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The Similarities and Differences Between Hemodialysis and Peritoneal Dialysis Essay

The Similarities and Differences Between Hemodialysis and Peritoneal Dialysis Essay

Many individuals are diagnose with kidney disease each year, and some individuals face a difficult situation concerning the possibility of doing dialysis, and choosing what type of dialysis treatment is right for the individual. Both Hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis give patients the quality of life. In contrast both procedures are done differently, Hemodialysis patients are dependent, and peritoneal dialysis patients are self-sufficient.

In comparison both removes waste from the bloodstream; however, both procedures are beneficial to treat kidney disease. Hemodialysis is a common procedure that removes waste from the bloodstream in patients’ whose kidneys does not function properly.

The hemodialysis procedure consist of using a machine called the dialyzer, and the patients’ own veins, which is often called a fistula, to transfer blood back and forth from the dialyzer to the patients’ arm.

However; because the fistula takes approximately six weeks to heal, patients often get a Vortex Graft placed, a Vortex Graft is plastic tubing placed inside of the patients’ vein most patients can use their graft in two to three weeks; However; there are some patients who have to start dialysis immediately; therefore, a Tunnel Catheter is placed, a Tunnel Catheter is a long flexible tube surgically inserted in a large vein in the neck, for immediate dialysis use.

Patients often do hemodialysis three days a week, every other day.

Most patients’ dialysis treatment runs approximately three to five hours each day, depending on what type of access they have. The day of their hemodialysis treatment, patients weigh themselves at the center and prepare to be seated to start their treatment. The dialysis technicians prep the dialyzer before the patients are ready to start dialyzing. The dialysis technicians take the patients’ temperature and blood pressure before the patients are seated. The dialysis technicians cleans the access site and make sure the site is working properly.

Dialysis technicians have to follow a certain protocol when putting dialysis patients on for their treatment. Therefore; patients and technicians wear face mask to keep from cross contaminations of blood and germs. More often; dialysis technicians change gloves throughout the treatment session. The technicians’ monitors the patients’ blood pressure throughout the dialysis procedure, because patients run a risk of their blood pressure getting too low; dialysis technician may have to administer saline solution to bring the patients’ blood pressure back up to a normal range.

The dialysis technicians log the patients’ blood pressure throughout the dialysis session. Once the patients are done with their dialysis session, the technicians take their temperature, blood pressure, and make sure their blood pressure is at a normal range before letting the patients leave their chair, once blood pressure is at a normal range; patients weigh themselves, and the technicians log it into the computer. Hemodialysis patients rely on their dialysis technicians for their dialysis treatment needs.

In addition, hemodialysis patients run into risk associated with taking hemodialysis. One of the most common risks is clotting of the arteries in the arm. Most of the time patients are sent to a nearby hospital to see a vascular surgeon to have to clot removed. Often the clot can be removed, and the patients can return the next day to restart their dialysis treatment; however, there are times when the clot cannot be removed; therefore patients have a temporary tunnel catheter placed.

Tunnel catheter is only placed temporarily placed until the surgeon can either fix the clotted arties, or place a new fistula. Tunnel catheter is the primary cause of most infections in hemodialysis patients and is one the primary reason for hospitalization of hemodialysis patients. Hemodialysis patients often drink too much fluid and in result have to pull off more fluid; therefore, their blood pressure may get too low. When hemodialysis pulls off excess fluid it also pulls off potassium, and patients may experience severe cramping.

Furthermore, hemodialysis patients follow a diet called “The Renal Diet;” patients have to eat foods; low in sodium, low in potassium, and low in phosphorus. Most patients on hemodialysis have a fluid restriction, normally; the fluid restriction is about four cups of fluid a day or six cups a fluid a day. Hemodialysis pulls the protein from the patients’ body; therefore patients have to eat a high protein diet. On the contrary, peritoneal dialysis is a common procedure that removes waste from the bloodstream in patients’ whose kidneys does not function properly.

The peritoneal dialysis procedure consists of using a fluid called dialysate, and a catheter; the catheter is placed in the abdomen of the kidney dialysis patients. When patients do peritoneal dialysis the dialysate solution is placed in the abdomen of the kidney patients and sits there for up to four hours; the hours the fluid sits is called the dwell time. Once the fluid has sat for a while the kidney dialysis patients exchange the old dialysate solution with new dialysate solution and start the whole process over again.

Peritoneal dialysis can be done in two different ways; Automated Peritoneal Dialysis and Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis. Automated Peritoneal Dialysis is done while the kidney dialysis patients are asleep and Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis is done every four hours approximately five times a day for 30 minutes. Patients who do peritoneal dialysis do it in their own home. Before starting peritoneal dialysis patients are properly trained by a nurse for three weeks. Patients must be able to do own treatments once training is over.

Peritoneal dialysis can choose what time a day to do their treatments, and what type of peritoneal dialysis treatment they prefer. Patients must order supplies each month and must have adequate amount of space to store supplies. Typically, patients start the day off by taken their blood pressure, temperature, and weight, and log the results. Before patients start a peritoneal dialysis treatment; patients close doors, window, and clean table with disinfectant. Patients’ then gather supplies for treatment, put on a face mask, and clean hands and exit site.

Patients then hook themselves up and began exchanging fluid, after done with treatment patients properly dispose of waste and enjoy the rest of their day. In addition, peritoneal dialysis patients run into risk associated with taking peritoneal dialysis. One of the most common risks is an infection called Peritonitis. Peritonitis is an infection of the peritoneum; a peritoneum is the lining of the abdominal that forms a sack. Most of the time patients are given antibiotics to eliminate the infection.

Peritoneal dialysis patients can develop a hernia; a hernia is a tear of the wall where an organ sticks out; therefore, patients should not lift heavy objects. Patients may experience bloating, constipation, weight gain, fluid overload, and dry skin associated with peritoneal dialysis. Furthermore, peritoneal dialysis patients follow a diet called “The Renal Diet;” patients have to eat foods low in sodium, low in phosphorus; however, patient can eat a potassium rich diet, because they dialyze every day.

Some patients on peritoneal dialysis have a fluid restriction; however, most patients who do peritoneal dialysis do not have a fluid restriction, because they dialyze every day. Peritoneal dialysis pulls the protein for the patients’ body; therefore patients have to eat a high protein diet. Peritoneal dialysis patients have to eat a low calorie diet, because they get some of their calories from the dextrose found in the dialysate solution.

In conclusion, both hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis are similar in so many ways; for example both dialysis procedures cleanse waste from the bloodstream of patients whose kidneys does not function properly, patients follow the same type of diet, and both treatments have to be done in a clean environment. Hemodialysis use a machine called the dialyzer and the patients’ arteries to transfer blood to and from the machine, and peritoneal dialysis use a fluid called dialysate and transfer fluid through a catheter placed in the patients’ abdomen.

Hemodialysis patients rely on their technician for all their dialysis treatments need, and peritoneal dialysis patients basically do all their on treatments. Hemodialysis patients’ schedules are preset, and peritoneal dialysis patients’ schedules are more flexible. In contrast both procedures are done differently, Hemodialysis patients are dependent, and peritoneal dialysis patients are self-sufficient. In comparison both removes waste from the bloodstream; however, both procedures are beneficial to treat kidney disease.