4, Good Std. 145.55 143.02 140.74 139.01 135.66 132.35 130.63 128.36 127.02 124.19 123.76
    4 & 5 134.33 131.97 129.87 128.30 125.21 122.12 120.43 118.55 117.14 114.59 —
    5 Avg. Std. 123.87 121.73 119.78 118.25 115.52 112.67 111.15 109.23 108.14 — —
    5 & 6 114.32 112.34 110.49 109.20 106.51 103.89 102.57 100.88 — — —
    6, Min. Std. 105.45 103.62 101.88 100.71 98.22 95.77 94.58 — — — —

    Note: Add 4% to the square foot cost for floors above the second floor level.

    Conventional Recreational Dwelling, Class 2 & 3 Conventional Recreational Dwelling, Class 1

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    “A-Frame” Cabins

    38 Residential Structures Section

    Quality Classification
    Class 1 Class 2 Class 3 Class 4
    Best Quality Good Quality Average Quality Low Quality

    Framing Wood frame. Wood frame. Wood frame. Wood frame.
    (10% of total cost)

    Floor Framing 4″ x 8″ girders 48″ o.c. 4″ x 8″ girders 48″ o.c. 4″ x 6″ girders 48″ o.c. 4″ x 6″ girders 48″ o.c.
    (5% of total cost) with 2″ T&G subfloor, with 1-1/4″ plywood or with 1-1/4″ plywood or with 1-1/4″ plywood or
    or 2″ x 6″ to 2″ x 8″ 2″ T&G subfloor, or 2″ T&G subfloor, or 2″ T&G subfloor, or
    joists 16″ o.c. with 1″ 2″ x 6″ to 2″ x 8″ 2″ x 6″ joists 16″ o.c. 2″ x 6″ joists 16″ o.c.
    subfloor. joists 16″ o.c. with 1″ with 1″ subfloor. with 1″ subfloor.
    subfloor.

    Roof Framing 4″ x 8″ at 48″ o.c. 4″ x 8″ at 48″ o.c. 4″ x 8″ at 48″ o.c. 4″ x 8″ at 48″ o.c.
    (8% of total cost) with 2″ or 3″ T&G with 2″ or 3″ T&G with 2″ T&G with 1-1/4″ plywood
    sheathing. sheathing. sheathing. or 2″ T&G sheathing.

    Gable End Finish Good plywood, lap Average to good Average plywood, Low cost plywood,
    (5% of total cost) board or board and plywood, or board or wood shingle or composition
    batt. boards. shingle. siding.

    Windows Good quality large Average quality Average quality wood Small glass area of
    (2% of total cost) insulated wood or insulated wood or or metal windows. low cost windows.
    metal windows. metal windows.

    Roofing Heavy wood shakes. Medium wood or Wood or composition Low cost composition
    (10% of total cost) aluminum shakes. shingles. shingles.

    Flooring Good carpet or hardwood Average to good qua- Average quality carpet Composition
    (5% of total cost) with sheet lity carpet with good with resilient tile in tile.
    vinyl in kitchen and tile or sheet vinyl in kitchen and baths.
    baths. kitchen and baths.

    Interior Finish Good quality hard- Good textured gypsum Textured gypsum Low cost paneling or
    (25% of total cost including wood veneer wallboard, good plywood wallboard or plywood wallboard.
    finish carpentry, wiring, paneling. or knotty pine paneling. paneling.
    lighting, fireplace, etc.)

    Bathrooms Two 3-fixture baths Two 3-fixture Two 3-fixture One 3-fixture
    (5% of total cost) and one 2-fixture baths, good fixtures. baths, average fixtures. bath.
    bath, good fixtures.

    Kitchen 15′ to 18′ good 12′ to 16′ of hard- 8′ to 12′ of average 6′ to 8′ of minimum
    (5% of total cost) quality hardwood wood veneer base quality veneer or base cabinets
    veneer base cabinet cabinet with match- painted base cabinets with matching wall
    with matching ing wall cabinets. with matching cabinets. 6′ to
    wall cabinets. 15′ 12′ to 16′ of plastic wall cabinets. 8′ to 8′ of minimum
    to 18′ of good quality or ceramic tile 12′ of plastic plastic drainboard.
    plastic or ceramic drainboard. drainboard.
    tile drain board.

    Plumbing Nine good quality Seven good quality Seven average quality Four low cost fixtures
    (15% of total cost) fixtures and one fixtures and one fixtures and one and one water heater.
    larger or two 30 water heater. water heater. Plastic supply pipe.
    gallon water heaters.
    Copper supply piping.

    Special Features Built-in oven, range, Built-in range, oven Drop-in range and Minimum electric
    (5% of total cost) dishwasher, disposer, and range hood, hood, some insulation, fixtures.
    range hood with good some insulation, low cost electric
    insulation, good 8′ sliding glass door, fixtures.
    lighting fixtures, average electric
    insulated sliding fixtures.
    glass door and ornate
    entry door.

    Note: Use the percent of total cost to help identify the correct quality classification.
    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    “A-Frame” Cabins

    Residential Structures Section 39

    4 Corners

    Estimating Procedure
    1. Establish the structure quality class by applying the information on page 38.
    2. Multiply the structure floor area by the appropriate cost listed below.
    3. Multiply the total from step 2 by the correct location factor listed on page 7 or 8.
    4. Add, when appropriate, the cost of a deck or porch, paving, fireplace, garage or carport, heating, extra plumbing fixtures,

    supporting walls, half story areas, construction on hillside lots, and construction in remote areas.
    See page 42.

    Square Foot Area
    Quality Class 400 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 1,300 1,400

    1, Best 220.56 199.02 184.05 173.06 164.47 157.66 152.04 147.36 143.38 139.87 136.87
    1 & 2 202.67 182.88 169.11 158.97 151.14 144.73 139.71 135.39 131.69 128.56 125.77
    2, Good 185.96 167.78 155.24 145.87 138.74 132.92 128.23 124.21 120.90 117.97 115.41
    2 & 3 175.54 158.40 146.52 137.72 130.93 125.49 120.99 117.32 114.10 111.36 108.94
    3, Average 166.31 150.06 138.79 130.44 123.99 118.85 114.59 111.08 108.12 105.47 103.21
    3 & 4 150.94 136.20 125.91 118.40 112.56 107.90 104.07 100.84 98.09 95.71 93.70
    4, Low 135.39 122.19 113.02 106.27 101.02 96.79 93.36 90.50 87.98 85.88 84.02

    Square Foot Area
    Quality Class 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 2,000 2,200 2,400 2,600 2,800 3,000 3,200

    1, Best 132.02 129.89 127.96 126.17 123.13 120.59 118.45 116.57 114.95 113.47 112.22
    1 & 2 121.82 119.87 118.01 116.43 113.64 111.27 109.32 107.58 106.11 104.76 103.61
    2, Good 112.42 110.54 108.89 107.39 104.85 102.69 100.85 99.25 97.83 96.61 95.58
    2 & 3 106.70 104.93 103.38 101.99 99.50 97.51 95.70 94.22 92.89 91.76 90.69
    3, Average 101.35 99.68 98.17 96.93 94.57 92.60 90.92 89.50 88.28 87.16 86.17
    3 & 4 93.25 91.73 90.34 89.15 87.00 85.20 83.68 82.36 81.22 80.20 79.29
    4, Low 83.42 81.78 80.95 79.81 78.79 77.17 75.77 74.55 73.53 72.62 71.80

    “A-Frame” Cabin, Class 3 & 4

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    “A-Frame” Cabins

    40 Residential Structures Section

    6 Corners

    Estimating Procedure
    1. Establish the structure quality class by applying the information on page 38.
    2. Multiply the structure floor area by the appropriate cost listed below.
    3. Multiply the total from step 2 by the correct location factor listed on page 7 or 8.
    4. Add, when appropriate, the cost of a deck or porch, paving, fireplace, garage or carport, heating, extra plumbing fixtures,
    supporting walls, half story areas, construction on hillside lots, and construction in remote areas.
    See page 42.

    Square Foot Area
    Quality Class 400 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 1,300 1,400

    1, Best 224.12 202.24 187.21 176.11 167.58 160.83 155.26 150.61 146.72 143.25 140.31
    1 & 2 205.52 185.51 171.71 161.54 153.75 147.52 142.39 138.12 134.53 131.40 128.56
    2, Good 188.81 170.39 157.75 148.36 141.16 135.45 130.81 126.87 123.57 120.71 118.24
    2 & 3 178.31 160.86 148.90 140.07 133.34 127.96 123.50 119.79 116.62 114.00 111.62
    3, Average 168.06 151.65 140.35 132.05 125.61 120.54 116.40 112.93 109.99 107.38 105.20
    3 & 4 153.33 138.40 128.11 120.51 114.67 110.03 106.22 103.10 100.35 98.03 96.02
    4, Low 137.27 123.87 114.64 107.90 102.69 98.52 95.09 92.26 89.82 87.73 85.91

    Square Foot Area
    Quality Class 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 2,000 2,200 2,400 2,600 2,800 3,000 3,200

    1, Best 135.70 133.46 131.46 129.70 126.63 124.06 121.82 119.94 118.29 116.77 115.50
    1 & 2 124.97 122.89 121.11 119.43 116.61 114.24 112.23 110.45 108.90 107.58 106.37
    2, Good 115.30 113.38 111.73 110.23 107.61 105.42 103.56 101.94 100.53 99.28 98.15
    2 & 3 109.41 107.61 106.03 104.58 102.13 100.03 98.22 96.74 95.42 94.18 93.18
    3, Average 104.23 102.56 101.07 99.67 97.31 95.34 93.70 92.18 90.89 89.79 88.74
    3 & 4 95.70 94.18 92.76 91.52 89.34 87.53 86.01 84.66 83.45 82.40 81.51
    4, Low 85.18 83.92 82.79 80.80 79.15 77.79 76.51 75.51 74.53 73.70 72.58

    “A-Frame” Cabin, Class 2 & 3

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    “A-Frame” Cabins

    Residential Structures Section 41

    8 Corners

    Estimating Procedure
    1. Establish the structure quality class by applying the information on page 38.
    2. Multiply the structure floor area by the appropriate cost listed below.
    3. Multiply the total from step 2 by the correct location factor listed on page 7 or 8.
    4. Add, when appropriate, the cost of a deck or porch, paving, fireplace, garage or carport, heating, extra plumbing fixtures,
    supporting walls, half story areas, construction on hillside lots, and construction in remote areas.
    See page 42.

    Square Foot Area
    Quality Class 400 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 1,300 1,400

    1, Best 227.80 205.99 190.96 179.86 171.34 164.44 158.84 154.11 150.12 146.72 143.65
    1 & 2 208.87 188.97 175.17 164.97 157.09 150.80 145.68 141.37 137.68 134.53 131.75
    2, Good 191.51 173.19 160.61 151.21 144.06 138.29 133.52 129.59 126.25 123.36 120.77
    2 & 3 180.74 163.48 151.57 142.74 135.94 130.47 126.04 122.31 119.14 116.40 114.01
    3, Average 170.95 154.65 143.30 134.97 128.59 123.44 119.18 115.73 112.66 110.07 107.86
    3 & 4 155.33 140.55 130.23 122.63 116.81 112.12 108.32 105.14 102.38 100.07 97.99
    4, Low 139.26 125.92 116.72 109.94 104.73 100.51 97.10 94.22 91.78 89.67 87.84

    Square Foot Area
    Quality Class 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 2,000 2,200 2,400 2,600 2,800 3,000 3,200

    1, Best 139.14 136.90 134.91 133.14 130.03 127.44 125.21 123.37 121.69 120.27 119.03
    1 & 2 125.81 123.77 121.96 120.33 117.51 115.19 113.20 111.52 109.99 108.73 107.50
    2, Good 118.22 116.25 114.56 113.08 110.43 108.22 106.37 104.76 103.35 102.13 101.05
    2 & 3 111.94 110.07 108.49 107.06 104.57 102.45 100.77 99.20 97.83 96.72 95.66
    3, Average 106.62 104.87 103.33 101.94 99.58 97.64 95.99 94.54 93.25 92.09 91.11
    3 & 4 97.79 96.19 94.74 93.53 91.35 89.53 88.02 86.69 85.54 84.53 83.61
    4, Low 87.16 85.88 84.77 82.77 81.12 79.70 78.50 77.46 76.51 75.76 74.58

    “A-Frame” Cabin, Class 2

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Cabins and Recreational Dwellings

    42 Residential Structures Section

    Additional Costs

    Half-Story Costs
    For conventional recreational dwellings, use the suggested fractions found on page 30 in the section “Additional Costs for
    Residential Structures.” For “A-Frame” cabins, use one of the following costs: A simple platform with low cost floor cover,
    minimum partitions, and minimum lighting costs $65 to $95 per square foot. Average quality half story area with average
    quality carpet, average number of partitions finished with gypsum wallboard or plywood veneer and average lighting costs
    $95 to $105 per square foot. A good quality half story area with good carpet, decorative rustic partitions, ceiling beams and
    good lighting costs $125 to $145 per square foot.

    Decks and Porches, per square foot
    2″ wood deck with steps and railing (300 S.F. base)
    1′ to 4′ above ground $23.37 to $27.28
    Over 4′ to 6′ above ground 27.07 to 35.00
    Over 6′ to 9′ above ground 28.31 to 37.06
    Over 9′ to 12′ above ground 29.34 to 38.81
    Over 12′ above ground 30.88 to 40.14

    Fireplaces, 2-story, including foundation

    Metal hood with concrete slab $2,734 to $3,386
    Prefabricated, zero clearance 3,920 to 5,884
    Simple concrete block 4,790 to 7,973
    Concrete block with stone facing 6,320 to 9,610
    Simple natural stone 10,905 to 15,820

    Extra Plumbing, cost each

    Lavatory $1,680 to $2,465
    Water closet or bidet 2,050 to 2,516
    Tub and shower 2,160 to 2,880
    Stall shower 1,612 to 2,350
    Laundry or utility sink 1,175 to 1,390

    Heating, cost each

    Wall furnace, 35,000 Btu $1,330
    Wall furnace, 65,000 Btu 1,630
    Baseboard hot water, per SF* 5.20
    Central heating, perimeter ducts, per S.F.* 7.28
    *Cost is per SF of floor area heated.

    Garages, Carports and Basements

    For garage, carport and basement costs for conventional
    recreational dwellings, see pages 27 and 29.

    Flatwork, per square foot
    Asphalt paving $4.53 to $6.80
    4″ concrete 4.65 to 7.00
    6″ concrete 4.94 to 7.20

    Reinforced concrete walls, per C.F.

    Formed one side only $18.70 to $21.65
    Formed both sides 23.98 to 27.10

    Supporting Wall Costs

    Cabins and recreational dwellings built on sloping lots cost more than if they are built on level lots. The cost of supporting
    walls of a building that do not enclose any living area should be estimated by using the figures below. These costs include
    everything above a normal foundation (12″ to 18″ above ground) up to the bottom of the next floor structure where square foot
    costs can be applied. In addition to the cost of supporting walls, add the cost of any extra structural members and the higher
    cost of building on a slope. A good rule of thumb for this is to add $870 for each foot of vertical distance between the highest
    and the lowest points of intersection of foundation and ground level.

    Wood posts, per foot of height

    4″ x 4″ $2.30 to $3.65
    4″ x 6″ 3.65 to 6.25
    6″ x 6″ 4.71 to 8.89
    8″ x 8″ 10.64 to 16.54
    10″ x 10″ 19.70 to 28.23
    12″ x 12″ 29.62 to 41.20

    Brick, per square foot of wall

    8″ common brick $36.96 to $45.20
    12″ common brick 56.79 to 70.54
    8″ common brick, 1 side face brick 46.89 to 57.84
    12″ common brick, 1 side face brick 73.34 to 91.42

    Reinforced concrete block,
    per square foot of wall

    8″ natural $8.94 to $10.80
    8″ colored 12.31 to 14.45
    8″ detailed blocks, natural 10.18 to 13.35
    8″ detailed blocks, colored 13.86 to 15.68
    8″ sandblasted 10.80 to 12.65
    8″ splitface, natural 9.21 to 10.86
    8″ splitface, colored 14.44 to 16.30
    8″ slump block, natural 9.89 to 12.31
    8″ slump block, colored 13.72 to 15.88
    12″ natural 17.45 to 19.51

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    Life in Years and Depreciation for Residences

    Residential Structures Section 43

    Quality Class 1 2 3 4 5 6

    Single family residences 70 70 70 60 60 55
    Manufactured housing 45 40 40 30 30
    Multi-family residences 60 60 55 55 50
    Motels 60 55 55 50
    Conventional recreational dwellings 70 60 60 55 55 50
    A-frame cabins 60 55 55 50

    This table shows typical physical lives in years in the absence of unusual physical, functional or economic obsolescence.
    Raise half classes to the next higher whole class.

    To Find the Present Value of an Existing Residence
    Present value is the replacement cost less depreciation (inverse of the “% Good” column below). Multiply the appropriate
    figure in the “% good” column by the current replacement cost developed using this manual to find the present value. For
    newer residences, the chronological age (“Age” column) is usually the best indicator of percent good. The present value of
    older residences may be influenced more by physical, functional or economic obsolescence than by age. When physical,
    functional or economic conditions limit or extend the remaining useful life of a residence, estimate that life in years and use
    the “Rem. Life” column (rather than the “Age” column) to find the percent good.

    20 Years 25 Years 30 Years 40 Years 45 Years 50 Years 55 Years 60 Years 70 Years
    Rem. % Rem. % Rem. % Rem. % Rem. % Rem. % Rem. % Rem. % Rem. %
    Age Life Good Life Good Life Good Life Good Age Life Good Life Good Life Good Life Good Life Good

    0 20 100 25 100 30 100 40 100 0 45 100 50 100 55 100 60 100 70 100
    1 19 94 24 95 29 96 39 98 2 43 97 48 97 53 98 58 98 68 99
    2 18 88 23 90 28 93 38 96 4 41 93 46 94 51 96 56 96 66 98
    3 17 81 22 86 27 89 37 94 6 39 89 44 91 49 94 54 94 64 97
    4 16 75 21 81 26 86 36 92 8 37 85 42 88 47 91 52 92 62 96
    5 15 69 20 77 25 82 35 90 10 35 81 39 85 45 88 50 90 60 95
    6 14 63 19 72 24 79 34 87 12 33 77 38 82 43 85 48 88 58 93
    7 13 59 18 68 23 75 33 84 14 32 73 36 78 41 82 46 86 56 92
    8 12 57 17 63 22 71 32 82 16 30 69 35 74 40 79 45 83 54 90
    9 11 55 16 60 21 67 31 80 18 28 65 33 70 38 76 43 80 52 89
    10 11 53 16 58 20 64 30 77 20 26 60 31 67 36 73 41 77 50 87
    11 10 50 15 56 19 60 29 74 22 24 58 29 63 34 69 39 74 48 86
    12 9 48 14 54 19 59 28 72 24 23 56 28 60 32 65 37 71 46 84
    13 8 46 13 53 18 57 27 70 26 22 54 26 58 31 62 35 68 44 82
    14 7 44 12 51 17 56 27 67 28 20 52 24 56 29 60 34 65 42 80
    15 7 42 11 49 16 54 26 65 30 18 50 23 54 27 58 32 63 40 78
    16 6 40 11 48 15 53 25 62 32 17 48 21 53 26 56 30 60 38 76
    17 5 38 10 46 14 52 24 60 34 15 47 20 51 24 55 29 58 36 73
    18 5 36 9 44 13 50 23 59 36 14 45 18 49 23 53 27 57 34 71
    19 4 33 8 43 13 49 22 58 38 12 43 17 47 21 51 26 55 32 68
    20 4 31 7 41 12 47 21 58 40 11 41 16 45 20 50 24 54 30 65
    21 3 29 7 39 11 46 21 55 42 10 39 14 44 19 48 23 52 28 62
    22 3 27 6 37 11 44 20 54 44 9 37 13 42 17 46 21 51 26 59
    23 3 25 6 35 10 43 19 53 46 8 35 12 40 16 45 20 49 25 56
    24 3 23 5 34 9 42 18 52 48 7 33 11 38 15 43 19 47 23 54
    25 2 21 5 32 9 40 17 51 50 6 31 10 37 14 41 18 46 21 49
    26 2 19 4 30 8 39 17 50 52 5 29 9 35 12 40 16 44 19 45
    27 2 16 4 29 7 37 16 49 54 5 28 8 33 11 38 15 43 18 44
    28 2 14 4 27 7 36 15 48 56 4 26 7 31 10 36 14 41 16 42
    29 2 12 3 25 6 34 14 47 58 4 24 6 30 9 35 13 40 15 38
    30 1 10 3 24 6 33 14 46 60 3 22 5 28 8 33 12 38 14 36
    31 – – 3 22 5 31 13 45 62 3 20 4 26 7 31 11 37 12 31
    32 – – 3 20 5 30 12 44 64 3 17 4 24 6 30 10 35 11 30
    33 – – 2 18 5 29 12 43 66 2 16 3 22 5 28 9 33 10 27
    34 – – 2 17 4 27 11 42 68 2 14 3 21 5 27 8 32 9 25
    35 – – 2 15 4 26 11 41 70 2 12 3 19 4 25 7 30 9 24
    36 – – 2 13 4 24 10 40 72 1 10 2 17 4 23 6 29 8 21
    38 – – 1 10 3 21 9 38 74 – – 2 15 4 21 5 27 7 20
    40 – – – – 2 19 7 35 76 – – 2 14 3 20 5 26 7 19
    42 – – – – 2 16 6 33 80 – – 1 10 2 17 4 23 7 18
    46 – – – – 1 10 5 29 82 – – – – 2 15 3 20 6 17
    50 – – – – – – 4 25 84 – – – – 1 10 2 17 5 16
    55 – – – – – – 3 20 96 – – – – – – 1 10 3 14
    60 – – – – – – 2 14 98 – – – – – – – – 2 12
    64 – – – – – – 1 10 100 – – – – – – – – 1 10

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    A
    Adjustment factors, live load . . . . .229
    Adjustments, wall heights . . . . . . . . .5
    Adjustments for area . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
    Administrative office (military) . . . .272
    A-frame . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
    A-frame cabins . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-41

    4 corners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39
    6 corners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
    8 corners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41

    A-frame restaurants . . . . . . . .183-184
    Age factors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9
    Agricultural structures . . . . . .249-269
    Air and water service . . . . . . . . . . .205
    Air compressors . . . . . . . . . . . . . .206
    Air conditioning . . . . . . . . .18, 28, 266
    Aircraft avionics shop (military) . . .272
    Aircraft machine shop (military) . . .272
    Aircraft operations (military) . . . . .272
    Ambulatory clinic (military) . . . . . .272
    Appliances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
    Applied instruction building
    (military) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .272

    Area modification factors . . . . . .6, 7-8
    Area of buildings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
    Auto service centers . . . . . . . .218-221
    Automatic teller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125
    Average Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43

    B
    Balconies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
    Banks and savings offices . . .115-125
    Barns . . . . . . . . . . .250-252, 256-260

    dairy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .257-260
    feed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .252
    general purpose . . . . . . . . . . . .250
    hay storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .251
    herringbone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .260
    low cost . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .257
    pole . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .256
    stanchion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .258
    walk-through . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .259

    Barracks, dormitory (military) . . . .272
    Baseboard units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
    Basement garages . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
    Basements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .237
    Basements, residential . . . . . . . . . .27
    Bathrooms, multi-family
    residential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30

    Block, concrete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
    Bowling alley (on military base) . . .272
    Boxes, walk-in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .242
    Brick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
    Buffet hutch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
    Building classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
    Building quality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
    Building shapes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
    Built-ins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
    Bulkheads . . . . . . . . . . .242, 244, 245
    Bumpers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .247

    C
    Cabins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32, 38-42
    Cages, poultry . . . . . . .262, 263, 264,

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .265, 266
    Canopies . . . . . . . . . . . .204, 232, 237
    Canopy lights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .237
    Carports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18, 29, 42
    Cash boxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .205
    Catch basin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .248
    Ceilings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .245

    Central air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18, 28
    Chain link fence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .248
    Chapel center (on military base) . .272
    Child development center
    (on military base) . . . . . . . . . . . .272

    Churches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .172-173
    City hall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56, 59
    Classes, quality . . . . . .11, 16, 19, 23,
    33, 38, 44, 47, 50, 53, 56, 59, 76, 82,
    89, 94, 103, 105, 107, 109, 111, 113,
    115, 120, 126, 129, 132, 135, 143,
    151, 159, 167, 169, 171, 173, 175,
    178, 181, 183, 185, 191, 195-196,
    198, 200, 202, 208, 213, 218, 223,
    227, 244, 250-255, 257-260,
    262-265, 267, 268

    Classrooms, temporary . . . . . . . . . .55
    Coffee shop restaurants . . . . .178-180
    Commercial structures . . . . . . .74-248
    Commissary (military) . . . . . . . . . .272
    Compressors, refrigeration . . . . . .261
    Concrete block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
    Concrete decks, uncovered . . . . . . .27
    Concrete paving . . . . . . . . . . . . . .247
    Concrete walls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
    Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
    Convalescent hospitals . . . . .167-169
    Conventional recreational dwellings

    4 corners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
    6 corners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
    8 corners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36

    10 corners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
    Conventional restaurants . . . .181-182
    Coolers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
    Coolers, evaporative . . . . . . . . . . .266
    Cooling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
    Cooling pads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .266
    Corral, holding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .261
    Cost tables, explanation . . . . . . . . . . .4
    Counters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125
    Covered porches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27
    Curbing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .206
    Curbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .247
    Current dollar costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

    D
    Dairy barns . . . . . . . . . . . . . .257-260
    Dampers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .234
    Deck roofs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
    Decks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42

    concrete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27
    Decks and porches . . . . . . .18, 27, 42
    Dental clinic (on military base) . . .272
    Department stores . . . . . . . . .126-134
    Depreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6, 43
    Dining facility (on military base) . .272
    Discount houses . . . . . . . . . .111-114
    Dishwasher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
    Dispensers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .204
    Display fronts . . . . . . . . . . . .242- 245
    Display platforms . . . . . . . . . . . . .245
    Display signs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .246
    Dock levelers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .237
    Docks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .237
    Domes, skylights . . . . . . . . . . . . . .240
    Door hoods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .233
    Doors

    exterior . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .238
    fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .238
    hollow metal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .232
    interior . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .238
    roll-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .238
    sidewall, sliding . . . . . . . . . . . .232

    walk-thru . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .232
    warehouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .238

    Downspouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .233
    Drainage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .248
    Draperies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .238
    Dumbwaiters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .238

    E
    Ecclesiastic buildings . . . . . .173-174
    Economic obsolescence . . . . . . . . . .6
    Education center (on
    military base) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .272

    Effective age . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
    Electric heating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .239
    Elementary school (military
    dependents) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .272

    Elementary schools . . . . . . . . . .44-49
    Elevators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30, 238
    Entrances . . . . . . .136-141, 144-149,

    . . . . . . . . . .152-157, 160-165, 245
    Equipment room . . . . . . . . . .258, 259
    Equipment shed . . . . . . . . . .254, 260
    Escalators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .238
    Evaporative cooler . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
    Explanation of tables . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
    External access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125
    External offices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .227
    Extinguishers, fire . . . . . . . . . . . . .239

    F
    Factory buildings . . . . . . . . . . . . . .226
    Family housing (on military
    base) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .272

    Family service center (military) . . .272
    Fans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .266
    Feed barns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .252
    Feed tanks, bulk . . . . . . . . . . . . . .269
    Feeders, automatic . . . . . . . . . . . .266
    Fence

    cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .261
    chain link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .248
    metal rail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .261
    wood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .248

    Fencing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .206
    Fill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .239
    Finishes, wall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .245
    Fire and rescue station
    (on military base) . . . . . . . . . . . .272

    Fire escapes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .239
    Fire extinguishers . . . . . . . . . . . . .239
    Fire sprinklers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .239
    Fire stations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68

    on military base . . . . . . . . . . . . .272
    Fireplaces . . . . . . . . . .18, 29, 42, 239
    Fixtures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125
    Flatwork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42, 261
    Floor furnaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
    Foggers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .266
    Foundations, permanent, for
    manufactured housing . . . . . . . . . .18

    Framed openings . . . . . . . . . . . . .233
    Functional obsolescence . . . . . . . . . .6
    Funeral homes . . . . . . . . . . . .171-172
    Furnaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28

    G
    Garages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29, 31, 42

    basement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
    ground level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
    separate structure . . . . . . . . . . . .31

    Garbage disposal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18

    Gasoline storage tanks . . . . . . . . . .205
    Gates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .247-261
    General office buildings . . . . .135-150
    General purpose barns . . . . . . . . . .250
    Glass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .245
    Government offices . . . . . . . . . .56-61
    Greenhouses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .267
    Gutters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .233

    H
    Half classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
    Half-baths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
    Half-story costs . . . . . . . . . . . . .30, 42
    Hangars (military) . . . . . . . . . . . . .272
    Hay shelters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .261
    Hay storage barns . . . . . . . . . . . . .251
    Heat and smoke vents . . . . . . . . . .241
    Heaters

    baseboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .239
    electric . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28, 239
    suspended . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .239

    Heating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42, 266
    Heating and cooling . . . . . . . .28, 239
    Herringbone barns . . . . . . . . . . . . .260
    High school (military
    dependents) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .272

    Historical index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9
    Holding corral . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .261
    Holding tanks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .261
    Hospitals, convalescent . . . . .167-170
    How to use this book . . . . . . . . . . .4-6

    I
    Index, historical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9
    Industrial buildings . . . . . . . . . . . .223

    light . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .225
    Industrial structures . . . . . . . .222-248
    Installation maintenance shop
    (military) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .272

    Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
    Insulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .233
    Intercom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .237
    Internal offices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .227
    Island lighters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .205
    Island office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .204

    J
    Jr. high/middle school (military
    dependents) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .272

    K
    Kitchen equipment . . . . . . . . . . . .240

    L
    Laundry sinks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
    Libraries, public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
    Library (on military base) . . . . . . . .272
    Lifts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .237
    Light industrial buildings . . . . . . . .225
    Lighting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .245, 248
    Limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
    Livestock scales . . . . . . . . . . . . . .269
    Loading ramps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .237
    Loafing sheds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .261
    Local modifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-8
    Location adjustments . . . . . . . . . . . .6
    Lube room equipment . . . . . . . . . .205

    Index

    273

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    M
    Machinery and equipment sheds . .254
    Main Exchange (military) . . . . . . . .272
    Manholes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .248
    Manufactured housing . . . . . . . .16-18

    additional costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
    Material handling . . . . . . . . . . . . .242
    Medical clinic (on military base) . .272
    Medical facility (on military
    base) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .272

    Medical-dental buildings . . . .151-159
    Mezzanines . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125, 240
    Microwave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
    Migrant worker housing . . . . . . . . .268
    Military construction costs . . . . . . .270
    Milk house . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .257
    Milk line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .261
    Milking barn . . . . . . . . . . . . .258-260
    Mobile home parks . . . . . . . .195-197
    Mobile homes . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16-18
    Mortuaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .171-172
    Motels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23-26
    Multi-family residences . . . . . . .20-22
    Multi-unit buildings . . . . . . . . . .92-93

    N
    Night deposit vault . . . . . . . . . . . .125
    Normal Percent Good . . . . . . . . . .235

    O
    Obsolescence

    economic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
    functional . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
    physical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6

    Offices, external and internal . . . . .227
    Offices, government . . . . . . . . . .56-61
    Openings, framed . . . . . . . . . . . . .233
    Operations building (military) . . . .272
    Overhangs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .233
    Overhead heaters . . . . . . . . . . . . . .239

    P
    PA systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .237
    Parachute and dinghy
    shop (military) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .272

    Partitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .240
    interior . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .234

    Paving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .206
    asphaltic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .247
    concrete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .247

    Percent Good . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
    Percent Good table . . . . . . . . . . . .235
    Physical fitness training center
    (military) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .272

    Physical lives . . . . . . . . .43, 235, 269
    Physical obsolescence . . . . . . . . . . .6
    Platforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .245
    Plumbing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
    Pneumatic tube systems . . . . . . . .240
    Pole barns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .256
    Porch roofs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18, 27
    Porches, covered . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27
    Porches and decks . . . . . . . . . .18, 42
    Post mounting . . . . . . . . . . . .207, 246
    Posts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
    Poultry houses . . . . . . . . . . . .262-266

    controlled environment . . . . . . .263
    conventional . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .262

    deep pit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .265
    equipment costs . . . . . . . . . . . .266
    high rise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .264

    Prefabricated classrooms . . . . . . . .55
    Present Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
    Pressure tanks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .269
    Public address systems . . . . . . . . .237
    Public buildings

    elementary schools . . . . . . . .44-47
    libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
    secondary schools . . . . . . . . .50-55

    Pullmans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
    Pumps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .204

    Q
    Quality classes, explanation . . . . . . . .4
    Quality classifications

    A-frame cabins . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
    A-frame restaurants . . . . . . . . . .183
    auto service centers . . . . . . . . .218
    banks and savings offices .115, 120
    coffee shop restaurants . . . . . . .178
    convalescent hospitals . . .167, 169
    conventional recreational
    dwellings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33

    conventional restaurants . . . . . .181
    department stores . . .126, 129, 132
    discount houses . . . . . . . .111, 113
    display fronts . . . . . . . . . . . . . .244
    ecclesiastic buildings . . . . . . . .173
    feed barns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .252
    funeral homes . . . . . . . . . . . . . .171
    general office buildings . . .135, 143
    general purpose barns . . . . . . . .250
    government offices . . . . . . . .56, 59
    greenhouses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .267
    hay storage barns . . . . . . . . . . .251
    industrial buildings . . . . . . . . . .223
    internal offices . . . . . . . . . . . . .227
    machinery and equipment
    sheds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .254

    manufactured housing . . . . . . . . .16
    medical-dental buildings . .151, 159
    migrant worker housing . . . . . . .268
    mobile home parks . . . . . . . . . .195
    modern herringbone barns . . . .260
    motels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23
    multi-family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
    poultry houses . . . . . . . . . . . . .262
    schools, elementary . . . . .44-45, 47
    schools, secondary . . . . . . . .50-53
    self service restaurants . . . . . . .175
    service garages . . . . . . . . .208, 213
    service stations . . . . .198, 200, 202
    shop buildings . . . . . . . . . . . . .253
    single family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
    small food stores . . . . . . . .107, 109
    small sheds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .255
    suburban stores . . . . . . . . . . .89, 94
    supermarkets . . . . . . . . . .103, 105
    theaters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .185, 191
    urban stores . . . . . . . . . . . . .76, 82

    Quality specifications . . . . . . . . . . . .4

    R
    Rails and steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
    Ramp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .261
    Receiver systems, satellite . . . . . . .245
    Record storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125
    Recreation center (military) . . . . . .272
    Recreational dwellings . . . . . . . .32-42
    Regional medical center
    (military) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .272

    Remaining Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
    Reserve Center (military) . . . . . . . .272
    Residences

    multi-family . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19-22
    single family . . . . . . . . . . . . .10-15

    Residential structures section . . .10-43
    Restaurants

    A-frame . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .183-184
    coffee shop . . . . . . . . . . . .178-180
    conventional . . . . . . . . . . .181-182
    self service . . . . . . . . . . . .175-177

    Room coolers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
    Rotators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .206, 247

    S
    Safe deposit boxes . . . . . . . . . . . .125
    Satellite communications center
    (military) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .272

    Satellite receiver . . . . . . . . . . . . . .245
    Scales

    livestock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .269
    truck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .269

    Schools, elementary . . . . . . . . .44-47
    Schools, secondary . . . . . . . . . .50-55
    Screen walls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
    Seating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .240
    Secondary schools . . . . . . . . . . .50-55
    Security systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . .237
    Self service restaurants . . . . .175-178
    Septic tanks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .269
    Service club (military) . . . . . . . . . .272
    Service garages . . . . . . . . . . .208-213
    Service station signs . . . . . . . . . . .206
    Service stations . . . . . . . . . . .198-207

    additional costs . . . . . . . . .204-207
    Sheds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .254-255
    Shop buildings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .253
    Shopping centers . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88
    Showers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
    Sidewall doors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .232
    Signs, lighted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .246
    Single family residences . . . . . .10-15

    4 corners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12
    6 corners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
    8 corners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14

    10 corners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
    Sinks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
    Site improvement . . . . . . . . . . . . .206
    Skirting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
    Skylights . . . . . . . . . . . .234, 240, 241
    Sliding windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . .234
    Small food stores . . . . . . . . . .107-110
    Small sheds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .255
    Snowload capability . . . . . . . . . . . .18
    Sound systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .237
    Sprinklers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .261

    fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .239
    roof . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .266

    Stairways . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
    Stanchion barns . . . . . . . . . . . . . .258
    Stanchions, steel . . . . . . . . . . . . . .261
    Station hospital (military) . . . . . . .272
    Steel buildings . . . . . . . . . . . .228-234
    Steel stanchions . . . . . . . . . . . . . .261
    Steps and rails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
    Storage buildings . . . . . . . . . .18, 204
    Storage facility (military) . . . . . . . .272
    Storage tanks, gasoline . . . . . . . . .205
    Stores

    suburban . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88-102
    urban . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-87

    Striping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .247

    Suburban stores . . . . . . . . . . . .88-102
    Suite entrances

    exterior . . . . . . .136-138, 144-146,
    . . . . . . . . . . . . . .152-154, 160-162
    interior . . . . . . .139-141, 147-149,
    . . . . . . . . . . . . . .155-157, 163-165

    Sump pumps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .261
    Supermarkets . . . . . . . . . . . . .103-106

    T
    Table of Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
    Tanks, pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .269
    Temporary classrooms . . . . . . . . . .55
    Temporary lodging facility
    (military) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .272

    Theaters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .185-191
    Tie downs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
    Toilets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
    Trailer parks . . . . . . . . . . . . . .195-197
    Trash compactor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
    Truck scales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .269
    Turbines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .204

    U
    Unaccompanied officers quarters
    (military) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .272

    Urban stores . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-87

    V
    Vault doors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125
    Vehicle hoist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .206
    Vehicle maint. shop (military) . . . .272
    Ventilators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .234, 241
    Vents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .234, 241

    W
    Walk-in boxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .242
    Walk-through barns . . . . . . . . . . . .259
    Walk-thru doors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .232
    Wall finishes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .245
    Wall furnaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
    Wall heaters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
    Wall heights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
    Walls, bulkhead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .245
    Warehouses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .224
    Wash area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .261
    Water systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .269
    Water tanks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .261
    Wet bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
    Whirlpool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
    Window frames . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .245
    Windows

    aluminum industrial . . . . . . . . .234
    aluminum sliding . . . . . . . . . . .234
    steel sliding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .234

    Wood decks, uncovered . . . . . . . . .27
    Wood fence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .248
    Wood posts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42

    Y
    Yard improvements . . . . . . . .247-248
    Yard lights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .205
    Youth center (military
    dependents) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .272

    274

    Index
    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    PP rr acac tictic al Refal Ref erer encenc es fes f or Buildersor Builders
    National Construction Estimator

    Current building costs for residential, comer-
    cial, and industrial construction. Estimated
    prices for every common building material.
    Provides manhours, recommended crew, and
    gives the labor cost for installation. Includes a
    free download of an electronic version of the
    book with National Estimator, a stand-alone
    Windows™ estimating program. An interac-
    tive multimedia video that shows how to use

    the software to compile construction cost estimates is free at
    www.costbook.com. 672 pages, 8½ x 11, $87.50. Revised annually

    eBook (PDF) also available, $43.75 at www.craftsman-book.com

    Getting Financing & Developing Land

    Developing land is a major leap for most
    builders — yet that’s where the big money is
    made. This book gives you the practical knowl-
    edge you need to make that leap. Learn how to
    prepare a market study, select a building site,
    obtain financing, guide your plans through
    approval, and then control your building costs
    so you can ensure yourself a good profit.
    Includes a CD-ROM with forms, checklists, and a
    sample business plan you can customize and use to help you sell
    your idea to lenders and investors.
    232 pages, 8½ x 11, $39.00

    eBook (PDF) also available; $19.50 at www.craftsman-book.com

    Construction Forms for Contractors

    This practical guide contains 78 useful forms,
    letters and checklists, guaranteed to help you
    streamline your office, organize your jobsites,
    gather and manage records and documents,
    keep a handle on your subs, reduce estimating
    errors, administer change orders and lien issues,
    monitor crew productivity, track your equip-
    ment use, and more. Includes accounting forms,
    change order forms, forms for customers, esti-

    mating forms, field work forms, HR forms, lien forms, office forms,
    bids and proposals, subcontracts, and more. All are also on the CD-
    ROM included, in Excel spreadsheets, as formatted Rich Text that
    you can fill out on your computer, and as PDFs.
    360 pages, 8½ x 11, $48.50

    eBook (PDF) also available; $24.25 at www.craftsman-book.com

    Contractor’s Guide to Change Orders

    This book gives you the ammunition you need to keep contract
    disputes from robbing you of your profit. You’ll learn how to iden-
    tify trouble spots in your contract, plans, specifications and site;
    negotiate and resolve change order disputes, and collect facts for
    evidence to support your claims. You’ll also find detailed checklists
    to organize your procedures, field-tested sample forms and work-
    sheets ready for duplication, and various professional letters for
    almost any situation. 382 pages, 8½ x 11, $79.00

    Drafting House Plans

    Here you’ll find step-by-step instructions for drawing a complete
    set of house plans for a one-story house, an addition to an existing
    house, or a remodeling project. This book shows how to visualize
    spatial relationships, use architectural scales and symbols, sketch
    preliminary drawings, develop detailed floor plans and exterior
    elevations, and prepare a final plot plan. It even includes code-
    approved joist and rafter spans and how to make sure that draw-
    ings meet code requirements. 185 pages, 8½ x 11, $34.95

    Residential Property Inspection Reports on CD-ROM

    This CD-ROM contains 50 pages of property inspection forms in
    both Rich Text and PDF formats. You can easily customize each
    form with your logo and address, and use them for your home
    inspections. Use the CD-ROM to write your inspections with your
    word processor, print them, and save copies for your records.
    Includes inspection forms for grounds and exterior, foundations,
    garages and carports, roofs and attics, pools and spas, electrical,
    plumbing, and HVAC, living rooms, family rooms, dens, studies,
    kitchens, breakfast rooms, dining rooms, hallways, stairways,
    entries, laundry rooms. $79.95

    Journeyman Electrician’s Preparation & Study Guide

    This is not only a great study guide filled with sample electrician’s
    exam questions — it teaches you how to quickly turn to the code
    section that answers the questions. Most electrician’s exams give
    you about 2 minutes per question — not enough time to browse
    through 800 pages of fine print looking for each answer. This man-
    ual, based on the 2008 and 2011 NEC editions, explains how the
    Code is organized, so you understand where the information you
    need is located. Then it shows how to rearrange and tab your copy
    of the Code to streamline your search efforts. Next, you learn a
    step-by-step search procedure, in which you’re shown how to ana-
    lyze the question to determine its subject, know where to look in
    the index, find the exact article, then turn right to the Code section
    that answers your question. 96 pages, 8½ x 11, $34.00
    $25.50 – 25% discount, Cosmetic Defect

    eBook (PDF) also available; $17.00 at www.craftsman-book.com

    Paper Contracting: The How-To of
    Construction Management Contracting

    Risk, and the headaches that go with it, have always been a major
    part of any construction project — risk of loss, negative cash flow,
    construction claims, regulations, excessive changes, disputes, slow
    pay — sometimes you’ll make money, and often you won’t. But
    many contractors today are avoiding almost all of that risk by work-
    ing under a construction management contract, where they are sim-
    ply a paid consultant to the owner, running the job, but leaving him
    the risk. This manual is the how-to of construction management
    contracting. You’ll learn how the process works, how to get started
    as a CM contractor, what the job entails, how to deal with the issues
    that come up, when to step back, and how to get the job completed
    on time and on budget. Includes a link to free downloads of CM con-
    tracts legal in each state. 272 pages, 8½ x 11, $55.50

    eBook (PDF) also available; $27.75 at www.craftsman-book.com

    Construction Contract Writer

    Relying on a “one-size-fits-all” boilerplate
    construction contract to fit your jobs can
    be dangerous — almost as dangerous as a
    handshake agreement. Construction Con-
    tract Writer lets you draft a contract in min-
    utes that precisely fits your needs and the
    particular job, and meets both state and federal requirements. You
    just answer a series of questions — like an interview — to con-
    struct a legal contract for each project you take on. Anticipate
    where disputes could arise and settle them in the contract before
    they happen. Include the warranty protection you intend, the pay-
    ment schedule, and create subcontracts from the prime contract
    by just clicking a box. Includes a feedback button to an attorney on
    the Craftsman staff to help should you get stumped — No extra
    charge. $149.95. Download Construction Contract Writer at
    http://www.constructioncontractwriter.com

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    http://craftsman-book.com/

    http://craftsman-book.com/

    http://craftsman-book.com/

    http://craftsman-book.com/

    http://craftsman-book.com/

    http://craftsman-book.com/

    http://www.constructioncontractwriter.com/

    Insurance Restoration Contracting: Startup to Success

    Insurance restoration — the repair of buildings damaged by water,
    fire, smoke, storms, vandalism and other disasters — is an exciting
    field of construction that provides lucrative work immune to eco-
    nomic downturns. And, with insurance companies funding the
    repairs, your payment is virtually guaranteed. But this type of work
    requires special knowledge and equipment, and that’s what you’ll
    learn about in this book. It covers fire repairs and smoke damage,
    water losses and specialized drying methods, mold remediation, con-
    tent restoration, even damage to mobile and manufactured homes.
    You’ll also find information on equipment needs, training classes, esti-
    mating books and software, and how restoration leads to lucrative
    remodeling jobs. It covers all you need to know to start and succeed
    as the restoration contractor that both homeowners and insurance
    companies call on first for the best jobs. 640 pages, 8½ x 11, $69.00

    eBook (PDF) also available; $34.50 at www.craftsman-book.com

    Markup & Profit: A Contractor’s Guide, Revisited

    In order to succeed in a construction business, you have to be able
    to price your jobs to cover all labor, material and overhead expens-
    es, and make a decent profit. But calculating markup is only part of
    the picture. If you’re going to beat the odds and stay in business
    — profitably, you also need to know how to write good contracts,
    manage your crews, work with subcontractors and collect on your
    work. This book covers the business basics of running a construc-
    tion company, whether you’re a general or specialty contractor
    working in remodeling, new construction or commercial work. The
    principles outlined here apply to all construction-related busi-
    nesses. You’ll find tried and tested formulas to guarantee profits,
    with instructions and easy-to-follow examples to help you learn
    how to operate your business successfully. Includes a link to free
    downloads of blank forms and checklists used in this book.
    336 pages, 8½ x 11, $47.50

    Also available as an eBook (ePub, mobi for Kindle), $39.95 at
    www.craftsman-book.com

    Estimating & Bidding for Builders & Remodelers

    This 5th edition has all the information you need for estimating
    and bidding new construction and home improvement projects.
    It shows how to select jobs that will be profitable, do a labor and
    materials take-off from the plans, calculate overhead and figure
    your markup, and schedule the work. Includes a CD with an easy-
    to-use construction estimating program and a database of 50,000
    current labor and material cost estimates for new construction
    and home improvement work, with area modifiers for every zip
    code. Price updates on the Web are free and automatic.
    272 pages, 8½ x 11, $89.50

    eBook (PDF) also available; $44.75 at www.craftsman-book.com

    Estimating Home Building Costs, Revised

    Estimate every phase of residential construction from site costs to
    the profit margin you include in your bid. Shows how to keep track
    of manhours and make accurate labor cost estimates for site clear-
    ing and excavation, footings, foundations, framing and sheathing
    finishes, electrical, plumbing, and more. Provides and explains
    sample cost estimate worksheets with complete instructions for
    each job phase. This practical guide to estimating home construc-
    tion costs has been updated with digital Excel estimating forms
    and worksheets that ensure accurate and complete estimates for
    your residential projects. Enter your project information on the
    worksheets and Excel automatically totals each material and labor
    cost from every stage of construction to a final cost estimate
    worksheet. Load the enclosed CD-ROM into your computer and
    create your own estimate as you follow along with the step-by-
    step techniques in this book. 336 pages, 8½ x 11, $38.00

    eBook (PDF) also available; $19.00 at www.craftsman-book.com

    Contractor’s Plain-English Legal Guide

    For today’s contractors, legal problems are like snakes in the
    swamp — you might not see them, but you know they’re there.
    This book tells you where the snakes are hiding and directs you to
    the safe path. With the directions in this easy-to-read handbook
    you’re less likely to need a $250-an-hour lawyer. Includes simple
    directions for starting your business, writing contracts that cover
    just about any eventuality, collecting what’s owed you, filing liens,
    protecting yourself from unethical subcontractors, and more. For
    about the price of 15 minutes in a lawyer’s office, you’ll have a
    guide that will make many of those visits unnecessary. Includes a
    CD-ROM with blank copies of all the forms and contracts in the
    book. 272 pages, 8½ x 11, $49.50

    Craftsman’s Construction Installation Encyclopedia

    Step-by-step installation instructions for just about any residential
    construction, remodeling or repair task, arranged alphabetically,
    from Acoustic tile to Wood flooring. Includes hundreds of illustra-
    tions that show how to build, install, or remodel each part of the
    job, as well as manhour tables for each work item so you can esti-
    mate and bid with confidence. Also includes a CD-ROM with all
    the material in the book, handy look-up features, and the ability to
    capture and print out for your crew the instructions and diagrams
    for any job. 792 pages, 8½ x 11, $65.00

    eBook (PDF) also available; $32.50 at www.craftsman-book.com

    Estimating With Microsoft Excel, 3rd Ed.

    Step-by-step instructions show you how to create your own cus-
    tomized automated spreadsheet estimating program for use with
    Excel 2007.You’ll learn how to use the magic of Excel to create all the
    forms you need; detail sheets, cost breakdown summaries, and
    more. With Excel as your tool, you can easily estimate costs for all
    phases of the job, from pulling permits, to concrete, rebar, and roof-
    ing. You’ll see how to create your own formulas and macros and
    apply them in your everyday projects. If you’ve wanted to use Excel,
    but were unsure of how to make use of all its features, let this new
    book show you how. Includes a CD-ROM that illustrates examples in
    the book and provides you with templates you can use to set up
    your own estimating system. 158 pages, 5½ x 9, $44.95

    Construction Estimating Reference Data

    Provides the 300 most useful manhour tables for practically every
    item of construction. Labor requirements are listed for sitework,
    concrete work, masonry, steel, carpentry, thermal and moisture
    protection, doors and windows, finishes, mechanical and electri-
    cal. Each section details the work being estimated and gives
    appropriate crew size and equipment needed. Includes a CD-ROM
    with an electronic version of the book with National Estimator, a
    stand-alone WindowsTM estimating program, plus an interactive
    multimedia video that shows how to use the disk to compile con-
    struction cost estimates. 384 pages, 11 x 8½, $59.00

    eBook (PDF) also available, $29.50 at www.craftsman-book.com

    Masonry & Concrete Construction Revised

    Shows on-site preplanning and layout through the construction of
    footings, foundations, walls, fireplaces and chimneys. An added
    appendix on safety regulations, with a condensed OSHA reference.
    Improved bid-winning estimating techniques. The emphasis is on
    integrating new techniques and materials with tried-and-true
    methods. Includes information on cement and mortar types, mixes,
    coloring agents and additives, and suggestions on when, where
    and how to use them; calculating footing and foundation loads,
    with reference tables and formulas; forming materials and systems;
    pouring and reinforcing concrete slabs and flatwork; block and
    brick wall construction, with seismic requirements; crack control,
    masonry veneer construction, brick floors and pavements, design
    considerations and materials; cleaning, painting and repairing all
    types of masonry. 304 pages, 8½ x 11, $37.75

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    http://craftsman-book.com/

    http://craftsman-book.com/

    http://craftsman-book.com/

    http://craftsman-book.com/

    CD Estimator

    If your computer has WindowsTM and a CD-ROM drive, CD Estimator
    puts at your fingertips over 150,000 construction costs for new con-
    struction, remodeling, renovation & insurance repair, home
    improvement, framing & finish carpentry, electrical, concrete &
    masonry, painting, earthwork and heavy equipment, and plumbing
    & HVAC. Quarterly cost updates are available at no charge on the
    Internet. You’ll also have the National Estimator program — a stand-
    alone estimating program for WindowsTM that Remodeling maga-
    zine called a “computer wiz,”and Job Cost Wizard, a program that lets
    you export your estimates to QuickBooks Pro for actual job costing.
    A 60-minute interactive video teaches you how to use this CD-ROM
    to estimate construction costs. And to top it off, to help you create
    professional-looking estimates, the disk includes over 40 construc-
    tion estimating and bidding forms in a format that’s perfect for
    nearly any WindowsTM word processing or spreadsheet program.
    CD Estimator is $133.50

    Standard Estimating Practice, 9th Edition

    Estimating isn’t always an easy job. Sometimes snap decisions can
    produce negative long-term effects. This book was designed by
    the American Society of Professional Estimators as a set of stan-
    dards to guide professional estimators. It’s intended to help every
    estimator develop estimates that are uniform and verifiable. Every
    step that should be included in the estimate is listed, as well as
    aspects in the plans to consider when you’re estimating a job, and
    what you should look for that may not be included. The result
    should help you produce more consistently accurate estimates.
    852 pages, 8½ x 11, $95.00

    Construction Estimating

    This extremely well-organized book shows the best and easiest
    way to estimate materials for room additions or residential struc-
    tures. It gives estimating tables and procedures needed to make a
    fast, accurate, and complete material list of the structural mem-
    bers found in wood- and steel-framed buildings. This book is
    divided into 72 units, each of them covering a separate element in
    the estimating procedure. Covers estimating foundations, floor
    framing, wall framing, ceiling framing, roof framing, roofing mate-
    rials, exterior and interior finish materials, hardware, steel joist
    floor framing, steel stud framing, and steel ceiling joist and rafter
    framing. 496 pages, 8½ x 11, $49.50

    Construction Surveying & Layout

    A practical guide to simplified construction surveying. How to
    divide land, use a transit and tape to find a known point, draw
    an accurate survey map from your field notes, use topograph-
    ic surveys, and the right way to level and set grade. You’ll learn
    how to make a survey for any residential or commercial lot,
    driveway, road, or bridge — including how to figure cuts and
    fills and calculate excavation quantities. Use this guide to
    make your own surveys, or just read and verify the accuracy of
    surveys made by others. 244 pages, 8½ x 11, $51.95

    Residential Wiring to the 2011 NEC® eBook

    This completely revised book explains how to
    install rough and finish wiring in new construc-
    tion, alterations, and additions. It takes you from
    basic electrical theory to advanced wiring
    methods, updated to comply with the 2011
    National Electrical Code. You’ll find complete
    instructions on troubleshooting and repair of
    existing wiring, with hundreds of drawings and
    photos showing you how to plan and install

    wiring to code. Includes demand factors, circuit loads, and the for-
    mulas you need. Every subject is referenced to the 2011 NEC®, with
    many of the most-needed NEC® tables reproduced to help you
    install wiring that passes inspection the first time. 304 pages.

    Available only as an eBook (PDF); $24.00 at
    www.craftsman-book.com

    Residential Wiring to the 2008 NEC

    This completely revised manual explains in simple terms how to
    install rough and finish wiring in new construction, alterations,
    and additions. It takes you from basic electrical theory to current
    wiring methods that comply with the 2008 National Electrical
    Code. You’ll find complete instructions on troubleshooting and
    repairs of existing wiring, and how to extend service into additions
    and remodels. Hundreds of drawings and photos show you the
    tools and gauges you need, and how to plan and install the wiring.
    Includes demand factors, circuit loads, the formulas you need, and
    over 20 pages of the most-needed 2008 NEC tables to help your
    wiring pass inspection the first time. Includes a CD-ROM with an
    Interactive Study Center that helps you retain what you’ve
    learned, and study for the electrician’s exam. Also on the CD is the
    entire book in PDF format, with easy search features so you can
    quickly find answers to your residential wiring questions.
    304 pages, 8½ x 11, $42.00

    eBook (PDF) also available; $21.00 at www.craftsman-book.com

    Building Contractor’s Exam Preparation Guide

    Passing today’s contractor’s exams can be a major task. This book
    shows you how to study, how questions are likely to be worded,
    and the kinds of choices usually given for answers. Includes sam-
    ple questions from actual state, county, and city examinations,
    plus a sample exam to practice on. This book isn’t a substitute for
    the study material that your testing board recommends, but it will
    help prepare you for the types of questions — and their correct
    answers — that are likely to appear on the actual exam. Knowing
    how to answer these questions, as well as what to expect from the
    exam, can greatly increase your chances of passing.
    320 pages, 8½ x 11, $35.00

    Fences & Retaining Walls Revised eBook

    Everything you need to know to run a profitable
    business in fence and retaining wall contracting.
    Takes you through layout and design, construc-
    tion techniques for wood, masonry, and chain
    link fences, gates and entries, including finishing
    and electrical details. How to build retaining and
    rock walls. How to get your business off to the
    right start, keep the books, and estimate accu-
    rately. The book even includes a chapter on con-
    tractor’s math. 417 pages.

    Available only as an eBook (PDF, EPUB & MOBI/Kindle);
    $23.00 at www.craftsman-book.com

    2011 National Electrical Code

    This new electrical code incorporates sweeping improvements to
    make the code more functional and user-friendly. Here you’ll find
    the essential foundation for electrical code requirements for the
    21st century. With hundreds of significant and widespread
    changes, this 2011 NEC contains all the latest electrical technolo-
    gies, recently-developed techniques, and enhanced safety stan-
    dards for electrical work. This is the standard all electricians are
    required to know, even if it hasn’t yet been adopted by their local
    or state jurisdictions. 880 pages, 8½ x 11, $85.00
    Also available: 2008 National Electrical Code, $75.00

    Builder’s Guide to Accounting Revised

    Step-by-step, easy-to-follow guidelines for setting up and main-
    taining records for your building business. This practical guide to
    all accounting methods shows how to meet state and federal
    accounting requirements, explains the new depreciation rules,
    and describes how the Tax Reform Act can affect the way you keep
    records. Full of charts, diagrams, simple directions and examples to
    help you keep track of where your money is going. Recommended
    reading for many state contractor’s exams. Each chapter ends with
    a set of test questions, and a CD-ROM included FREE has all the
    questions in interactive self-test software. Use the Study Mode to
    make studying for the exam much easier, and Exam Mode to prac-
    tice your skills. 360 pages, 8½ x 11, $35.50

    eBook (PDF) also available; $17.75 at www.craftsman-book.com

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    http://craftsman-book.com/

    Pipe & Excavation Contracting Revised

    This popular manual has been updated and
    improved to bring it more current with modern
    earthmoving and trenching equipment, refined
    excavation techniques, stricter safety rules, and
    improved materials. Shows how to read plans
    and compute quantities for both trench and sur-
    face excavation, figure crew and equipment pro-
    ductivity rates, estimate unit costs, bid the work,
    and get the bonds you need. Learn how to

    choose the right equipment for each job, use GPS, how to lay all
    types of water and sewer pipe, work on steep slopes or in high
    groundwater, efficiently remove asphalt and rock, and the vari-
    ous pipe, joints and fittings now available. Explains how to
    switch your business to excavation work when you don’t have
    pipe contracts, and how to avoid the pitfalls that can wipe out
    your profits on any job. 328 pages, 8½ x 11, $35.00

    eBook (PDF) also available; $17.50 at www.craftsman-book.com

    Basic Engineering for Builders

    This book is for you if you’ve ever been stumped
    by an engineering problem on the job, yet
    wanted to avoid the expense of hiring a quali-
    fied engineer. Here you’ll find engineering prin-
    ciples explained in non-technical language and
    practical methods for applying them on the job.
    With the help of this book you’ll be able to
    understand engineering functions in the plans
    and how to meet the requirements, how to get
    permits issued without the help of an engineer, and anticipate
    requirements for concrete, steel, wood and masonry. See why you
    sometimes have to hire an engineer and what you can undertake
    yourself: surveying, concrete, lumber loads and stresses, steel,
    masonry, plumbing, and HVAC systems. This book is designed to
    help you, the builder, save money by understanding engineering
    principles that you can incorporate into the jobs you bid.
    400 pages, 8½ x 11, $39.50

    eBook (PDF) also available; $19.75 at www.craftsman-book.com

    Commercial Metal Stud Framing

    Framing commercial jobs can be more lucrative
    than residential work. But most commercial jobs
    require some form of metal stud framing. This
    book teaches step-by-step, with hundreds of
    job site photos, high-speed metal stud framing
    that works in both residential and commercial
    construction. It describes the special tools you’ll
    need, how to use them effectively, and the
    material and equipment you’ll be working with.

    You’ll find the shortcuts, tips and tricks-of-the-trade that take most
    steel framers years on the job to discover. Shows how to set up a
    crew to maintain a rhythm that will speed progress faster than any
    wood framing job. If you’ve framed with wood, this book will teach
    you how to be one of the few top-notch metal stud framers in
    both commercial and residential construction.
    208 pages, 8½ x 11, $45.00

    National Renovation & Insurance Repair Estimator

    Current prices in dollars and cents for hard-to-
    find items needed on most insurance, repair,
    remodeling, and renovation jobs. All price items
    include labor, material, and equipment break-
    outs, plus special charts that tell you exactly how
    these costs are calculated.. Includes a free down-
    load of an electronic version of the book with
    National Estimator, a stand-alone Windows™
    estimating program. An interactive multimedia
    video that shows how to use the software to

    compile renovation and repair cost estimates is free at www.crafts-
    man-book.com.488 pages, 8½ x 11, $89.50. Revised annually

    eBook (PDF) also available; $44.75 at www.craftsman-book.com

    Easy Scheduling

    Easy Scheduling presents you with a complete set of “real world”
    scheduling tools that are specifically tailored to meet the needs of
    small- to medium-sized construction businesses. Step by step, it
    shows you how to use Microsoft Project to build a schedule that
    will synchronize everyone’s efforts into an organized system that
    becomes the foundation of all planning and communication for
    all your jobs. You’ll see how to establish realistic project goals, set
    checkpoints, activities, relationships and time estimates for each
    task, as well as establish priorities. You’ll learn how to create a pro-
    ject flowchart to keep everyone focused and on track, and see
    how to use CSI (Construction Specification Institute) coding to
    organize and sort tasks, methods, and materials across multiple
    projects. If you want an easy way to schedule your jobs, Microsoft
    Project and Easy Scheduling is the answer for you. (Does not
    include Microsoft Project.) Published by BNI.
    316 pages, 8½ x 11, $59.95

    Code Check Complete, 2nd Edition

    Every essential building, electrical and mechanical code require-
    ment you’re likely to encounter when building or remodeling res-
    idential and light commercial structures. Based on the 2009
    International and Uniform Codes, and the 2008 and 2011 National
    Electrical Code, it’s endorsed by the International Code Council.
    Comes spiral-bound, with over 400 drawings, and has up-to-date
    answers to your code questions. Includes quick-glance summaries
    to alert you to important code changes. Compiled by code-certi-
    fied building/home inspectors, this new book is like having four
    guides in one — for building inspectors, design-professionals,
    plan reviewers, contractors, home inspectors, educators, and do-it-
    yourself homeowners. 234 pages, 6½ x 8½, $45.00

    Standard Plans For Public Works Construction, 2012 Ed.

    This visual reference, also updated and revised to comply with the
    Federal regulations for metric documentation, is the graphic com-
    panion to the “Greenbook.” Hundreds of detailed drawings, cross
    sections, design criteria, and dimensions graphically depict all
    aspects of public works construction. Every dimension is listed in
    both feet/inches and metric equivalents. This book, along with the
    “Greenbook,” sets the standard for quality and uniformity in pub-
    lic works construction. 375 pages, 8½ x 11, $92.50

    Greenbook Standard Specifications for
    Public Works Construction 2012

    The Greenbook gives approved standards for all types of public
    works construction — from the depth of paving on roads to the
    adhesive used on pavement markers. It standardizes public works
    plans and specs to provide guidelines for both cities and contrac-
    tors so they can agree on construction practices used in public
    works. The book has been adopted by over 200 cities, counties,
    and agencies throughout the U.S. The 2012 edition is the 16th edi-
    tion of this complete reference, providing uniform standards of
    quality and sound construction practice easily understood and
    used by engineers, public works officials, and contractors across
    the U.S. Includes hundreds of charts and tables.
    550 pages, 8½ x 11, $84.50

    Moving to Commercial Construction

    In commercial work, a single job can keep you and your crews busy
    for a year or more. The profit percentages are higher, but so is the
    risk involved. This book takes you step-by-step through the process
    of setting up a successful commercial business: finding work, esti-
    mating and bidding, value engineering, getting through the sub-
    mittal and shop drawing process, keeping a stable work force, con-
    trolling costs, and promoting your business. Explains the
    design/build and partnering business concepts and their advan-
    tage over the competitive bid process. Includes sample letters, con-
    tracts, checklists and forms that you can use in your business, plus a
    CD-ROM with blank copies in several word-processing formats for
    both MacTM and PC computers. 256 pages, 8½ x 11, $42.00

    eBook (PDF) also available; $21.00, at www.craftsman-book.com

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    http://craftsman-book.com/

    http://craftsman-book.com/

    http://craftsman-book.com/

    http://craftsman-book.com/

    Planning Drain, Waste & Vent Systems

    How to design plumbing systems in residential, commercial, and
    industrial buildings. Covers designing systems that meet code
    requirements for homes, commercial buildings, private sewage
    disposal systems, and even mobile home parks. Includes relevant
    code sections and many illustrations to guide you through what
    the code requires in designing drainage, waste, and vent systems.
    192 pages, 8½ x 11, $29.95

    Concrete Construction

    Just when you think you know all there is about
    concrete, many new innovations create faster,
    more efficient ways to do the work. This com-
    prehensive concrete manual has both the
    tried-and-tested methods and materials, and
    more recent innovations. It covers everything
    you need to know about concrete, along with
    Styrofoam forming systems, fiber reinforcing
    adjuncts, and some architectural innovations,
    like architectural foam elements, that can help

    you offer more in the jobs you bid on. Every chapter provides
    detailed, step-by-step instructions for each task, with hundreds of
    photographs and drawings that show exactly how the work is
    done. To keep your jobs organized, there are checklists for each
    stage of the concrete work, from planning, to finishing and pro-
    tecting your pours. Whether you’re doing residential or commer-
    cial work, this manual has the instructions, illustrations, charts, esti-
    mating data, rules of thumb and examples every contractor can
    apply on their concrete jobs. 288 pages, 8½ x 11, $28.75

    eBook (PDF) also available; $14.38 at www.craftsman-book.com

    Steel-Frame House Construction eBook

    Framing with steel has obvious advantages over
    wood, yet building with steel requires new skills
    that can present challenges to the wood builder.
    This book explains the secrets of steel framing
    techniques for building homes, whether pre-
    engineered or built stick by stick. It shows you the
    techniques, the tools, the materials, and how you
    can make it happen. Includes hundreds of photos
    and illustrations. 320 pages.

    Available only as an eBook (PDF) and software download;
    $19.88 at www.craftsman-book.com

    Excavation & Grading Handbook Revised

    The foreman’s, superintendent’s and operator’s
    guide to highway, subdivision and pipeline jobs:
    how to read plans and survey stake markings, set
    grade, excavate, compact, pave and lay pipe on
    nearly any job. Includes hundreds of informative,
    on-the-job photos and diagrams that even expe-
    rienced pros will find invaluable.This new edition
    has been completely revised to be current with
    state-of-the-art equipment usage and the most
    efficient excavating and grading techniques.

    You’ll learn how to read topo maps, use a laser level, set crows feet,
    cut drainage channels, lay or remove asphaltic concrete, and use
    GPS and sonar for absolute precision. For those in training, each
    chapter has a set of self-test questions, and a Study Center
    CD-ROM included has all 250 questions in a simple interactive for-
    mat to make learning easy and fun. 512 pages, 8½ x 11, $42.00

    eBook (PDF) also available; $21.00 at www.craftsman-book.com

    Home Builders’ Jobsite Codes 2012

    A spiral-bound, quick reference to the 2012
    International Residential Code that’s filled with
    easy-to-read and understand Code require-
    ments for every aspect of residential construc-
    tion. This user-friendly guide through the morass
    of the Code is packed with illustrations, tables,
    and figures, to illuminate your path to inspection
    and approval. 347 pages, 5½ x 8½, $21.95

    Sweets Green Building Square Foot Costbook 2015

    If your customers are demanding their buildings meet LEED®

    green building standards, estimating construction costs can rep-
    resent quite a challenge — especially if you’ve never built a green
    building before. This new book contains square foot prices for
    over 50 different types of green buildings, broken down by con-
    struction division. It includes articles on the cost of LEED® certifi-
    cation, green roof design, and the goals of other LEED® certified
    builders throughout the U.S. All of the costs in the book have been
    carefully adjusted for 2015. Included are government projects, res-
    idential and commercial buildings, schools and libraries, and med-
    ical and recreational facilities, reflecting the vast array of “green”
    materials and technologies used in construction today. If the
    unknown costs of building green have kept you from bidding on
    jobs you could have had, you’ll recover the cost of this book many
    times over in the future job bids you’re sure to win.
    204 pages, 8½ x 11, $59.95. Published by Building News Inc.

    Estimating Excavation Revised eBook

    How to calculate the amount of dirt you’ll have to
    move and the cost of owning and operating the
    machines you’ll do it with. Detailed, step-by-step
    instructions on how to assign bid prices to each
    part of the job, including labor and equipment
    costs. Also, the best ways to set up an organized
    and logical estimating system, take off from con-
    tour maps, estimate quantities in irregular areas,
    and figure your overhead. This revised edition
    includes a chapter on earthwork estimating software. As with any
    tool, you have to pick the right one. Written by an experienced dirt
    contractor and instructor of computer estimating software, this
    chapter covers the program types, explains how they work, gives
    the basics of how to use them, and discusses what will work best
    for the type of work you handle. This e-Book is the download ver-
    sion of the book in text searchable, PDF format. Craftsman eBooks
    are for use in the freely distributed Adobe Reader and are com-
    patible with Reader 6.0 or above. 550 pages.

    Available only as an eBook (PDF); $21.75, at
    www.craftsman-book.com

    The Blue Book Network Guide to Construction Costs 2014

    The Blue Book Network Guide to Construction Costs 2014 is a
    practical resource for all your construction estimating needs.
    Whether the job is for general construction, remodeling, building
    maintenance, or repair, the Blue Book Network Guide to
    Construction Costs provides the most accurate and up-to-date
    data for material and installation costs, labor and equipment rates,
    and even adjusted allowances for overhead and profit. The Blue
    Book also breaks down all unit and summary costs for every type
    of structure … all organized in the 16-Division CSI Masterformat. It
    also includes prevailing wage rates for over 400 U.S. Metropolitan
    areas (based on the latest data published by the Department of
    Labor), square foot costs, Americans with Disabilities costs (ADA),
    production and demolition rates, energy factors, purchasing costs,
    equipment rental rates and much more! 6½ x 11, $49.95

    Survive & Thrive in Building

    Are you ready for the housing rebound? For every home-builder
    casualty of a housing recession, there’s another one still in busi-
    ness. Which will you be? Business owners often learn how to run a
    successful company the hard way — through trial and error. But
    you don’t have to rely on this haphazard approach to
    entrepreneurship. As a home builder, you can have behind you the
    wisdom and experience of NAHB members who have weathered
    the ups and downs of the housing cycle. This book covers basic,
    but essential knowledge for running a successful company,
    whether you’re new to residential construction or a veteran
    builder. You’ll learn how to find a sustainable market niche, get
    financing for your projects, market your homes, achieve an opti-
    mal balance between sales volume and profit margin, understand
    financial reports, organize and insure your company to minimize
    risk, and find and keep the best employees and trade contractors.
    316 pages, 10 x 7, $39.95. Published by NAHB

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    http://craftsman-book.com/

    http://craftsman-book.com/

    http://craftsman-book.com/

    http://craftsman-book.com/

    Craftsman Book Company
    6058 Corte del Cedro
    Carlsbad, CA 92011

    Name

    e-mail address (for order tracking and special offers)

    Company

    Address

    City/State/Zip � This is a residence

    Total enclosed ________________ (In California add 7.5% tax)

    Free Media Mail shipping, within the US,
    when your check covers your order in full.

    In A Hurry?
    We accept phone orders charged to your

    � Visa, � MasterCard, � Discover or � American Express

    Card# ________________________________________________

    Exp. date___________________Initials ____________________
    Tax Deductible: Treasury regulations make these references tax deductible when
    used in your work. Save the canceled check or charge card statement as your
    receipt.

    � 39.50 Basic Engineering for Builders
    � 49.95 The Blue Book Network Guide to Construction Costs 2014
    � 35.50 Builder’s Guide to Accounting Revised
    � 32.50

    Building Code Compliance for Contractors & Inspectors

    � 35.00 Building Contractor’s Exam Preparation Guide
    � 133.50 CD Estimator
    � 45.00 Code Check Complete, 2nd Edition
    � 45.00 Commercial Metal Stud Framing
    � 28.75 Concrete Construction
    � 49.50 Construction Estimating
    � 59.50 Construction Estimating Reference Data
    � 48.50 Construction Forms for Contractractors
    � 51.95 Construction Surveying & Layout
    � 79.00 Contractor’s Guide to Change Orders
    � 68.50

    Contractor’s Guide to QuickBooks 2014

    � 58.50 Contractor’s Guide to QuickBooks 2012
    � 57.00 Contractor’s Guide to QuickBooks Pro 2010
    � 56.50 Contractor’s Guide to QuickBooks Pro 2009
    � 54.75 Contractor’s Guide to QuickBooks Pro 2008
    � 53.00 Contractor’s Guide to QuickBooks Pro 2007
    � 49.75 Contractor’s Guide to QuickBooks Pro 2005
    � 48.50 Contractor’s Guide to QuickBooks Pro 2004
    � 47.75 Contractor’s Guide to QuickBooks Pro 2003
    � 46.50 Contractor’s Guide to QuickBooks Pro 2002
    � 45.25 Contractor’s Guide to QuickBooks Pro 2001
    � 49.50 Contractor’s Plain-English Legal Guide
    � 65.00 Craftsman’s Construction Installation Encyclopedia
    � 34.95 Drafting House Plans
    � 59.95 Easy Scheduling

    � 89.50 Estimating & Bidding for Builders & Remodelers
    � 38.00 Estimating Home Building Costs, Revised
    � 44.95 Estimating With Microsoft Excel, 3rd Ed.
    � 42.00 Excavation & Grading Handbook Revised
    � 39.00 Getting Financing & Developing Land
    � 84.50 Greenbook: Standard Specifications for Public Works Construction 2012
    � 21.95 Home Builders’ Jobsite Codes 2012
    � 69.00 Insurance Restoration Contracting: Startup to Success
    � 34.00 25.50 Journeyman Elec Prep & Study Guide, Cosmetic Defect
    � 47.50 Markup & Profit: A Contractor’s Guide, Revisited
    � 37.75 Masonry & Concrete Construction Revised
    � 42.00 Moving to Commercial Construction
    � 87.50 National Construction Estimator w/FREE Natl. Estimator Download
    � 85.00 2011 National Electrical Code
    � 75.00 2008 National Electrical Code
    � 89.50 National Renovation & Ins. Repair Est. w/FREE Natl. Estimator Download
    � 55.50 Paper Contracting: The How-To of Construction Management Contracting
    � 35.00 Pipe & Excavation Contracting Revised
    � 29.95 Planning Drain, Waste & Vent Systems
    � 79.95 Residential Property Inspection Reports on CD-ROM
    � 42.00 Residential Wiring to the 2008 NEC
    � 95.00 Standard Estimating Practice, 9th Edition
    � 92.50 Standard Plans for Public Works Construction, 2012 Ed.
    � 39.95 Survive and Thrive in Building
    � 59.95 Sweets Green Building Square Foot Costbook 2014
    � 78.00 National Building Cost Manual
    � FREE Full Color Catalog

    10-Day Money Back Guarantee Prices subject to change without notice

    � Call me.
    1-800-829-8123
    Fax (760) 438-0398

    Order online www.craftsman-book.com
    Free on the Internet! Download any of

    Craftsman’s estimating databases
    for a 30-day free trial!

    www.craftsman-book.com/downloads

    Download all of Craftsman’s most popular costbooks for one low price with the Craftsman Site License.
    www.craftsmansitelicense.com

    Download free construction contracts legal for your state. www.construction-contract.net

    Building Code Compliance for Contractors & Inspectors

    An answer book for both contractors and build-
    ing inspectors, this manual explains what it takes
    to pass inspections under the 2009 International
    Residential Code. It includes a checklist for every
    trade, covering some of the most common rea-
    sons why inspectors reject residential work: foot-
    ings, foundations, slabs, framing, sheathing,
    plumbing, electrical, HVAC, energy conservation
    and final inspection. The requirement for each

    item is explained, and the code section cited. Knowing in advance
    what the inspector wants to see gives you an (almost unfair)
    advantage. To pass inspection, do your own pre-inspection before
    the inspector arrives. If you’re considering a career in code
    enforcement, this can be your guidebook.
    8½ x 11, 232 pages, $32.50

    eBook (PDF) also available; $16.25 at www.craftsman-book.com

    Contractor’s Guide to QuickBooks 2014

    QuickBooks 2014 has many new features that simplify a building
    contractor’s bookkeeping work. You’ll wonder how you managed
    without them. To help you make the most of these new features,
    or to make getting set up with QuickBooks almost painless, this
    user-friendly manual walks you through QuickBooks’ detailed
    setup procedure and explains step-by-step how to create a first-
    rate accounting system. You’ll learn in days, rather than weeks,
    how to use QuickBooks to get your contracting business orga-
    nized, with simple, fast accounting procedures. But setting up
    QuickBooks from scratch can be time-consuming. On the free
    download included with purchase of the book you’ll find a
    QuickBooks file preconfigured for a construction company. Open
    it, enter your company’s data, add info on your suppliers, subs and
    customers, and you’re up and running. The setup’s done for you.
    288 pages, 8½ x 11, $68.50

    See checklist for other available editions.

    eBook (PDF) also available; $34.25 at www.craftsman-book.com
    eBook (PDFs) also available for 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2010.

    On
    line
    Pr
    evi
    ew
    Buy this complete title here: https://goo.gl/X1XStt
    Buy similar Craftsman Book Co. titles here: https://www.Craftsman-Book.com

    http://craftsman-book.com/

    http://craftsman-book.com/

    http://www.constructioncontractwriter.com/

    http://www.craftsmansitelicense.com

    http://craftsman-book.com/

    http://craftsman-book.com/downloads/

    • Title Page
    • Contents of This Manual
      Explanation of the Cost Tables
      Area Modification Factors
      Building Cost Historical Index
      Residential Structures Section
      Single Family Residences
      Manufactured Housing
      Multi-Family Residences
      Motels
      Additional Costs for Residential Structures
      Multi-Family and Motel Garages
      Cabins and Recreational Dwellings
      Conventional Recreational Dwellings
      Additional Costs
      “A-Frame” Cabins
      Life in Years and Depreciation for Residences
      Index

    • Practical References for Builders

    Expert paper writers are just a few clicks away

    Place an order in 3 easy steps. Takes less than 5 mins.

    Calculate the price of your order

    You will get a personal manager and a discount.
    We'll send you the first draft for approval by at
    Total price:
    $0.00

    Order your essay today and save 20% with the discount code Newyr